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30 Cards in this Set

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cognate
1. Related by blood; having a common ancestor.
2. Related in origin, as certain words in genetically related languages descended from the same ancestral root; for example, English name and Latin n men from Indo-European *n -men-.
3. Related or analogous in nature, character, or function.
inflection
1. The act of inflecting or the state of being inflected.
2. Alteration in pitch or tone of the voice.
3. Grammar.
a. An alteration of the form of a word by the addition of an affix, as in English dogs from dog, or by changing the form of a base, as in English spoke from speak, that indicates grammatical features such as number, person, mood, or tense.
b. An affix indicating such a grammatical feature, as the -s in the English third person singular verb form speaks.
c. The paradigm of a word.
d. A pattern of forming paradigms, such as noun inflection or verb inflection.
4. A turning or bending away from a course or position of alignment
orthography
1. The art or study of correct spelling according to established usage.
2. The aspect of language study concerned with letters and their sequences in words.
3. A method of representing a language or the sounds of language by written symbols; spelling
paradigm
1. One that serves as a pattern or model.
2. A set or list of all the inflectional forms of a word or of one of its grammatical categories: the paradigm of an irregular verb.
3. A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline.
philology
Literary study or classical scholarship.
phonology
1. The study of speech sounds in language or a language with reference to their distribution and patterning and to tacit rules governing pronunciation.
2. The sound system of a language: the phonology of English
rejoinder
an answer
rhetoric
a. The art or study of using language effectively and persuasively.
b. A treatise or book discussing this art.
2. Skill in using language effectively and persuasively.
3.
a. A style of speaking or writing, especially the language of a particular subject: fiery political rhetoric.
b. Language that is elaborate, pretentious, insincere, or intellectually vacuous: His offers of compromise were mere rhetoric.
4. Verbal communication; discourse.
succinct
1. Characterized by clear, precise expression in few words; concise and terse: a succinct reply; a succinct style.
2. Archaic. Encircled as if by a girdle; girded.
syntax
a. The study of the rules whereby words or other elements of sentence structure are combined to form grammatical sentences.
b. A publication, such as a book, that presents such rules.
c. The pattern of formation of sentences or phrases in a language.
d. Such a pattern in a particular sentence or discourse.
2. Computer Science. The rules governing the formation of statements in a programming language.
3. A systematic, orderly arrangement
bellicose
Warlike in manner or temperament; pugnacious. See Synonyms at belligerent.
Censure
1. An expression of strong disapproval or harsh criticism.
2. An official rebuke, as by a legislature of one of its members.
Censure
1. Given to contention; quarrelsome. See Synonyms at argumentative. See Synonyms at belligerent.
2. Involving or likely to cause contention; controversial: “a central and contentious element of the book” (Tim W. Ferguson
contentious
1. A scarce supply; a lack: “the dearth of uncensored, firsthand information about the war” (Richard Zoglin).
2. Shortage of food; famine.
dearth
Having a harmful effect; injurious: the deleterious effects of smoking.
Enervating
1. To weaken or destroy the strength or vitality of: “the luxury which enervates and destroys nations” (Henry David Thoreau). See Synonyms at deplete.
2. Medicine. To remove a nerve or part of a nerve.
deleterious
Having a harmful effect; injurious: the deleterious effects of smoking.
enervating
1. To weaken or destroy the strength or vitality of: “the luxury which enervates and destroys nations” (Henry David Thoreau). See Synonyms at deplete.
2. Medicine. To remove a nerve or part of a nerve.
ephemeral
1. Lasting for a markedly brief time: “There remain some truths too ephemeral to be captured in the cold pages of a court transcript” (Irving R. Kaufman).
2. Living or lasting only for a day, as certain plants or insects do.
florid
1. Flushed with rosy color; ruddy.
2. Very ornate; flowery: a florid prose style.
3. Archaic. Healthy.
4. Obsolete. Abounding in or covered with flowers
hackneyed
Overfamiliar through overuse; trite.
tableau
1. A vivid or graphic description: The movie was a tableau of a soldier's life.
2. A striking incidental scene, as of a picturesque group of people: “New public figures suddenly abound in the hitherto faceless totalitarian tableaux” (John McLaughlin).
3. An interlude during a scene when all the performers on stage freeze in position and then resume action as before.
4. A tableau vivant.
anomaly
1. Deviation or departure from the normal or common order, form, or rule.
2. One that is peculiar, irregular, abnormal, or difficult to classify: “Both men are anomalies: they have... likable personalities but each has made his reputation as a heavy” (David Pauly).
3. Astronomy. The angular deviation, as observed from the sun, of a planet from its perihelion
tableau
1. A vivid or graphic description: The movie was a tableau of a soldier's life.
2. A striking incidental scene, as of a picturesque group of people: “New public figures suddenly abound in the hitherto faceless totalitarian tableaux” (John McLaughlin).
3. An interlude during a scene when all the performers on stage freeze in position and then resume action as before.
4. A tableau vivant.
august
1. Inspiring awe or admiration; majestic: the august presence of the monarch. See Synonyms at grand.
2. Venerable for reasons of age or high rank.
sibilance
Of, characterized by, or producing a hissing sound like that of (s) or (sh): the sibilant consonants; a sibilant bird call.
myriad
1. Constituting a very large, indefinite number; innumerable: the myriad fish in the ocean.
2. Composed of numerous diverse elements or facets: the myriad life of the mtropolis.
3. n.
1. A vast number: the myriads of bees in the hive.
2. Archaic. Ten thousand.
penurious
1. Unwilling to spend money; stingy.
2. Yielding little; barren: a penurious land.
3. Poverty-stricken; destitute.
portentous
1. Of the nature of or constituting a portent; foreboding: “The present aspect of society is portentous of great change” (Edward Bellamy).
2. Full of unspecifiable significance; exciting wonder and awe: “Such a portentous and mysterious monster roused all my curiosity” (Herman Melville).
3. Marked by pompousness; pretentiously weighty
travail
1. Work, especially when arduous or involving painful effort; toil. See Synonyms at work.
2. Tribulation or agony; anguish.
3. The labor of childbirth.
approbation
1. An expression of warm approval; praise.
2. Official approval.
vanquish
a. To defeat or conquer in battle; subjugate.
b. To defeat in a contest, conflict, or competition.
2. To overcome or subdue (an emotion, for example); suppress: “She had had to wrench herself forcibly away from Katharine, and every step vanquished her desire” (Virginia Woolf). See Synonyms at defeat.