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53 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Burgundy
Where it is
Eastern France
Continental
Between Dijon and Lyon
Extreme temperature variations
Hail, frost, and rain at harvest are threats
Burgundy
Key historical people and events
Evidence of vine cultivation: 2nd century
Monastic influence(of or pertaining to monasteries)
• Cellars and storerooms for production and aging
•Systematic records
•Benedictine: 900’s
•Cistercians: founded 1098
•Discovered importance of terroir
Dukes of Burgundy
•Governed Burgundy 1363-1477
•Quality and status conscious
•Philip the Bold
French revolution
•Anti-Papist(Anti-Catholicism)
•Lands taken from the Church
Sold off
Napoleanic Code
•Property divided equally between children
•Fragmented ownership
Burgundy
The climate
•Continental Hot summers, cold winters
•Ripening can be difficult
•Hail
Spring frosts
•Rain at harvest
Burgundy Soils
Burgundy-Essential Factors
Soils
Kimmeridgean clay(chablis)
•Chalky clay
•Limestone with clay
•Limestone
•Granite(beaujolais)
Burgundy
The key grape varieties
chardonnay
aligote
pinot noir
gamay
Burgundy
Viticultural techniques employed
•High density plantings

•Generally Guyot trained, low to ground(Cote D'Or)
Gobelet trained in Beaujolais (spur pruned)
Vineyards face E or SE for max sunlight
•Hand harvesting for best cru
•Some organic and biodynamic farming
•Vines grafted to resistant rootstock
clones are importantin different mesoclimates
Burgundy
Methods of production/vinification
•Plafond Limité Classement abolished(an increase of the maximum yield granted by the INAO)
•Yield assessed on a vintage to vintage basis
•10 year average
•Approximately 50 hl/ha for village
•Approx. 35 hl/ha for Grand Cru
Burgundy
Vinification-Reds
•Pre-fermentation maceration “cold soak” for color
•Chaptalisation common
•Natural yeast or inoculation
•Pigeage in open topped oak fermenters (punch down)
•Carbonic maceration for Beaujolais
•Old and new barrels for aging
Burgundy
Vinification-Whites
•Some whole bunch pressing
•Maturation varies by region
majority are dry
Burgundy
Appellation Laws
Five levels of AOC
•Regional AC – AC Bourgogne Blanc
•District AC – AC Beaujolais
•Commune AC – AC Gevrey-Chambertin
•Premier Cru – AC Gevrey-Chambertin Clos St.Jacques 1er cru
•Grand Cru – AC Charmes-Chambertin
Burgundy
levels of AOC
•Regional AC
Producer
Bourgogne Blanc
Domaine Patrick Javillier Bourgogne Blanc Cuvee des Forgets 2006
(Meursault) With white peach, nectarine, minerals

Bourgogne Rouge
2006 Michel Picard Bourgogne Rouge
(whose chateau is in Chassagne-Montrachet)
Buoyant red plum, spice and tomato leaf note, with tart cranberry, richer boysenberry and plum skin on the palate

Bourgogne Rose'
CHATEAU PULIGNY MONTRACHET BOURGOGNE ROSE 2007
Burgundy
levels of AOC
Name District AC
Beaujolais AC

