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86 Cards in this Set

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Character:
Achilles
hero of the Iliad; son of Peleus and the sea goddess Thetis; leader of the Myrmidons; withdraws from battle out of pride as a result of the quarrel with Agamemnon, but after the death of his friend Patroclus, returns and slays Hector.
Character:
Odysseus
known as Ulysses in the Aeneid; son of Laertes and Anticleia, husband of Penelope, father of Telemachus, King of Ithaca, and favorite of Athene, he is celebrated for his prudence, ingenuity, and resourcefulness among the Greek forces at Troy, the fall of which he engineers. Hero of the Odyssey, he demonstrates an endurance and adaptability that determines his successful return to Ithaca.
Character:
Sinon
a Greek spy who persuades the Trojans to take the Wooden Horse into their city.
Character:
Aeneas
son of Venus and Anchises, a mortal Trojan prince; the hero of the Aeneid. After Troy’s fall, he journeys to Italy, where he founds a dynasty that eventually produces Romulus and Remus,
the legendary founders of Rome.
Character:
Cassandra
daughter of Priam and Hecuba; she was Apollo’s virgin prophet; after the fall of Troy, she becomes part of Agamemnon’s booty and is brought to Argos (Mycenae), where Clytemnestra murders her.
Character:
Creusa
In the Aeneid, daughter of Priam, first wife of Aeneas and mother of Ascanius (Iulus); she is killed in the fall of Troy. (In Medea, she is the daughter of Corinth’s king, Jason’s intended bride.)
Character:
Hector
son of Priam and Hecuba; husband of Andromache; father of Astyanax; leading Trojan hero; slays Achilles’ friend Patroclus and is killed in revenge by Achilles.
Character:
Polydamas
trusted comrade and seer of the Trojan army.
Character:
Priam
King of Troy, husband of Hecuba, father of Hector, Paris, Cassandra, and (by various concubines) fifty sons.
Character:
Dido
Queen and founder of Carthage who befriends the shipwrecked Aeneas and is later deserted by him at Jupiter’s command.
Character:
Apollo
also called Phoebus, the radiant god of light, music, prophecy, and the arts. His most famous shrine was at Delphi, where his priestess, the Pythia, proclaimed the divine will.
Character:
Jupiter
the Roman equivalent of Zeus, king of the Olympian gods; the cosmic guarantor of justice, oath-keeping, civic order, and kingship.
Character:
Juno
the Roman name for Hera, queen of the gods; goddess of marriage and domesticity
Character:
Ceres
-one of the Penates
-Roman equivalent of Demeter, goddess of grain and earth’s fertility, who guarantees the Hearthgods growth of crops
Character:
Lares
-one of the Penates
-In Roman religion, the deified spirits of family ancestors
Character:
Vesta
-one of the Penates
-Roman name for Hestia, goddess of the hearth, the cooking fire. In Rome, the Vestal Virgins were charged with the sacred duty of keeping alight the Eternal Flame signifying the Roman state.
Character:
Venus
the Roman Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty; Italian goddess of gardens and flowers; mother of Aeneas
Character:
Vulcan
the Roman name for Hephaestus, god of fire and the forge
Ramayana Character:
Angada
Vali’s son; brother of Sugriva, king of the monkeys (Book 4)
Ramayana:
Aranya
The Forest
Ramayana:
Asoka
Grove in Lanka where Sita is kept (Book 3)
Ramayana:
Ayodhya
Capital city of Rama and family
Ramayana:
Bharata
a brother of Rama; son of Kaikeyi; he refuses to rule during Rama’s exile but lives an ascetic life in Nandigrama with Rama’s sandals on the throne (Book 2)
Ramayana Character:
Brahma
the Creator of the universe
Ramayana:
Pancavati
place in India where Rama had a cottage built for his dwelling during the exile (Book 3)
Ramayana Character:
Dasaratha
King of Kosala; father of Rama; exiles Rama; dies (Book 2)
Ramayana:
Godavari
a river in the Forest (Book 2)
Ramayana:
Puspaka
best of all flying chariots; an aircraft of extraordinary manoeuverability. It originally belonged to Kubera; Ravana took it away from him; Rama uses it to return to Ayodhya.
