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132 Cards in this Set

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A list of all security descriptors that have been set up for a particular object, such as for a shared folder or a shared printer.
access control list (ACL)
An encrypted set of information associated with a workstation that is equivalent to a unique digital fingerprint and that is used to authenticate logon to a server, such as a Web server.
certificate
The most basic name of a object in the Active Directory, such as the name of a printer.
common name (CN)
A namespace in which every child object contains the name of its parent object.
contiguous namespace
A namespace in which the child object name does not resemble the name of its parent object.
disjointed namespace
A name in the Active Directory that contains all hierarchical components of an object, such as that object's organizational unit and domain, in additional to the object's common name. The distinguished name is used by an Active Directory client to access a particular object, such as a printer.
distinguished name (DN)
A list of Windows 2000 Server users that enables one e-mail message to be sent to all users on the list. A distribution group is not used for security and thus cannot appear in an ACL.
distribution group
A grouping of resource objects, for example, servers and user accounts, that is one element of the Active Directory in Windows 2000 Server. A ______ usually is a higher-level representation of how a business, government, or school is organized, for example reflecting a geographical size or major division of the organization.
domain
A windows 2000 server that contains a full copy of Active Directory information, that is used to add a new object to the Active Directory, and that replicates all changes made to it so those changes are updated on every DC in the same domain.
domain controller (DC)
A protocol used to provide a range of security services for different manufacturer's security device, such as smart cards. EAP is used with other remote access protocols, for example for security through the Internet.
Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP)
A group of trees that each have contiguous namespaces within their own damain structure, but that have disjointed namespaces between trees. The trees and their domains use the same schema and global catalog.
forest
A grand repostory for all objects and the most frequently used attributes for each object in all domains. Each tree has one global catalog.
global catalog
A unique number, up to 16 characters long, that is associated with an Active Directory object.
globally unique identifier (GUID)
A set of IP-based secure communications and encryption standards created through the Internet Engineering task Force (IETF).
IP security (IPSec)
A set of two-way trust between two or more domains in which Kerberos security is used.
Kerberos transitive trust relationship
In Windows 2000 Server, there can be multiple servers, called DCs that store the Active Directory and replicate it to each other. Because each DC acts as a master, replication does not stop when one is down, and updates to Active Directory continue, for example creating a new account.
multimaster replication
A process used to translate a computer's domain name into the object that it represents. such as to a dotted decimal address associated with a computer, and vice versa.
name resolution
A lobical area on a network that contains directory services and named objects, and that has the ability to perform name resolution.
namespace
A network resource, such as a server or a user account, which has distinct attributes or properties, which is usually defined to a domain, and which exist in the Windows 2000 Active Directory.
object
A grouping of objects, usually within a domain, that provides a means to establish specific policies for governing those objects that enables object management to be delegated.
organizational unit (OU)
In Windows 2000, privilege to access an object, such as to view the object or to change it.
permission
An object name in the Active Directory that has two or more related components, such as the RDN of a user account name that consists of User and the first and last name of the actual user.
relative distinguished name (RDN)
In Windows 2000, access privileges for high-level activities such as logging on to a server from the network, shutting down a server, and logging on locally.
right
Elements used in the definition of each object contained in the Active Directory, including the object class and its attributes.
schema
An authentication method that used certificates to verify users' right to access a remote server, such as a Web server.
Secure Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS)
An individual security property associated with a Windows 2000 Server object, for example to enable the account MGardner (the _______ ______) to access the folder, Databases.
security descriptor
A group of Windows 2000 Server users that assign access privileges to objects and services. _______ _______s appear in ACLs.
security group
An Active Directory model that links two or more forest in a parnership; however, the forests cannot have Kerberos transitive trusts or use the same schema.
separate forest
An Active Directory model in which there is only one forest, with inter-connected trees and domains that use the same schema and global catalog.
single forest
An option in the Active Directory to interconnect IP subnets so that the server can determine the faster route to connect clients for authentication and to connect DCs for replication of the Active Directory. _____ information also enables the Active Directory to create redundant routes for DC replication.