ChablisAC
Burgundy
levels of AOC
•Commune AC
Producer and notes
Burgundy
levels of AOC
•Commune AC
AC Gevrey-Chambertin
Louis Jadot Gevrey-Chambertin
Aromas and flavors of ripe black cherry typical to Gevrey-Chambertin mark this wine, which shows firm tannic structure allied to silky, elegant fruit with nuances of sweet oak and spice ending in a full finish.
Burgundy
levels of AOC
•Premier Cru –
Producer and notes
•Premier Cru – AC Gevrey-Chambertin Clos St.Jacques 1er cru
This superb premier cru is the most intense of Gevrey, with silky, dense black cherry and raspberry fruit flavors and aromas and seductive notes of tobacco and spice ending in a refined, complex finish.
Burgundy
levels of AOC
•Grand Cru
Producer and notes
•Grand Cru – AC Charmes-Chambertin
Louis Jadot-Burgundy Charmes-Chambertin
The most extensive of Gevrey's grands crus, this is a firmly structured, densely textured wine with ripe dark stone fruit flavors and aromas and notes of spice, earth and tobacco confirmed on the lengthy finish.
Burgundy Vintages
05.02,99,96
Chablis
Where it is
•Northern most départment: Yonne
Halfway between Beaune and Paris
Chablis
The climate
•Northern most départment: Yonne
•Cold Continental
•Low average temperature
•Spring frosts
•Smudge pots, aspersion
•Risk of hail
minimal Atlantic influence
Chablis
The major soil types
•Chalky clay
•Dead sea creatures
•Calcium rich
•Kimmeridgian clay
•Portlandian clay
Chablis
Aspect and rivers
All grand crus are along the Serein river facing Sw, including premier cru's Fourchamme and Montee de Tonnerre (primier crus slopes face SE)
Chablis
Viticultural techniques employed
•Lime resistant rootstock
•Guyot and Cordon trained vines
•Machine harvesting common for basic wines
•Grand Cru sites picked mostly by hand
Chablis
Chablis
vinicultural
Chablis
Vinification
•Traditional lack of overt oak influence
•Steely, flinty, green tinged
•Producers divided over use of new oak
•1er and Grand Cru more likely oaked
•Malolactic according to producer and vintage
Chablis
Appellation levels
•Petit Chablis
•Chablis
•Premier Cru (40)- Fourcharme, Vaillons, Montée de Tonnerre, Montmains
•Grand Cru (7) – Les Clos, Blanchots, Bougros, Vaudésir, Valmur, Preuses & Grenouilles
Chablis
Petit Chablis producer
Jean-Marc Brocard Petit Chablis Domaine Sainte Claire 2007
Chablis
producer
Louis Moreau Chablis Ac
Chablis
premier cru(1er cru)
Chablis
premier cru(1er cru)Chablis
Michel Laroche Chablis 1er Cru Les Vaudevey
Chablis
grand cru producer
Michel Laroche Chablis Grand Cru Les Blanchots Réserve de l'Obédience "ultimate Grand Cru with nothing spared"
Other Appellations of the Yonne
St. Bris AC
•Upgraded from VDQS in 2001 Sauvignon Blanc
•Grown on Kimmeridgean and Portlandian soils
•Sauvignon Blanc
Other Appellations of the
Yonne
Irancy AC
Irancy AC
•Regional appellation
•Red wines
•Pinot Noir and César
•Deep color
•Full of tannin and backbone
French Wine Law
Late 1800’s
French Wine Law
Late 1800’s
•Trouble for wine industry
•Oidium
•Phylloxera
Downy Mildew
•Worldwide demand increases
•Demand for exports
French Wine Law
Early 1900s
French Wine Law
Early 1900s
•Need for government intervention
•Framework laid for A.O.C. system
•1929 Châteauneuf du Pape
•Originally to protect producer
•Service de Repression des Fraudes
•INAO founded in 1935
French Wine Law
Institut National de l’Origine et de la qualité (INAO)
What is it?
French Wine Law
Institut National de l’Origine et de la qualité (INAO)
•Administers, grants and regulates appellations
•Governs quality wine production
•AC or AOC, AO-VDQS
4 levvels of French Wine Law
-Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC or AC)
-Vin Délimité de Qualité Supérieure
-Vin de Pays
-Vin de Table
French Wine Law
Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC or AC)
what does it govern?
•Highest level
•Boundaries based on terroir
•Grape varieties
•Yields
Viticultural, vinification, maturation
•Minimum alcohol levels
Vin Délimité de Qualité Supérieure
what does it govern?
Vin Délimité de Qualité Supérieure
•Stepping stone to AOC
•Laws similar to AOC, but less stringent
•Small % of production
•Category disappearing
Vin de Pays
what does it govern?
•Created in 1973-1979
•Region on label
•More room for experimentation
Levels of Vin de Pays
•Departmental :e.g. d’Oc
•Regional: e.g.Herault
•Zonal: e.g.Cassan
French wine laws
Vin de Table
•what does it govern
French wine laws
Vin de Table

