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13 Cards in this Set

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According to Shakespeare, "in Antony & Cleopatra, we are presented with a hero and heroine of grand stature who are undone by their transcendent love and devotion to one another." Do you agree or disagree? (This quote is from the USAD packet.)
Source: USAD Lang/Lit Packet - 7.1.2
According to George Bernard Shaw, "Shakespeare's Antony & Cleopatra must be as intolerable to the true Puritan as it is distressing to the ordinary healthy citizen, because, after giving a faithful picture of the soldier broken down by debauchery, and the typical wanton in whose arms such men perish, Shakespeare finally strains all his huge command of rhetoric and stage pathos to give a theatrical sublimity to the wretched end of the business, and to persuade foolish spectators that the world was well lost by the twain." Do you agree or disagree?
Source: USAD Lang/Lit Packet - 9.1.5
Compare and contrast the following opinions of Shakespeare's Antony & Cleopatra.

Shakespeare:"We are presented with a hero and heroine of grand stature who are undone by their transcendent love and devotion to one another."

George Bernard Shaw: "Shakespeare's Antony & Cleopatra must be as intolerable to the true Puritan as it is distressing to the ordinary healthy citizen, because, after giving a faithful picture of the soldier broken down by debauchery, and the typical wanton in whose arms such men perish, Shakespeare finally strains all his huge command of rhetoric and stage pathos to give a theatrical sublimity to the wretched end of the business, and to persuade foolish spectators that the world was well lost by the twain."
Source: USAD Lang/Lit Packet - 7.1.2 and 9.1.5
One of the strongest human drives seems to be a desire for power. Write an essay in which you discuss how a character in Much Ado About Nothing or Antony & Cleopatra struggles to free himself or herself from the power of others or seeks to gain power over others. Be sure to demonstrate in your essay hot the author uses this power struggle to enhance the meaning of the work.
Source: AP English Lit Exam 2005 FRQ, Form B
Critic Roland Barthes has said, "Literature is a question minus the answer." Choose one of the novels or plays selected this year and, considering Barthes' observation, write an essay in which you analyze a central question the work raises and the extent to which it offers any answers. Explain how the author's treatment of this question affects your understanding of the world as a whole. Avoid mere plot summary.
Source: AP English Lit Exam 2004 FRQ, Form A
The most important themes in literature are sometimes developed in scenes in which a death or deaths take place. Choose a novel or play and write a well-organized essay in which you show how a specific death scene helps to illuminate the meaning of the work as a whole. Avoid mere plot summary.
Source: AP English Lit Exam 2004 FRQ, Form B
According to critic Northrop Frye, "Tragic heroes are so much the highest points in their human landscape that they seem the inevitable conductors of the power about them, great trees more likely to be struck by lightning than a clump of grass. Conductors may of course be instruments as well as victims of divine lightning."

Select a novel or play in which a tragic figure functions as an instrument of the suffering of others. Then write an essay in which you explain how the suffering brought upon by others by that figure contributes to the tragic vision of the work as a whole. Avoid mere plot summary.
Source: AP English Lit Exam 2003 FRQ, Form A
Novels and plays often depict characters caught between colliding cultures--national, regional, ethnic, religious, institutional. Such collisions can call a character's sense of identity into question. Select a novel or play in which a character responds to such a cultural collision. Then write a well-organized essay in which you describe the character's response and explain its relevance to the work as a whole. Avoid mere plot summary.
Source: AP English Lit Exam 2003 FRQ, Form B
Often in literature a character's success in achieving goals depends on keeping a secret and divulging it only at the right moment, if at all.

Choose a novel or play that requires a character to keep a secret. In a well-organized essay, briefly explain the necessity for secrecy and how the character's choice to reveal or keep the secret affects the plot and contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. DO NOT write about a short story, poem or film.
Source: AP English Lit Exam 2002 FRQ, From B
The eighteenth-century British novelist Laurence Sterne wrote, "No body, but he who as felt it, can conceive what a plaguing thing it is to have a man's mind torn asunder by two projects of equal strength, both obstinately pulling in a contrary direction at the same time."

From a novel or play choose a character (not necessarily the protagonist) whose mind is pulled in conflicting directions by two compelling desires, ambitions, obligations, or influences. Then, in a well-organized essay, identify each of the two conflicting forces and explain how this conflict within one character illuminate the meaning of the work as a whole.
Source: AP English Lit Exam 1999 FRQ
Should Antony & Cleopatra be considered in the same category as the four great tragedies?
Source: USAD 10.2.7
It has been suggested that tragedies are for those who feel and comedies are for those who think. Is this true?
Source: USAD 11.1.3
George Meredith commented that "the true test of comedy is that it shall awaken thoughtful laughter." In this sense, is Much Ado About Nothing a comedy?
Source: USAD 11.1.3