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98 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
mum
keep --- to say nothing about a subject>It's not official yet so keep ---.
roster
a list of people's names, often with the jobs they have been given to do>If you look on the duty -----, you'll see when you're working.
presage
to show or suggest that something, often something unpleasant, will happen>But still the economy is not showing signs of any of the excesses that normally ------ a recession.
malignant
describes a disease or a diseased growth that is likely to get uncontrollably worse and lead to death>Is the tumour --------- or benign?
benign
describes a growth that is not likely to cause death>a ------ tumour
oncology
the study and treatment of tumours (= masses of diseased cells) in the body
biopsy
the removal and examination of tissue from an ill person, in order to discover more about their illness>a tissue ------
whirlwind, twister
a tall column of spinning air which moves across the surface of the land or sea
hangar
a large building in which aircraft are kept
long-haul
travelling a long distance>a --------- flight
capsize
to (cause a boat or ship to) turn upside down accidentally while on water>A huge wave -------ed the yacht.
convoy
a group of vehicles or ships which travel together, especially for protection>A ----- of trucks containing supplies was sent to the famine area.
walkout
the act of leaving an official meeting as a group in order to show disapproval, or of leaving a place of work to start a strike>Senior union workers staged (= had) a ------- this afternoon at the annual conference over the proposed changes in funding.
bewilder
to confuse someone>The instructions completely --------ed me.
lug
to carry or pull something with effort or difficulty because it is heavy>I'm exhausted after ----ing these suitcases all the way across London.
picket
a worker or group of workers who protest outside a building to prevent other workers from going inside, especially because they have a disagreement with their employers>There were -----s outside the factory gates.
flier, flyer
a small piece of paper with information on it about a product or event
hut
a small, simple building, usually consisting of one room>a mountain ---
snatch
to take something or someone away by force>She had her purse ------ed (= stolen) while she was in town.
the bush
(especially in Australia and Africa) an area of land covered with bushes and trees which has never been farmed and where there are very few people
ransom
a large sum of money which is demanded in exchange for someone who has been taken prisoner, or sometimes for an animal>The gang held the racehorse to/for -----.
afflict
If a problem or illness ------s a person or thing, they suffer from it>It is an illness which -------s women more than men.
contentious
causing or likely to cause disagreement>She has some rather -------- views on education.
inception
the establishment of an organization or official activity>Since its ------- in 1968, the company has been at the forefront of computer development.
in the wake of
If something happens -- --- ---- -- something else, it happens after and often because of it>Airport security was extra tight -- --- ---- -- yesterday's bomb attacks.
rout
defeat>The battle/election was a complete and utter ----.
envisage, envision
to imagine or expect as a likely or desirable possibility in the future>train fare increases of 5% are ------ed for the next year.
prognosis
a statement of what is judged likely to happen in the future, especially in connection with a particular situation>I was reading a gloomy economic -------- in the paper this morning.
bleak
If a situation is bleak, there is little or no hope for the future>The economic outlook is -----.
reconcile
to find a way in which two situations or beliefs that are opposed to each other can agree and exist together>It is sometimes difficult to -------- science and religion.
fend off
to avoid dealing with something that is unpleasant or difficult to deal with>Somehow she managed to ---- --- the awkward questions.
spiral
If costs, prices, etc. ------, they increase faster and faster>-------ing costs have squeezed profits.
foot(informal)
to pay an amount of money>His parents ----ed the bill for his course fees.
stringent
having a very severe effect, or being extremely limiting>We need to introduce more -------- security measures such as identity cards.
amputee
a person who has had an arm or leg cut off
consensual
with the willing agreement of all the people involved>The woman alleged rape, but Reeves insisted it was --------.
trump
to beat someone or something by doing or producing something better>Their million-pound bid for the company was -----ed at the last moment by an offer for almost twice as much from their main competitor.
nefarious
(especially of activities) evil or immoral>The director of the company seems to have been involved in some -------- practices/activities.
hatch
to make a plan, especially a secret plan>It was in August of 1978 that the Bolton brothers -----ed their plot to kill their parents.
irony
a situation in which something which was intended to have a particular result has the opposite or a very different result>The ----- (of it) is that the new tax system will burden those it was intended to help.
escort
someone, often a young woman, who is paid to go out to social events with another person>He hired an ----- girl to go to the dinner with him.
hypocrisy
when someone pretends to believe something that they do not really believe or that is the opposite of what they do or say at another time>There's one rule for her and another rule for everyone else and it's sheer -------.
seclusion
when someone is alone, away from other people>He's been living in ------- since he retired from acting.
racket
a dishonest or illegal activity that makes money>They were jailed for running a protection/prostitution -----.
entangle
involved with something or someone in a way that makes it difficult to escape>He went to the shop to buy bread, and got -------- in/with a carnival parade.
patronise
to speak to or behave towards someone as if they are stupid or unimportant>Stop -------ing me - I understand the play as well as you do.
come clean
to tell the truth about something that you have been keeping secret>I thought it was time to ---- ----- (with everybody) about what I'd been doing.
pitch
a speech or act which attempts to persuade someone to buy or do something>She made a ----- for the job but she didn't get it.