•Most basic wines
•No restriction on grape variety or yield
•Declining market
Burgundy-History
Ancient
Ancient
•Evidence of vine cultivation:2nd century
Burgundy-History
Monastic influence
Monastic influence
•Cellars and storerooms for production and aging
•Systematic records
•Benedictine: 900’s
•Cistercians: founded 1098
•Discovered importance of terroir
Burgundy-History
Dukes of Burgundy
Dukes of Burgundy
•Governed Burgundy 1363-1477
•Quality and status conscious
•Philip the Bold
Burgundy-History
French revolution
French revolution
•Anti-Papist
•Lands taken from the Church
•Sold off
Burgundy-History
Napoleanic Code
Napoleanic Code
•Property divided equally between children
•Fragmented ownership
Burgundy-Trade
Grower
Burgundy-Trade
Grower
•Many owning small plots of land
•Diverse regions
Burgundy-Trade
Négociant
Négociant
Buys grapes, must or wine
Own label
Burgundy-Trade
Cooperative
Burgundy-Trade
Cooperative
•Growers pool resources
Burgundy-Trade
Domaine
Domaine
•Grower-bottled wine
Name three Grand Crus of the Cote de Nuits. Provide location, wine style, producer and tasting note.
Clos-de -Beze-Chambertin. Locted in the town of Gevery-Chambertin
-38 acres (15.4 ha) situated further up the hillside from the Chambertin Grand cru.
-Pinot Noir production. (Pinot Gris, Pinot Liebault) This wine is reputed to have a greater finesse than Chambertin but slightly less body. saturated medium red. Sappy, perfumed aromas of cherry, stone and spice, with a hint of more exotic fruits. Dense and silky on the palate, conveying a strong impression of solidity and soil character. Sweetened by a hint of caramelly oak.
-Clos de Tart (17acres, 7ha)
The vineyard of Clos de Tart, Mommessin’s Grand Cru monopoly, covers 18 acres of the very best slopes in the village of Morey Saint Denis. Adjacent to Bonnes Mares. (Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Pinot Liebault) Mommessin's monoploe creates beautiful dark ruby color.A nose of great finesse, and aromas of red fruits: strawberry, raspberry and blackcurrant. Extremely polished and rich with an impressive spicy, berry character and tons of ultra-fine tannins.
-La Tache
Grands crus are often subdivided in minute plots among many owners.
But La Tâche is entirely owned by Domaine de la Romanee-Conti, a fact that makes it a "monopole." The domaine (also called simply DRC) has exclusive rights on a second vineyard -- the grand cru Romanee-Conti itself. It's almost joined at the hip with La Tache; they are within a stone's throw of one another. As befits grands crus from the Côte d'Or, Burgundy's "golden slope," both vineyards are well-drained and exposed to the east-southeast; both tilt down gently on the hillside toward the stone walls surrounding Vosne-Romanee. (Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Pinot Liebault) Intense aromas of the most concentrated strawberries and cherries. Also vanilla, caramel and the oak is evident. Tons of very sweet ripe fruit. Large bodied and dense. A very intense wine with a long finish.
Name two Grand Crus of the Cote de Beaune. Provide location, wine style, producer and tasting note.
Le Montrachet
Montrachet is a grand cru vineyard between the villages of Chassagne-Montrachet and Puligny-Montrachet that produces what many consider to be the greatest white wine in the world(cote de beaune). 7.998 ha or 19.76 acres. Louis Jadot Le Montrachet dense and elegant, marked by intense ripe pear and stone fruit flavors, underscored by mineral, spice and grilled nut tones set in a finely honed structure ending in a subtle, honeyed texture.
Corton-Charlemagne
Louis Latour Corton-Charlemagne Grand Cru
From the slopes of the famed hill of Corton in Ladoix-Serrigny. Stony limestone
Chardonnay. beautiful straw colour in the glass. rich and opulent with aromas of vanilla and woodspice.big and fat with those vanilla and woodspice coming through in the mouth along with smoky flavours.
Côte de Nuits
Climate
•Semi continental
•Cold winters
•Hot summers
•Hail
rain at harvest
Côte de Nuits
Soil
Côte de Nuits
Soil
•Limestone base
•Marl and clay particles
•Brown limestone particles
•Some iron rich clay
•Richer alluvial on lower slopes
Côte de Beaune
Climate
Côte de Beaune
Climate
•More moderate than Nuits
•Some hail
•Wet winds and rain are hazards
Côte de Beaune
Soil
Côte de Beaune
Soil
•Limestone base with some outcroppings
•Light coloured marl
•Flinty clay, calcareous topsoils