Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/43

Click to flip

43 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Nativists
anti-immigrant sentiment. socio-political positions taken up by those who identify themselves as "native-born"
Native American Association:
Party formed by the Indians.
Know-Nothings:
a nativist American political movement of the 1850s
"water power towns"
Used near a river or stream to energize their town
Gov. DeWitt Clinton
Mayor of New York City and Governor of New York State. Father of the Erie Canal
Erie Canal:
runs from the Hudson River, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean.
"Tom Thumb":
First Steam Engine: Experimented 1829 by Elicott Mill
Samuel F. B. Morse
: an American inventor, and painter of portraits and historic scenes
Charles River Bridge v. Warren Bridge (1837):
charter by the state of Massachusetts to operate a toll bridge
corporation:
: a business or organization formed by a group of people, and it has rights and liabilities separate from those of the individuals involved.
Limited liability:
: A business structure that is a hybrid of a partnership and a corporation. Its owners are shielded from personal liability and all profits and losses pass directly to the owners without taxation of the entity itself.
"Putting-out" system
: a popular system of cloth production in Europe.
Lowell or Waltham System
: paternalistic textile factory system of the early 19th century that relied almost exclusively on young, unmarried women laborers
Lowell Girls:
women who worked in the Paternalistic Textile factory
Factory Girls Association:
one of the first American labor organizations organized by and for women
"express contract":
a contract in which all elements are specifically stated, and the terms are stated
Commonwealth v. Hunt (1842):
not inherently illegal for workers to organize a union of try to compel recognition of that union by means of a strike.
"Cult of Domesticity":
a woman's role in marriage was to Maintain the home as a refuge for her husband, Train the children, Set a moral example for children to follow
Oberlin College
: a small liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio. It was founded in 1833
Mary Lyon
: the founder of the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley
Godey's Lady's Book:
a popular United States magazine among women. In the 1860s Godey's considered itself the "queen of monthlies."
minstrels:
An indigenous form of American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, usually performed by white people in blackface
P. T. Barnum:
: remembered for his entertaining hoaxes and for founding the circus that eventually became Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus.
John Deere:
developed the world's first commercially successful, self-scouring steel plow, closely parallels the settlement and development of the Midwestern United States
Cyrus H. McCormick
: inventor of the mechanical reaper in 1831
Romanticism:
an artistic and intellectual movement in the history of ideas that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. Stressed strong emotion
Hudson River School:
encompasses two generations of painters inspired by Thomas Cole's, awesomely Romantic images of America's wilderness
James Fennimore Cooper:
best known for his stories of frontier life and pioneer adventure. His most popular work is The Last of the Mohicans(1832)
Herman Melville
: best known for his novels of the sea and especially for his masterpiece Moby Dick (1851)
Edgar Allen Poe:
: American poet, a master of the horror tale, credited with practically inventing the detective story.
Transcendentalism:
A loose collection of eclectic ideas about literature, philosophy, religion, social reform, and the general state of American culture
Ralph Waldo Emerson:
: a major American poet, philosopher and center of the American Transcendental movement.
Self-Reliance:
the first or only exposure students get to Emerson's thought
Henry David Thoreau:
was an American essayist, poet, and practical philosopher, best-known for his autobiographical story of life in the woods, Walden
Walden:
: by Henry David Thoreau is one of the best-known non-fiction books written by an American. Published in 1854
On Civil Disobedience:
encompasses the active refusal to obey certain laws, demands and commands of a government or of an occupying power without resorting to physical violence
utopian socialism:
: the first currents of modern Socialist thought
communitarianism
A member or supporter of a small cooperative or a collectivist community.
Brook Farm:
a transcendentalist Utopian experiment, was put into practice by transcendentalist former Unitarian minister George Ripley at a farm in West Roxbury, Massachusetts, at that time nine miles from Boston
George Ripley:
minister of the Purchase Street Church in Boston, 1826-41, was a central figure in the Transcendentalist movement of the 1830s and 40s, a founder in 1841 of the Brook Farm commune
Robert Owen:
a Welsh social reformer. He is considered the "Father" of the cooperative movement.
New Harmony:
town located in Posey County, Indiana
John Humphrey Noyes:
1811-86, American reformer, founder of the Oneida community, b. Brattleboro