site
An Active Directory object that combines individual site link objects to create faster routes, when there are three or more site links.
site link bridge
An object created in the Active Directory to indicate one or more physical links between two different sites.
site link object
A security device that contains information such as access keys, passwords, and a personal identification number (PIN). The _____ _____ is about the size of a credit card and can be plugged into a computer.
smart card
A trust relationship between two or more domains in a tree in which each domain has access to objects in the others.
transitive trust
Related domains that use a contiguous namespace, share the same schema, and have two-way, transitive trust relationships.
tree
A domain that has been granted security access to resources in another domain.
trusted domain
A domain that allows another domain security access to its resources and objects, such as servers.
trusting domain
A domain relationship in which both domains are trusted and trusting enabling one to have access to objects in the other.
two-way trust
A name that combines an account name with the domain name, such as RobBrown@tracksport.org, for easy identification, such as in e-mail.
user principle name (UPN)
A text file that contains a complete set of instructions for installing Windows 2000 in the unattended mode.
answer file
A program on a read-only or flash memory chip that establishes basic communication with components such as the monitor and disk drives. The advantage of a flash chip is that you can update the BIOS.
basic input/output system (BIOS)
A license to enable a workstation to connect to Windows 2000 Server as a client.
Client access license (CAL)
A computer set up to boot from two or more different operating systems, such as Windows 2000 and MS-DOS.
dual-boot system
A disk that contains repair, diagnostic, and backup information for use in case there is a problem with Windows 2000.
emergency repair disk (ERD)
An operation that divides a disk into small sections called tracks and sectors for the storage of files.
format
A set of program routines that enables an operating system to control a hardware component, such as the processor, from within the operating system kernel.
hardware abstraction layer (HAL)
A server that is a member of an existing Windows 2000 domain, but that does not function as a domain controller.
member server
A process in which a hard disk section or a complete hard disk is set up for use by an operating system. A disk can be formatted after it is partitioned.
partition
A server software license that requires that there be enough licenses for all network client workstations.
per seat licensing
A server software license based on the maximum, number of clients that log on to the server at one time.
per server licensing
Installing only a specific portion of a service pack instead of the entire update.
slip streaming
A server that is not a member of a domain, but that is a member of and existing workgroup or that establishes its own workgroup, such as in peer-to-peer networking.
standalone server
A text file that contains an answer set of unique instructions for installing Windows 2000 in the unattended mode that is used with the answer file.
uniqueness database file (UDF)
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Lists the switches for Winnt
/?
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Initiates the accessibility options for those who have visual, hearing, or movement disabilities
/a
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Executes a command after the Windows portion of the setup, for example to start a program or open the Contro Panel
/e:command
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Specifies that you are using an initialization file other than the default, Dosnet.inf (This initialization file shows where installation files are located)
/i:initialization filename
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Creates an optional folder or files copied from the Windows 2000 Server CD-ROM (The folder remains after the installation is completed)
/r:foldername
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Creates an optional folder or files copied from the Windows 2000 Server CD-ROM (the folder is deleted after the installation is completed)
/rx:folder
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Uses a path for the installation files other than the current path
/s:drive:\folder and \s:\\server\share\folder
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Copies the temporary files used by the installation to a specified location (otherwise, thay are copied to the target drive of the installation)
/t:drive\folder
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Used in an unattended installation to specify the name of the script or answer file containing installation commands and should be used with the /s command
/u:script file
Command-line Switches for Winnt: Enables a uniqueness database file to be used with an unattended installation as a way to ensure that particular information it the script can be changed, such as the name of the server ("id"specifies the name of the database file, for example udf:install.dbf)
udf:id
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Lists the switches for Winnt32
/?
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Creates only a report to tell you if the computer is compatible with Windows 2000 (the report is called Upgrade.txt for computers running Windows 95/98, and Winn32.log for computers running Windows NT 3.51 or 4.0)
/checkupgradeonly
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Executes a command before the Windows portion of the setup is completed and just after you have provided configuration information
/cmd:command
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Adds a Recovery Console option to the Boot.ini file so that you can fix problems with an installation.
