• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/14

Click to flip

14 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Offshore Salvage is
The refloating of ships stranded or sunk
in exposed coastal waters is called offshore or coastwise salvage.
Harbor Salvage is
The salvage of ships stranded or sunk in sheltered waters.
Cargo and equipment salvage is
The cargo may pose an environmental
hazard or may include critical war materials, sensitive military items,
machinery, or weapons mounts that may need to be removed in a
timely fashion. This was the case on the battleships ARIZONA and
UTAH at Pearl Harbor during WWII.
Wreck removal
Removal of hazardous or unsightly wrecks
that have little or no salvage value provides salvors with many
options. Wrecks are refloated or removed by the most feasible
method available, without regard for the salvage value of the wreck.
Afloat salvage is
The salvage of a vessel that is damaged but
still afloat is called afloat salvage. This type of salvage requires
unique services. Assisting in the damage control efforts aboard the
ship is the first and most useful service that can be rendered by the
salvor.
Clearance salvage refers to
the coordinated
removal or salvage of numerous casualties in a harbor or waterway.
Harbor clearance typically follows a catastrophic event such as
sabotage or an intentional bombing within a port or a severe natural
event such as a tsunami or hurricane
When
blocking a harbor, it is the enemy’s purpose to make its clearance as
difficult, dangerous, and time-consuming as possible this is done by...
skillfully
blocking harbor, in which wrecks will be stacked one above the other, mined,
booby-trapped, and damaged in ways that make their removal
difficult.
Individual salvage plans are developed for each ship to be cleared.
These plans have two parts:
the main body and the supporting
annexes
Initial Overall Surveys.
• Inventory the ships to be salvaged or cleared
• Categorize them by condition
• Establish priority for their clearance
• Determine the general technique and type of equipment to be
employed.
Survey Breakdown
Preliminary
• Detailed Surveys
(1) Topside
(2) Interior hull (including machinery)
(3) Diving and exterior hull
(4) Hydrographic
(5) Site safety
(6) Cargo
(7) Pollution potential.
Detailed Survey Form. This includes information on the following
areas:
• Topside
• Interior hull (including machinery)
• Diving and exterior hull
• Hydrographic
• Safety.
The specific information gathered in the preliminary survey
• Date, time, name and type of casualty
• Location (lat/lon and positioning source of information, chart)
• Builder, owner and age of casualty
• Nearest port and nearest U.S. or support Allied Naval facility
• Extent and type of damage to the ship forward, amidships and
aft drafts and tide state at time of observation
• Crew status
• Point of contact
• Solid cargo (type, cargo list or manifest, location and amount)
• Hazardous materials (spill likely?) or ammunition onboard
• Status of liquid loading (fuel, fresh water, ballast, other)
• Displacement, tonnage
• Status of ships machinery
• Weather conditions, current and forecast: wind (direction and
speed), precipitation, temperature
A good salvage plan:
• Takes personnel safety into consideration
• Coordinates harbor clearance work with operational
requirements of port users and other work in progress in the port
• Includes work schedules
• Includes cost estimates
• Identifies, assigns, and schedules resources
• Is dynamic and subject to constant revision
• Identifies areas of weakness
• Is the responsibility of, and is approved by, the senior salvage
officer.
Following the operation, reports are prepared in compliance with
Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command Instruction 4740.8
(series) and other current directives. The reports are used as:
• Historical records of operations
• Training documents
• A basis for reimbursement of participating units for equipment
losses and out-of-pocket expenses
• A basis for claiming reimbursement to the Navy for operations
undertaken for other Government agencies, foreign governments,
or commercial interests.
A sound salvage plan, a well-executed operation, and a correctly
prepared report are hallmarks of professionalism.