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54 Cards in this Set

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a form of necessary loss and includes all normally expected life changes across the life span. Ex: a mother feels loss when her child leaves home for the first day of school.
maturational loss
loss that is unnecessary and not part of the expected maturation experiences. Ex: a automobile accident causes injuries that prevents a person from continuing with life goals
situational loss
a loss that occurs when a person can no longer feel, hear, or know a person or object. Ex: loss of body part, death, or loss of job.
acutal loss
the emotional response to a loss, manifested in ways unique to an individual, based on person experiences, cultural expectations, and spirtual beliefs.
grief
an outward, social expression of grief and the behaviors associated with loss
mourning
captures both grief and mourning and includes the emotional responses and outward behaviors of a person experiencing loss
bereavement
most common reaction to death
normal grief
the grieving person has a prolonged or significantly difficult time moving forward after a loss
complicated (dysfunctional) grief
the unconscious process of disengaging or "letting go" before the actual loss or death occurs, especially in situations of prolonged or predicted loss.
anticipatory grief
this type of grief occurs when their relationship to the deceased person is not socially sanctioned, cannot be openly achknowledged or publicly shared, or seems of lesser significance. Ex: death of ex-spouse, loved pet, or old person.
disenfranchised grief
a form of necessary loss and includes all normally expected life changes across the life span. Ex: a mother feels loss when her child leaves home for the first day of school.
maturational loss
loss that is unnecessary and not part of the expected maturation experiences. Ex: a automobile accident causes injuries that prevents a person from continuing with life goals
situational loss
a loss that occurs when a person can no longer feel, hear, or know a person or object. Ex: loss of body part, death, or loss of job.
acutal loss
the emotional response to a loss, manifested in ways unique to an individual, based on person experiences, cultural expectations, and spirtual beliefs.
grief
an outward, social expression of grief and the behaviors associated with loss
mourning
captures both grief and mourning and includes the emotional responses and outward behaviors of a person experiencing loss
bereavement
most common reaction to death
normal grief
the grieving person has a prolonged or significantly difficult time moving forward after a loss
complicated (dysfunctional) grief
the unconscious process of disengaging or "letting go" before the actual loss or death occurs, especially in situations of prolonged or predicted loss.
anticipatory grief
this type of grief occurs when their relationship to the deceased person is not socially sanctioned, cannot be openly achknowledged or publicly shared, or seems of lesser significance. Ex: death of ex-spouse, loved pet, or old person.
disenfranchised grief
Kubler-Ross' Stages of Dying:
Denial
Anger
Bargaining
Depression
Acceptance
What occurs in each stage?
Denial: a person acts as though nothing has happened or refuses to accept the fact of the loss
Anger: a person expresses resistance and sometimes feels intense anger at God, other people, or the situation.
Bargaining: cushions and postpones awareness of the loss by trying to prevent it from happening.
Depression: occurs when the person realizes the full impact of the loss.
Acceptance: the person incorporates the loss into life and finds ways to move forward.
Bowlby's Attachment Theory:
Numbing
Yearning and Searching
Disorganization and Despair
Reorganization
What occurs in each stage?
Numbing: person feels "stunned" or "unreal;" it protects the person from the full impact.
Yearning and Searching: emotional outbursts of sobbing and acute distress; tightening of chest and throat, shortness of breath, lethargy, loss of appetite
Disorganization and Despair: the person endlessly examines how and why the loss occurred or expresses anger at anyone who seems responsible for the loss.
Reorganization: the person begins to accept change, assume unfamiliar roles, acquire new skills, and build new relationships.
Worden's Tasks of Mourning:
I: Accept the reality of the loss.
II: Work through the pain of grief
III: Adjust to the environment in which the deceased is missing.
IV: Emtionally relocate the deceased and move on with life.
What is the Worden's theory about mourning?
suggests that morning persons actively engage in behaviors to help themselves and respond to outside interventions.
when an individual comes to terms with his or her life and puts life's pieces together in a way consistent with one's entire life.
spiritual integration
a prevention, relief, reduction, or soothing of symptoms of disease or disorders throughout the entire course of an illness, including care of the dying and bereavement follow-up of the family is what kind of care?
palliative care
a philosphy and model for the care of terminally ill client's and their families is what kind of care?
hospice care
care of the body after death is called?
postmortem care
disruptive forces operating within or on any system
stressors
how people interpret the impact of the tre stressor on themselves, of what is happening, and what they are able to do about it.
appraisal
a reaction that prepares a person for action by increasing HR, diverting blood from the intesstines to the brain and striated muscles; and increasing BP, RR, and blood glucose levels.
flight or fight response
Kubler-Ross' Stages of Dying:
Denial
Anger
Bargaining
Depression
Acceptance
What occurs in each stage?
