1948 Environmental Issues

718 Words 3 Pages
The state of the environment in 1948 was arguably similar to the state of the environment today. Environmental concerns such as air and water pollution were, and are currently a major concern. The main difference in 1948 however, was that pertinent regulations and laws had yet to be enacted. Conceivably, the main benefit of an unfortunate pollution catastrophe in 1948, which put into motion several environmental milestones, was the Federal Water Pollution Control Act. This act paved the road for environmental turning points such as The Clean Air Act of 1970, and the Clean Water act of 1972, as well as countless others. The Industrial Revolution in the 18th century fathered new and exciting methods of increased manufacturing and production, …show more content…
This act was essentially giving the water back to the citizens of the United States, and like the Clean Air Act also had an established deadline of 1985. Twenty-five years ago, only an estimated one third of the nation’s water sources were considered usable. The Water Act mainly enforced provisions for point source pollution, and since this type is definitive, it is heavily regulated by the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). Regulations are also in place for non-point source pollution, and filaments, unfortunately they are significantly more challenging to regulate due to the fact that they can be difficult to …show more content…
As long as there is a demand for products and an output of those products, pollution of the air, water, and soil, will always be a major cause for concern. An additional lingering dispute is that of global warming, and how emissions caused by humans are causing an increase in global temperature. Annual deforestation rates are increasing due to a heightened need for land, as well as resources for commercial and industrial use. Ozone is being depleted in certain areas, acidity levels are rising in the oceans as well as rivers, lakes, and streams, and different water sources. Other concerns such as urban sprawl, loss of biodiversity, natural resource depletion, public health issues and genetic engineering are all paramount when referring to current environmental problems. Perhaps the main reason for all of these obstacles is the number one reason our environment has become such a concern, overpopulation. It is no secret that our planet is facing resource depletion, and increasing population explosions are creating and ever increasing demand on already strained resources. The environmental concerns that we faced in 1948, are still very much present now, and will continue on to future generations. The passage of acts such as the Clean Air and Water Act have certainly provided a framework for processes that should continue to be worked

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