Ramayana Character:
Hanuman
Powerful monkey hero; a vanara-chief; son of Anjana and Kesari (offspring of vayu, the wind-god); discovers the whereabouts of Sita, leaps the ocean in a single bound, and in countless ways contributes to the success of Rama’s mission (Book 5)
Ramayana Character:
Indra
king of heaven; chief of gods; Indian counterpart of the Greek god Zeus
Ramayana:
Rama
son of Dasaratha and Kausalya; said to be an incarnation of Visnu; the hero of the Ramayana
Ramayana Character:
Jambavan
said to be a bear, a tribal chief and ally of Rama (Book 4)
Ramayana Character:
Janaka
adopted father of Sita; king of Mithila
Ramayana:
Ravana
born of a sage, Ravana got a boon of near-invincibility from the Creator; he oppresses the sages; abducts Sita, fights with Rama, and is killed by him (Book 3)
Ramayana:
Janasthana
part of the forest, where sages lived (Book 3)
Ramayana:
Keikeyi
Bharata’s mother; wife of Dasaratha; she demands that Rama be exiled and Bharata crowned king
Ramayana:
Kausalya
Rama’s mother; wife of Dasaratha
Ramayana:
Sagara
deity of the ocean; ancestor to Rama (Book 5)
Ramayana:
Kiskhinda
kingdom of monkeys, Vali and Sugriva (Book 4)
Ramayana:
Laksmana
son of Dasaratha and Sumitra; of the 3 brothers, he is Rama’s constant companion (Book 2)
Ramayana:
Sampati
said to be a vulture; son of Suparsva; brother of Jatayu; helps Hanuman find Sita; Icarus figure (Book 4)
Ramayana:
Lanka
the kingdom over which Ravana rules; where Sita is prisoner (Book 5)
Ramayana:
Mainaka
a hill that springs from the ocean during Hanuman’s historic flight to Lanka (Book 5)
Ramayana:
Satrughna
brother of Rama; son of Dasaratha and Sumitra; he is devoted to Bharata (Book 3)
Ramayana:
Sumatra
charioteer of king Dasaratha and Rama
Ramayana:
Manthara
hunchback maidservant of Kaikeyi, who instigates her to have Rama exiled
Ramayana:
Simhika
a demoness who obstructs Hanuman’s flight to Lanka (Book 5)
Ramayana:
Sumitra
one of the wives of Dasaratha; mother of Laksmana and Satrughna
Ramayana:
Marica
a demon and accomplice of Ravana; expert in sorcery; he is hit by Rama but not killed; later he takes the form of a golden deer, luring Rama away; Rama kills him (Book 3)
Ramayana:
Matali
charioteer of Indra, king of gods (Book 6)
Ramayana:
Sita
adopted daughter of king Janaka; wife of Rama; name means “furrow”; daughter of goddess earth
Ramayana:
Surasa
mother of the nagas, which are a class of serpents; she is an obstacle to Hanuman during his flight to Lanka (Book 5)
Ramayana:
Trijata
a demoness (who dreams), but a friend to Sita in the Asoka-grove (Book 5)
Ramayana:
Sugriva
a vanara (monkey) chief; ally of Rama; brother of Vali whom he offends through a misunderstanding; driven away from the kingdom, Sugriva lives on a nearby hill until Rama kills Vali and installs him on the throne; he organizes the invasion of Lanka; Ruma is his wife (Book 4)
Ramayana:
Nahusa
an ancestor of Rama, who became so powerful that he claimed the throne of Indra, king of gods, but an arrogant act soon effected his fall from his exalted position (Book 3)
Ramayana:
Surpanakha
demoness sister of Ravana who tries to seduce Rama in the forest and has her face mutilated by Laksmana (Book 3)
Ramayana:
Vibhisana
the pious brother of Ravana, who abandons him and seeks Rama’s asylum; plays a vital part in the defeat of Ravana; is crowned king of Lanka after the death of Ravana (Book 6)
Ramayana:
Vali
powerful brother of Sugriva (the monkey-chief); unfairly seizes Sugriva’s kingdom; after Rama’s alliance with Sugriva, Rama kills Vali (Book 4)
Agamemnon:
Achaens
term for the Greeks who besiege Troy; also called Argives or Danaans
Agamemnon:
Aegisthus
son of Thyestes and his daughter Pelopia; he becomes Clytemnestra’s lover, plots to kill Agamemnon, and is slain by Orestes.
Agamemnon:
Areopagus
the “hill of Ares (Mars),” a spur of the Athenian Acropolis, where Athene establishes a court for homicides; the site of Orestes’s trial in the Eumenides
Agamemnon:
Aulis
seaport at which Greek troops assembled before sailing to Troy; site of Iphigenia’s sacrifice
Agamemnon:
Calchas
Greek prophet who accompanies the Achaens to Troy
Agamemnon:
Clytemnestra
daughter of Tyndareus (or Zeus) and Leda, sister of Helen, wife of Agamemnon, mistress of Aegisthus, and mother of Iphigenia, Electra, Chrysothemis, and Orestes. After murdering Agamemnon, she is slain by Orestes, her son.
Agamemnon:
Dionysus
son of Zeus and Semele; god of the vine that produces wine; a male fertility figure who represents
a great variety of natural forces, including the vegetative cycle of life, growth, death, and rebirth,
and the conflicting power of human instinctual passions. Also called Bacchus, Bromius, and Liber.