Denial: a person acts as though nothing has happened or refuses to accept the fact of the loss
Anger: a person expresses resistance and sometimes feels intense anger at God, other people, or the situation.
Bargaining: cushions and postpones awareness of the loss by trying to prevent it from happening.
Depression: occurs when the person realizes the full impact of the loss.
Acceptance: the person incorporates the loss into life and finds ways to move forward.
Bowlby's Attachment Theory:
Numbing
Yearning and Searching
Disorganization and Despair
Reorganization
What occurs in each stage?
Numbing: person feels "stunned" or "unreal;" it protects the person from the full impact.
Yearning and Searching: emotional outbursts of sobbing and acute distress; tightening of chest and throat, shortness of breath, lethargy, loss of appetite
Disorganization and Despair: the person endlessly examines how and why the loss occurred or expresses anger at anyone who seems responsible for the loss.
Reorganization: the person begins to accept change, assume unfamiliar roles, acquire new skills, and build new relationships.
Worden's Tasks of Mourning:
I: Accept the reality of the loss.
II: Work through the pain of grief
III: Adjust to the environment in which the deceased is missing.
IV: Emtionally relocate the deceased and move on with life.
What is the Worden's theory about mourning?
suggests that morning persons actively engage in behaviors to help themselves and respond to outside interventions.
when an individual comes to terms with his or her life and puts life's pieces together in a way consistent with one's entire life.
spiritual integration
a prevention, relief, reduction, or soothing of symptoms of disease or disorders throughout the entire course of an illness, including care of the dying and bereavement follow-up of the family is what kind of care?
palliative care
a philosphy and model for the care of terminally ill client's and their families is what kind of care?
hospice care
care of the body after death is called?
postmortem care
disruptive forces operating within or on any system
stressors
how people interpret the impact of the tre stressor on themselves, of what is happening, and what they are able to do about it.
appraisal
a reaction that prepares a person for action by increasing HR, diverting blood from the intesstines to the brain and striated muscles; and increasing BP, RR, and blood glucose levels.
flight or fight response
What does the medulla oblongata control?
HR, BP, and Respirations. Impluses traveling to and from the medulla oblongata increases or decrease these vital signs
What does the reticular formation do?
continuously monitors the physiological status of the body through connections with sensory and motor tracts.
What does the pituitary gland do?
produces hormones necessary for adaptions to stress, such as ACTH which turns into cortisol. When hormones levels drop, the pituitary gland receives a message to increase hormone secretion and vice versa.
The General Adaption Syndrome is a three-stage reaction. What are the three stages?
Alarm reaction
Resistance stage
Exhausion stage
What happens in the alarm reaction of GAS?
rising hormone levels result in increased blood volume, blood glucose levels, epinephrine, and norepinephrine amounts, HR, blood flow to muscles, oxygen intake, mental alertness, and pupils dilate. Can last from 1 min to many hours.
What happens in the resistance stage of GAS?
Hormone levels, GR, BP, and cardiace output return to normal, and they body repairs any damage that has occured.
What happens in the exhaustion stage of GAS?
they physiological response has intensified, but with a compromised energy level, the person's adaptation to the stressor diminishes. The body cannot defend itself, phys. regulation diminishes, and death results.
Evaluating an event for its personal meaning is called?
primary appraisal
When the person focuses on coping strategies is called?
secondary appraisal
the person's effort to manage psychological stress.
coping
the purpose of which to regulate emotional distress and thus give aa person protection from anxiety and stress. It offers psychological protection from a stressful event.
ego-defense mechanism
a level of crisis that includes marriage, birth of a child, or retirement and requires new coping styles.
developmental crisis
a leve of crisis that can be provoked by an expernal source such as a job change, a motor vehicle crash, or death or severe illness.
situational crisis
the result of chronic stress.
burnout