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38 Cards in this Set

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"The result, then, is that more plentiful and better-quality goods are more easily produced if each person does one thing for which he is naturally suited, does it at the right time, and is released from having to do any of the others."
Plato

Republic
"They say that to do injustice is naturally good and to suffer injustice naturally bad, but that the badness of the suffering far it so far exceeds the goodness of doing it."
Plato

Republic
"If you were founding a city of pigs...he replied, wouldn't you fatten them on the same diet?
Plato

Republic
"Philosophy, spirit, speed and strength must all, then, but combined in the nature of anyone who is to be a fine and good guardian of our city."
Plato

Republic
"Because, unlike courage and wisdom, each of which resides in one part, making the city brave and wise respectively, moderation spreads throughout the whole. It makes the weakest, the strongest and those in between - whether in regard to reason, physical strength, numbers, wealth or anything else - all singe the same song together."
Plato

Republic
"Promiscuity is impious in a city of happy people, and the rulers won't allow it...it's clear that our next task must be to make marriage as sacred as possible. And the sacred marriages will be those that are most beneficial."
Plato

Republic
"As long as the campaign lasts, no one he wants to kiss shall be allowed to refuse, for then if one of them happens to be in love with another, whether male or female, he'll be all the more eager to win the rewards of valor."
Plato

Republic
"I am simply a stranger to the manner of speaking here...you would certainly excuse me if I spoke in that dialect and manner in which I had been brought up...for the excellence of a judge lies in this, as that of a speaker lies in telling the truth."
Plato's Apology
"__________ is guilty of wrongdoing in that he busies himself studying things in the sky and below the earth; he makes the worst argument into the stronger argument and he teaches others the same thing."
Plato's Apology
'What has caused my reputation is none other than a certain kind ofo wisdom."
Plato's Apology
"I shall call upon the god at Delphi as a witness to the existence and nature of my wisdom."
Plato's Apology
"What is probably, gentlemen, is that in fact the god is wise and that his oracular response meant that human wisdom is worth little or nothing."
Plato's Apology
"This man among you mortals, is wisest who...understands that his wisdom is worthless."
Plato's Apology
'These people are ambitious, violent, and numerous; they are continually and convincingly talking about me; they have filling your ears a long time ago with vehement slanders against me."
Plato's Apology
"I should have to be inordinately fond of life, men of Athens, to be so unreasonable as to suppose that other men will easily tolerate my company and conversation when you, my fellow citizens, have been unable to endure them, but found them a burden and resented them so that you are now seeking to get rid of them."
Plato's Apology
"we see that a city-state is a community of some sort, and that every community is established for the sake of good."
Aristotle

Politics
"female and male do for the same of procreation (they do not do some from deliberate choice but, like other animals and plants because the urge to leave behind something of the same kind of themselves is natural) and as a natural ruler and what is naturally ruled for the sake of survival."
Aristotle

Politics
"for the city-state is their end, and nature is an end; for we say that each thing's nature."
Aristotle

Politics
"since it is evident from what parts a city-state is constituted, we must first discuss household management, for every city-state is constituted from households. The parts of household management correspond in turns to the parts from which the household is constituted, a complete household consists of slaves and free."
Aristotle

Politics
"For free rules slaves, male rules females, and man rules child in different ways, because, while the parts of the soul are present within these people, they are present in different ways. The deliberative part of the soul is entirely missing from a slave; a woman has it, but it lacks authority; a child has it but it is incompletely developed."
Aristotle

Politics
"besides all these things, a statesman should know which constitution is more appropriate for all city-states."
Aristotle

Politics
"in addition to democracy and oligarchy, so-called polity arises, and how it should be established. at the same time, however, the defining principles of democracy and oligarchy will also become clear."
Aristotle

Politics
"and we distinguished two kinds of tyranny while we were investigating kingship, because their power somehow also overlaps with kinship, owing to the fact that both are based on law."
Aristotle

Politics
"What is the best constitution, and what is the best life for most city-states and most human beings, judging neither by a virtue that is beyond the reach of ordinary people, nor by a kind of education that requires natural gifts and resources that depend on luck, nor by the ideal constitution, but by a life that most people can share and a constitution in which most city-states can participate."
Aristotle

Politics
"It is also clear why a human being is more of a political animal than a bee or any other gregarious animal. Nature makes nothing pointlessly, as we say, and no animal has speech except a human being."
Aristotle

Politics
"And here are all the descendants of Iulus. Destined to come under heaven's great dome. And the man promised you ------ born of the Gods, who will establish a Golden Age.
Virgil

Aeneid
"The Greeks held the city gates. There was no hope of help. I yielded and, lifting up my father, sought the mountains."
Virgil

Aeneid
"The two heroes, weapons and spirits restored, One trusting his sword, both panting for breath. Stood face to face in the arena of War."
Virgil

Aeneid
"The troubled ghost of my father...admonishes me every night in my dreams when the darkness covers the earth, and the fiery stars rise. And my dear son...am I to wrong him by cheating him of his inheritance...his destined land?"
Virgil

Aeneid
"He is my brother and - deny it as you will - your brother too. No one will convict me as a traitor."
Sophocles

Antigone
"As I see it, whoever assumes the task, the awesome task of setting the city's course, and refuses to adopt the soundest policies but fearing someone, keeps his lips locked tight, he's utterly worthless. And whoever places a friend above the good of his own country, he is nothing."
Sophocles

Antigone
"Go down below and love, if love you must - love the dead! While I'm alive, no woman is going to lord it over me."
Sophocles

Antigone
"what a splendid king you'd make of a desert island - you and you alone."
Sophocles

Antigone
"Let the dead and the god of death bear witness! I have no love for a friend who loves in words alone."
Sophocles

Antigone
"Our wise man feels his troubles but overcomes them, while their wise man does not even feel them. We share with them the belief that the wise man is content with himself."
Seneca

Letters from a Stoic
"For no one is worth of a god unless he has paid dno heed to riches. I am not, mind you, against possessing them, but I want to ensure that you possess them without tremors; and this you will only achieve in one way, by convincing yourself that you can live a happy life even without them, and by always regarding them as being on the point of vanishing."
Seneca

Letters from a Stoic
"With afflictions of the spirit, though, the opposite is the case; the worse a person is, the less he feels it."
Seneca

Letters from a Stoic
"Once you have rid yourself of affliction...every change of scene will become a pleasure. You may be banished to the ends of the earth, and yet in whatever outlandish corner of the world you find yourself stationed, you will find that place...as hospitable home. We should live life without conviction: I wasn't born for one particular corner: the whole world is my home country."
Seneca

Letters from a Stoic