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31 Cards in this Set

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Ille dux nescivit se imperium protinus suscepturum esse.
That leader did not know that he was about to take up command immediately.
"Quidam," inquit, "imperium quondam petebant et liberos viros opprimere cupiebant."
“Some,” he said, “once used to seek power and wish to oppress free men.”
Eodem die decem milia hostium ab duce fidelissimo aversa ac pulsa sunt; multi milites vulnera receperant et in agris iacebant.
On the same day, ten thousand of the enemy were turned away and driven out by the most loyal leader; many soldiers had received wounds and were lying in the fields.
Morte tyranni ferocis nuntiata, quisque se ad oratorem potentissimum magna spe vertit.
With the fierce tyrant’s death announced, each turned (himself) with great hope to the most capable orator.
Ridens, scriptor illius fabulae sapiens aliquid iucundius dehinc narravit.
Laughing, the wise author of that story then told something rather pleasant.
Note: "the comparative sometimes has the force of rather, indicating a greater degree of some quality than usual (lux clarior, a rather bright light).
His rebus auditis, adulescentes gemini propter pecuniae cupiditatem studium litterarum relinquent.
With these things heard, the twin young men will abandon the study of literature because of the desire for money.
Regina fortissima Carthaginis postea ostendit fidem semper esse sibi cariorem divitiis.
The very brave queen of Carthage afterwards showed that her faith was always dearer to herself than riches.
Note: "When the first element to be compared was in the nominative or accusative case, quam was often ommitted and the second element followed in the ablative case, the so-called 'ablative of comparison'."
Negavit se umquam vidisse servam fideliorem quam hanc.
She said that she had never seen a slave more trustworthy than this one.
Iucundior modus vitae hominibus nunc quaerendus est.
A more pleasant way of life must now be sought by men.
Note: passive periphrastic + dative of agent (p. 157)
Credimus illos viginti liberos viros feminasque vitam quam iucundissimam agere.
We believe that those twenty free men and women lead as pleasant a life as possible.
Imperator centum milites fortissimos prae se heri misit.
The emperor sent a hundred very strong soldiers before himself yesterday.
Lux in illa casa non fuit clarissima, quod familia paucas fenestras patefecerat.
The light in that house was not very bright, because the family had opened few windows.
Amicos tristes excepit, ad mensam invitavit, et eis perfugium ac solacium hic dedit.
He took his sad friends, invited them to the table, and gave them refuge and shelter here.
Quid dulcius vita iucundissima est?
What is sweeter than a very pleasant life?
Note: "When the first element to be compared was in the nominative or accusative case, quam was often ommitted and the second element followed in the ablative case, the so-called 'ablative of comparison'."
Quidam autem dicunt mortem esse dulciorem quam vitam.
Certain men, however, say that death is sweeter than life.
Ubi haec tria signa certissima nuntiata erant, a potentissimo duce consilium solaciumque petivimus.
When these three very sure signs had been reported, we sought advice and comfort from the most powerful leader.
Hac in fabula auctor narrat omnes quam beatissimas petere vitas.
In that story the author says that all men seek as happy lives as possible.
Note: "When quam precedes a superlative, it functions adverbially and indicates that the person/thing modified has the greatest possible degree of a particular quality" (p. 173).
Haec lux semper est clarior altera.
This light is always brighter than the other.
Senectus est loquacior. (Cicero)
Old age is quite talkative.
Note: "the comparative sometimes has the force of rather, indicating a greater degree of some quality than usual (lux clarior, a rather bright light).
Tua consilia omnia nobis clariora sunt quam lux. (Cicero)
All your plans are clearer to us than light.
Note: "When quam follows a comparative degree adjective it functions as a coordinating conjunction meaning than, linking two items that are being compared; the same case or construction follows quam as precedes" (p. 173).
Quaedam remedia graviora sunt quam ipsa pericula. (Seneca)
Some cures are graver than the dangers themselves.
Note: "When quam follows a comparative degree adjective it functions as a coordinating conjunction meaning than, linking two items that are being compared; the same case or construction follows quam as precedes" (p. 173).
Eo die viros fortissimos atque amantissimos rei publicae ad me vocavi. (Cicero)
On that day, I called the bravest and most patriotic (i.e. most loving of the fatherland) to me.
Qui imperia libens accepit, partem acerbissimam servitutis vitat. (Seneca)
A willing man who has accepted imperia avoids the harshest part of servitude.
Iucundissima dona, ut aiunt, semper sunt ea quae auctor ipse cara facit. (Ovid)
The most pleasant gifts, as they say, are always those which the giver himself makes
dear (to himself).
Beatus sapiensque vir forum vitat et superba limina potentiorum civium. (Horace)
A fortunate and wise man avoids the forum and the haughty thresholds of powerful citizens.
Quid est turpius quam ab aliquo illudi? (Cicero)
What is more shameful than to be deceived by someone?
Note: illudo, illudere, illusi, illusus -
mock, ridicule, speak mockingly of; fool, dupe; use for sexual pleasure
Quid enim est stultius quam incerta pro certis habere, falsa pro veris? (Cicero)
What truly is more foolish than to hold the unsure for the sure, the false for the true?
Saepe mihi dicis, carissime amice: "Scribe aliquid magnum; desidiosissimus homo es." (Martial)
O most dear friend, you often say to me: “Write something great; you are a most lazy man.”
Note 1: "only in the singular of -us nouns and adjectives of the second declension does the vocative ever differ in spelling from the nominative: singular amicus, amice, but plural amici, amici. Nouns in -ius (e.g. fillius, Vergillius) and the adj meus have a single -i in the vocative singular: mi fili, my son)" p. 19.
Note 2: desidiosus, -a, -um, lazy
Verba currunt; at manus notarii est velocior illis; non lingua mea, sed manus eius, laborem perfecit. (Martial)
Words move quickly; but a stenographer’s hand is swifter than those; not my tongue, but his hand, completes the work.
Multi putant res bellicas graviores esse quam res urbanas; sed haec sententia mutanda est, nam multae res urbanae sunt graviores clarioresque quam bellicae. (Cicero)
Many think that matters of war are more serious than matters of the city; but this opinion must be changed, for many matters of the city are more serious and more evident than those of war.
Invitatus ad cenam, manu sinistra lintea neglegentiorum sustulisti. Hoc salsum esse putas? Res sordidissima est! Itaque mihi linteum remitte. (Catullus)
Invited to dinner, with your left hand you took away the careless men’s napkins. You think this is witty? It is a very mean thing! And so return me my napkin.