Agamemnon:
Euminides
Greek name for the Kindly Ones, formerly the Furies
Agamemnon:
Hermes
son of Zeus and Maia; his father’s messenger; guide of dead souls; patron of travellers, merchants, highaymen, gamblers, and thieves
Agamemnon:
Iphigeneia
daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra whom her father sacrifices at Aulis to prevent the Greeks’ expedition against Troy from being disbanded
Agamemnon:
Menelaus
son of Atreus, younger brother of Agamemnon, husband of Helen, and king of Sparta
Agamemnon:
Orestes
son of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra, brother of Iphigenia and Electra, and husband of Hermione (daughter of Helen), kills Clytemnestra
Agamemnon:
Tantalus
son of Zeus and father of Pelops, whose flesh he serves to the Olympians, an act for which he is condemned to eternal torment in Tartarus
Agamemnon:
Thyestes
brother of Atreus and father of Aegisthus; commits adultery with Atreus’s wife. Pretending a reconciliation, Atreus invites Thyestes to a banquet, where his unsuspecting brother dines on the flesh of his sons
Gilgamesh:
Anu
God of the firmament, the patron god of Uruk, husband of Antun, and father of Ishtar.
Gilgamesh:
Anunnaki
Gods of the underworld or the seven judges of the dead. Offspring of Anu. Their sacred dwellings are in the Forest of Cedars guarded by Humbaba. They also appear in Utnapishtim’s account of the great flood as forerunners of the storm.
Gilgamesh:
Ea
was the god of wisdom, whose particular element was the sweet waters bringing life to the land and whose house was at Eridu, which was then on the Persian Gulf. He breaks rank with the council of the gods and warns Utnapishtim of the impending flood.
Gilgamesh:
Ereshkigal
The queen of the underworld, who appears in Enkidu’s dream of the afterlife; wife of Nergal.
Gilgamesh:
Enlil
God of earth, wind, and the universal air, ultimately spirit. He was the patron of the city of Nippur, and was the storm and wind, breath and “the word” of Anu. In the Gilgamesh epic, he appears most often in his destructive aspect; and beside him Anu is a remote being who lives far away in the firmament, beyond the gate of heaven.
Gilgamesh:
Ishtar
was worshipped in the great temple in Uruk, together with Anu. She is the queen of heaven, and as goddess of love and war an equivocal character, like Aphrodite. She is fickle and at times spiteful.
Gilgamesh:
Ninsun
mother of Gilgamesh; wife of Lugulbanda; minor goddess whose house was in Uruk and who was known for wisdom.
Gilgamesh:
Siduri
Goddess of the vine who lives on the shore of the sea (perhaps the Mediterranean) in the garden of the sun.
Gilgamesh:
Sin
The moon god to whom Gilgamesh prays as he passes through dark mountain passes populated by lions on his way to Mashu.
Gilgamesh:
Shamash
whom the Sumerians called Utu, is the kindly and just sun god, law-giver, and judge who is evoked in blessing and protection throughout the epic.
Gilgamesh:
Enkidu
Gilgamesh’s “second self” and faithful companion. Arruru fashions Enkidu out of clay in the image of Anu. Enkidu is a “wild,” primitive, or uncivilized man who has both the hardened physique and virtue of Ninurta, the god of war; the long hair of Ninursa, goddess of corn; and the hairy body of Samuquan, god of cattle. Enkidu runs freely with the animals and lives in the wilderness until he meets a Trapper, whose snares Enkidu has destroyed, at a well.
Gilgamesh:
Humbaba
A fearsome monster who is guardian of the cedar forest and who opposes Gilgamesh. In a fierce battle, Gilgamesh and Enkidu ultimately kill Humbaba and cut down the sacred cedars.
Gilgamesh:
Urshanabi
Boatman who takes Gilgamesh over the waters of death, which divide the garden of the sun from the paradise where Utnapishtim lives forever. Utnapishtim curses Ushanabi for bringing a mortal to him across the sea of death. After Urshanabi helps Gilgamesh back to health and vigor, he returns to Uruk with Gilgamesh.
Gilgamesh:
Utnapishtim
In the Sumerian poems, he is a wise king and priest. Favored by the god Ea, he is warned of Enlil’s plan to destroy humanity through a flood. At Ea’s command, he builds a huge square boat and rides out the seven-day storm. When the crisis is over, he offers a sacrifice to the gods. In restitution for his thoughtless punishment of humanity, Enlil blesses Utnapishtim and his wife, grants them immortality, and places them “in the distance at the mouth of the rivers.” He becomes the object of Gilgamesh’s final quest as he seeks the secret of eternal life.