“To what extent do you consider foreign intervention the most significant barrier to peace between Arabs and Israelis across the period 1900-2000?”

1717 Words Oct 22nd, 2014 7 Pages
“To what extent do you consider foreign intervention the most significant barrier to peace between Arabs and Israelis across the period 1900-2000?”
Throughout the 20th Century relations between Arabs and Israelis in Palestine have undergone immense tension, change and deterioration, with both parties facing many barriers to peace. Foreign intervention is often listed as one such barrier to this peace. While the importance of foreign intervention cannot be omitted, other factors can be argued to have been both equally and more detrimental to the peace process. These include the founding of the Haganah, the 1948 War after the declaration of the State of Israel, and the rise of political extremism. The aim of this essay is to identify
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This anger certainly led to severe breakdown of relations. Similar breakdown was also caused by the casualties of the War - Ovendale writes that “innocents were murdered. For example, the Deir Yassin massacre witnessed the death of 245 men, women and children. Moreover … the Arabs retaliated, killing 77 mainly Jewish doctors and nurses.”. These casualties led, in the words of Stoll, to “almost irreparable relations between the belligerents”, highlighted further by Ross who writes that “Of course there was hatred on both sides before the War. The difference afterwards was that two sides came into daily contact”. The problem of refugees was also a considerable barrier which was set up by the War; Winston highlights that the War of 1948 led to the ejection of “539,000 Arabs from Israel and around 850,000 Jews from neighbouring Arab countries such as Syria and Egypt”. This severe displacement of peoples was hardest hitting often for the Arab population; this is self-evident from the poem “Naïve Song for the Red Cross” of 1948 by refugee Mahmud Darwish, where he vents that “they kneaded mud into my bread and dust into my eyelashes, in one night [they] exploded me into a torrent of fire … stripped me of a dove’s nature … My homeland

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