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11 Cards in this Set

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FVR-Viral Rhinotracheitis-
A common respiratory infection of cats which can be fatal in kittens. Sneezing,decreased appetite, and fever,followed by a thick discharge from the eyes and nose, are often observed.
FCV- Calicivirus
An upper respiratory infection of cats with signs similar to FVR. In addition, ulcers may be seen on the tongue and mouth. FVR and FCV account for up to 90% of all respiratory infections in cats.
FPL- Panleukopenia
A widespread and potentially fatal disease which may cause a sudden onset of severe vomiting and diarhea. It is especially dangerous in kittens, but fatalities can occur in adult cats.
FPN- Pneumonitis Chlamydia
common respiratory infection in cats producing sneezing,fever and a thick discharge from the eyes. Chlamydial infection may be associated with the development of more serious bacterial complications.
FVR-Viral Rhinotracheitis-
A common respiratory infection of cats which can be fatal in kittens. Sneezing,decreased appetite, and fever,followed by a thick discharge from the eyes and nose, are often observed.
FCV- Calicivirus
An upper respiratory infection of cats with signs similar to FVR. ulcers may be seen on the tongue and mouth. FVR and FCV account for up to 90% of all respiratory infections in cats.
Felv- Leukemia
This virus can cause serious disease & death in cats. decreases the ability of the immune system to respond to infection & may lead to development of different types of cancer. Felv is passed from cat to cat by direct contact. outside cats & cats in multi-cat households are at especially high risk. not contagious to people.
FIP- Infectious Peritonitis
most dramatic sign of FIP is an enlarged fluid-filled abdomen. Cats may also show neurological signs or eye inflammation.
Rabies
A fatal viral infection of the central nervous system that can affect all mammals, including humans. The virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Routine vaccination is the key to controlling this dreaded disease.
Core vaccines
Start FVRCP at 6-8 weeks and repeat at 9-11 and 12-16 depending on when the kitten comes in for vaccines. The Rabies vaccine is given at 12 weeks old. Vaccines to be repeated yearly up to 3 years depending on vaccine protocol.
Non-core vaccines
Felv can be given at 8-11 weeks old with one other booster in 3-4 weeks. FIP and FIV. Vaccines to be repeated yearly up to 3 years depending on vaccine protocol.