1945: The War That Never Ended By Gregor Dallas

1506 Words 7 Pages
In the Cold War’s passing, the idea of historians bringing to light the truth of what happened during it without the influence of political barriers setup. This brought the hope that a more open study of the period may bring about a new comprehension, with the new evidence available. In 1945: The War That Never Ended, Gregor Dallas takes a new approach to the view of World War II and the Cold War that followed, starting from the Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact of 1939 to the end of the 1950s. In these years, he describes the Soviet Union’s war against the Western World. Through this commonly pitched work states how the “war that never ended” was a battle between Stalin’s Soviet Union against a non-communist world. Dallas dictates that the …show more content…
Dallas believes that the cold war began long before 1947. This book, being based highly on research of published works, declares valuable points of conflict within the Big Three during the war. The Soviet’s refusal to support the 1944 Warsaw uprising shows as a clearly salient case. In Dallas’s description, the last months of combat in Europe, saw the inevitable fight for postwar power though the spastic movement of armies throughout Europe. This book portrays Stalin as the nemesis of peace. Dallas explains that Charles de Gualle would eventually discover that a deal with the Communist Leaders is an equivalent to one with the devil. Earlier, Dallas had described how Stalin 's communist party was thought up in the pits of Hell. Dallas restlessly demoralizes the Americans and British who attempted to ignore and even hide the crimes the Soviet regime committed, even if it was due to blindness, and especially if it was due to dishonesty or a want to decrease the conflict within the alliance. This book was not a chronological story of the year 1945. It is introduced with the Battle of Berlin, then jumps backward in time to 1944 and details the Warsaw uprising with the liberation of Paris, and included the movement of …show more content…
Some of the similes Dallas uses are more of a unique quality rather than a improving his audiences understanding of his book. He writes about how Europe is relatable to a wounded cat, much like its shape resembles. The book also becomes repetitive, for example, he quotes a diary entry of Goebbels from March of 1945, commenting on how he doubted the astrologer 's predictions, but exploited them for their propaganda value, and later used the exact same quote with in the same chapter. Extremely large portions of the book becomes devoted to trivial data. Dallas has a keen eye for detail, but much of the detail he describes is extraneous to the point he is trying to get across to his audience. He informs his audience about a considerable amount of detail on the weather. In a sizable work such as this one, there will inevitably be some or even many errors, especially in a non-fiction one. At a point in the book Dallas refers to a missile system that does not exist, being the inter-ballistic missile system and he improperly dates the merger of the KPD and the SPD in the Soviet Zone as October of 1945 rather than April of 1946. The areas of conflict surrounding the Big Three in described thoroughly by Dallas, but his interpretation is not successful in addressing the issues that his argument and thesis call for,

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