/comdcons
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Creates a special subfolder in the final Winnt directory, usually implemented for information specific to the installation, for example to store specialized drivers for use only during the installation (the folder is retained after the installaion is completed)
/copydir:folder
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Creates a special subfolder in the final Winnt directory, usually implemented for information specific to that installation, for example to store specialized drivers for use during the installation or to store for later use (the folder is deleted after the installation is completed)
/copysource:folder
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Creates a file to help you debug installation problems, on the basis of the level you specify (Winnt32.log is the default if no file is specified; levels are 0=major errors, 1=errors, 2=warnings,3=information, 4=detailed information)
/debug level:file
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Enables you to install files from the default installation folders on the CD-ROM and from a folder you specify with the /m command--(if the installation finds two files of the same name, it uses the file in the folder specified by /m)
/m:folder
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Copies the CD-ROM source files to the same disk that is designated for the Wint folder (enabling you to later install additional services or components from your local hard disk)
/makelocalsource
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Does not automatically reboot after files are copied to the hard disk, enabling you to run a command in the interim, for example to check the dates on driver files for the most current versions
/noreboot
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Uses a path for the installation files other that the current path--also enables you to copy files from two or more sources by specifying multiple/s commands
/s:drive:\folder and /s:\\server\share\folder
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Enables you to copy the files used by setup to a hard drive, remove the hard drive, and install it in another computer (can be used by computer manufacturer, who install the first phase, but leave the second phase of the installation to the purchaser to specify parameters unique to her or his site such as the server name; must be used with/tempdrive)
/syspart:drive
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: temproty files and the final Windows 2000 system files are copied to the drive specified, for example to drive D: in /tempdrive:D
/tempdrive:drive
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Enables you to upgrade a version of Windows 2000 to a later version, using the parameters already in place for your current version
/unattend
Used in an unattended installation to specify the name of the script file containing installation commands (the seconds parameter is used to create an interval between the time that the setup files are copied and the time that the computer reboots, so you can interrupt to enter a command)
/unattend {seconds}:script file
Command-line Switches for Winnt32: Enables a uniqueness database file to be used with an unattended installation so that particular information in the script can be changed, such as the name of the server (id specifies the name of the database file, for example udf:install.dbf)
udf:id
Windows Service Pack Update Switches: Close all programs when the operating system shuts down prior to rebooting
-f
Windows Service Pack Update Switches: Disable the backup of old files used to uninstall the servicepack
-n
Windows Service Pack Update Switches: Automatically copy new files over the old OEM files
-o
Windows Service Pack Update Switches: Install using the quiet mode so that the user does not have to respond to prompts during the installation
-q
Windows Service Pack Update Switches: Install using the unattended mode
-u
Windows Service Pack Update Switches: List the available switches
/?
Windows Service Pack Update Switches: Slip switch
-s
Accessibility Options: Enables the display to be set to use colors and contrast for easier viewing
Display
Accessibility Options: Sets alternative keyboard and mouse access features and provides notification when an accessibility feature is turned off.