preach
(especially of a priest in a church) to give a religious speech>Father Martin -----ed to the assembled mourners.
purport
to pretend to be or to do something, especially in a way that is not easy to believe>The tape recording ------s to be of a conversation between the princess and a secret admirer.
treble
three times greater in amount, number or size>He earns almost ------ the amount that I do.
baron
an extremely powerful person in a particular area of business>media/press -----s
a drug -----
cartel
a group of similar independent companies who join together to control prices and limit competition>an oil -----
dismantle
to take a machine apart or to come apart into separate pieces>She -------ed the washing machine to see what the problem was, but couldn't put it back together again.
negotiate
to manage to travel along a difficult route>The only way to -------- the muddy hillside is on foot.
sparse
small in numbers or amount, often scattered over a large area>a -----population/audience
------- vegetation/woodland
outlast
to live or exist, or to stay energetic and determined, longer than another person or thing>The queen ------ed all her children.
assuage
to make unpleasant feelings less strong>The government has tried to ------- the public's fears.
comatose
in a coma
snowflakes
a small piece of snow
lewd
(of behaviour, speech, dress, etc.) sexual in an obvious and rude way>Ignore him - he's being ----.
a ---- suggestion
gluten
a protein which is contained in wheat and some other grains>a -------free diet
tsar, czar
a person who has been given special powers by the government to deal with a particular matter>The government has appointed a drugs ---- to co-ordinate the fight against drug abuse.
culprit
someone who has done something wrong>Police hope the public will help them to find the ------s.
crumble
to break, or cause something to break, into small pieces>She nervously -----ed the bread between her fingers.
preferential
describes something you are given which is better than what other people receive>Inmates claimed that some prisoners had received --------- treatment.
rug
a piece of thick heavy cloth smaller than a carpet, used for covering the floor or for decoration>My dog loves lying on the --- in front of the fire.
murky
describes a situation that is complicated and unpleasant, and about which many facts are unclear>He became involved in the ----- world of international drug-dealing.
pluralism
the existence of different types of people, who have different beliefs and opinions, within the same society>fter years of state control, the country is now moving towards political/religious/cultural --------.
rupture
to (cause to) burst, break or tear>His appendix ------ed and he had to be rushed to hospital.
sweltering
extremely and uncomfortably hot>In the summer, it's --------- in the smaller classrooms.
stipend
a fixed regular income>an annual ------
invoke
to request or use a power outside yourself, especially a law or a god, to help you when you want to improve a situation>Police can ------ the law of trespass to regulate access to these places.
placard
a large piece of card, paper, etc. with a message written or printed on it, often carried in public places by people who are complaining about something>Demonstrators marched past holding/waving -------s that said, 'Send food, not missiles'.
frail
weak or unhealthy, or easily damaged, broken or harmed>a ----- old lady
reparation
payment for harm or damage>The company had to make --------- to those who suffered ill health as a result of chemical pollution.
blight
something which spoils or has a very bad effect on something, often for a long time>His arrival cast a ----- on the wedding day.
derisory
describes an amount that is so small it is ridiculous>We were awarded a ------- sum.
unease
anxiety>Growing ----- at the prospect of an election is causing fierce arguments within the party.
menace
If someone or something ------s a person or thing, they threaten seriously to harm it>Hurricane Hugo -----ed the US coast for a week.
errant
behaving wrongly in some way, especially by leaving home>an ----- husband
----- children
astray
away from the correct path or correct way of doing something>The letter must have gone ----- in the post.
sabotage
to damage or destroy equipment, weapons or buildings in order to prevent the success of an enemy or competitor>The rebels had tried to ------- the oil pipeline.
prelate
an official of high rank in the Christian religion, such as a bishop or an abbot
exquisite
very beautiful; delicate>an -------- piece of china
Look at this ------ painting
gait
a particular way of walking>He walked with a slow stiff ----.
brazen
obvious, without any attempt to be hidden>There were instances of ------ cheating in the exams.
repression
when people are controlled severely, especially by force>The political --------- in this country is enforced by terror.
flagrant
(of a bad action, situation, person, etc.) shocking because of being so obvious>a ------- misuse of funds/privilege
a ------- breach of trust
bellicose
wishing to fight or start a war>The general made some --------- statements about his country's military strength.
antics
amusing, silly or strange behaviour>The crowds were once again entertained by the number one tennis player's ----- on and off the court.
iron-clad
very certain and unlikely to be changed>-------- rules
demure
(especially of women and children) quiet and well behaved>She gave him a ------- smile.
cull
When people ---- animals, they kill them, especially the weaker members of a particular group of them, in order to reduce or limit their number>The plan to ---- large numbers of baby seals has angered environmental groups.
pyre
a large pile of wood on which a dead body is burnt in some parts of the world>A traditional Indian custom used to involve widows burning themselves alive on their husbands' funeral ----s.
comb
to search a place or an area very carefully in order to find something>The police ----ed the whole area for evidence.
gnarled
rough and twisted, especially because of old age or a lack of protection from bad weather>a ------ tree trunk
interstate
a fast wide road which goes between states and connects important cities in the United States