General
Accessibility Options: Provides alternate touch and sound options for keyboard functions
Keyboard
Accessibility Options: Enables the keyboard keypad to act as a pointing device
Mouse
Accessibility Options: Displays visual warnings and captions for sounds
Sound
Windows Components: Installs components that include a wizard to configure accessiblility options, accessories such as Notepad, communication tools, games, and multimedia tools
Accessories and Utilities*
Windows Components: Used for certification authority for security through certificates
Certificate Services*
Windows Components: Used to quickly search file contents for specific words or strings of words
Indexing Service
Windows Components: Installs Internet Information Services for a Web site and for FTP-based file transfers through TCP/IP
Internet Information Services (IIS)*
Windows Components: Used to manage and monitor the server and the network
Management and Monitoring Tools
Windows Components: Sevices for network-based messaging
Message Queuing Services
Windows Components: Installs protocols for specialized services that include DNS, QoS, DHCP, and other services
Network Services*
Windows Components: Enables print services for UNIX and Macintosh computers
Other Network File and Print Services
Windows Components: Enables the installation of Windows 2000 Professional on remote computers that can be booted remotely
Remote Installation Services
Windows Components: Used to enable Windows 2000 to write to remote devices, such as tape drives
Remote Storage
Windows Components: Enables debugging of ActiveX script tools, VB script for example
Script Debugger
Windows Components: Enables clients to run programs located on the server, as though they were terminals
Terminal Services (remote/programs)*
Windows Components: Controls licensing for terminal services
Terminal Service Licensing
Windows Components: Used to "stream" multimedia from the server to the clients, so that an audio/video file starts playing before it is fully received
Windows Media Services
Display Options: Sets the appearance of desktop entities such as title bars, application background, windows borders, and icons
Appearance
Display Options: Sets the display pattern and wallpaper
Background
Display Options: Sets visual parameters for icons and which icons to associate with desktop functions
Effects
Display Options: Sets up screen saver, controls screen saver parameters, and controls the energy-saving features of your display (if the display is energy-saver-compatible)
Screen Saver
Display Options: Sets up the color palette and pixel desktop area and is used to troubleshoot problems with display settings
Settings
Display Options: Sets the properties of Web page displays
Web
Folder Options: Sets up the active desktop and Web views, customizes how folders are opened, and determines if items are opened through a single or double click
General
Folder Options: Determines how files and folders are viewed, such as whether hidden files and folders are displayed and if certain file extensions are displayed
View
Folder Options: Enables you to associate a file type, such as an HTTP file (.htp)with a program that runs when you open the file, Internet Explorer for example
File Types
Folder Options: Enables you to set up network files shared by other computers so that you can access them offline by storing the files on the server and synchronizing the files between the server and network before logging off
Offline Files
Mouse Setup Options: Sets right-handed and left-handed options, single-click and double-click options plus the double-click speed
Buttons
Mouse Setup Options: Sets up a new mouse and driver and hardware resources, such as the IRQ
Hardware
Mouse Setup Options: Controls the mouse speed and acceleration, and sets the default "snap to" option
Motion
Mouse Setup Options: Customizes the pointer icons displayed with specific functions such as a busy or text select
Pointers
Keyboard Setup Options: Displays keyboard properties, installs a keyboard driver, and troubleshoots problems
Hardware
Keyboard Setup Options: Sets up language and other keyboard properties for locales that use different languages, such as English and Swedish
Input Locales
Keyboard Setup Options: Sets up keyboard characteristics such as repeat delay, repeat rate, and cursor blink rate
Speed
Documents, files, and other important information are permanently imprinted by a date stamp to record their creation date and time, and to record modification dates and times
date stamp
A computer or router that forwards a network communication from one network to another, acting as a gateway between networks
default gateway
A digital signature that Microsoft incorporates into driver and system files as a way to verify the files and to ensure that they are not inappropriately overwritten.
driver signing
A mode in which the computer components are shut down, and information in memory is automatically saved to disk before the disk is powered off. The power supply and CPU remain active, monitoring in order to startup all components when you press a key or move the mouse.
hibernate
A hardware line that a computer component, such as a disk drive or serial port, uses to communicate to the processor that it is ready to send or receive information. Intel-based computers have 16 IRQ lines, and 15 of those available for computer components to use.
interrupt request (IRQ) line
The address in memory through which data is transferred between a computer component and the processor.
I/O address
A standard multidimensioned graghics used in Microsoft's 3-D screen savers.
OpenGL
On a workstation or server, an IRQ, I/O address, or memory that is allocated to a computer component, such as a disk drive or communications port. On a Windows 2000 Server network, a resource is a file server, shared printer, or shared directory that can be accessed by users.
resource
An IPX/SPX-compatible protocol that is used by NetWare clients to identify servers and the network services provided by each server.
Service Advertising Protocol (SAP)
A mode in which the computer components are shut down and information in memory is cleared without automatically saving it to disk. The power supply and CPU remain active, waiting to start up all components when you press a key or move the mouse.
standby