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70 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
sentence that makes a statement and tells about a person, place, thing, or idea; Tory is my daughter
Declarative sentence
sentence that asks a question; is that my son Jimmy?
Interrogative sentence
sentence that issues a command; Please clear the dinner table
Imperative sentence
sentence that communicates strong ideas or feelings; that was a great shot!
Exclamatory sentence
sentence that expresses wishes or conditions contrary to fact; if you were to hang onto the basketball rim, then you could experience the glory of every NBA player
Conditional sentence
sentence with a single subject or compound subject and a single predicate or a compound predicate; this has only one independent and no dependent clauses
Simple sentence
type of simple sentence; my dog growls
Single subject, single predicate
type of simple sentence; My dog and my cat growl
Compound subject, single predicate
type of simple sentence; My dog and my cat growl and appear agitated
Compound subject, compound predicate
type of simple sentence; I must have two vicious pets from the pound in my town
Independent clause with two phrases
sentence made up of two independent clauses; clauses must be joined by a semicolon or by a comma and a coordinating conjunction; my dog growls at the maiman, but my cat growls at her littermate
Compound sentence
sentence with one independt clause and one or more dependent clauses; when you pass the Praxis II test, you'll enjoy a career in teaching
Complex sentence
sentence that has two or more independent clauses and one or more dependent clauses; I just earned my teaching degree, and I plan to get a teaching job because I need a career
Compound/complex sentence
sentence that is clear and concise, employs imagery, precise language, and rhythm
Effective sentence
sentence containing one of the following problems:
unnatural language, such as cliches or jargon
nonstandard language or unparallel construction
errors such as pronoun referent problems
short, stilted sentences; run-on sentences; or sentence fragments
Ineffective sentence
nouns that do not name specific people, places, or things and are not capitalized; person, animal, car
Common nouns
nouns that name particular people, places, or things and are capitalized; President Bush, Chicago, Judaism
Proper nouns
nouns that name a thing that is tangible (can be seen, heard, touched, smelled, or tasted); dog, Campus Cinema, football
Conrete nouns
nouns that name an idea, condition, or feeling (something that is not concrete); ideals, justice, Americana
Abstract nouns
nouns that name a group or unit; gaggle, herd, community
Collective nouns
number of nouns such as book, library, bacterium, man
Singular nouns
number of nouns such as books, libraries, children, bacteria, men
Plural nouns
gender of nouns such as father, brother, uncle, men, bull
Masculine nouns
gender of nouns such as mother, sister, aunt, women, cow
Feminine nouns
gender of nouns such as window, shrub, door, college, car
Neuter nouns
gender of nouns such as chairperson, politician, president, professor, flight attendant
Indefinite nouns
case of noun that can be the subject of a clause or the predicate noun when it follows the verb be
Nominative case noun
case of noun that shows possession or ownership
Possessive case noun
case of noun that can be a direct object, an indirect object, or an object of a preposition
Objective case noun
type of verb that takes direct objects - words or word groups that complete the meaning of a verb by naming a receiver of the action; The secondary English student learns the methods of the master teacher
Transitive verb
type of verb that takes no objects or complements; an airplane flew overhead
Intrasitive verb
type of verb that connects the subject and the subject complement (an adjective, noun, or noun equivalent); it was rainy
Linking or connecting verb
type of verb that comes before another verb; she must have passed the Praxis II exam
Auxiliary or helping verb
tense of verb used to describe situations tht exist in the present time; Celia and Tory attend Curtis Corner Middle School
Present tense verb
tense of verb used to tell about what happened in the past; they attended Wakefield Elementary School
Past tense verb
tense of verb used to express action that will take place in the future; next year, they will attend Broad Rock High School
Future tense verb
tense of verb used when action began in the past but continues into the present; Annie has attended a charter school for two years
Present perfect tense verb
tense of verb used to express action that began in the past and happened prior to aother past action; Dr. Hicks reported that redistricting had alleviated the crowding problem in schools
Past perfect tense verb
tense of verb used to express action that will begin in the future and wil be completed in the future; by this time next year, Tory and Celia will have graduated eighth grade
Future perfect tense verb
phrase usually made up of to and the base form of a verb, such as to order or to abandon; can function as an adjective, adverb, or noun
Infinitive phrase
verb form that usually ends in -ing or -ed and operates as adjectives but also maintain some characteristics of verbs; barking dog, painted faces
Participle
phrase made up of a present participle and functioning as a noun; Gardening is my favorite leisure activity
Gerund phrase
type of pronoun such as I, you, he, she, it, we, they, who, what
Simple pronoun
type of pronoun such as itself, myself, anybody, someone, everything
Compound pronoun
type of pronoun such as each other, one another
Phrasal pronoun
the noun to which a pronoun refers; Jimmy is playing in a basketball tournament tomorrow. He hopes to play well
Antecedent
class of pronoun that takes the place of nouns; Coach Spence change his starting line-up and won the game
Personal pronoun
class of pronoun that relates adjective clauses to the nouns or pronouns they modify; a basketball player who plays with intensity and skill gets a place in the starting line-up
Relative pronoun
class of pronoun that usually refers to unnamed or unknown people or things; perhaps you know somebody who can slam-dunk a basketball
Indefinite pronoun
class of pronoun that asks a question; who are you and why do you play basketball?
Interrogative pronoun
class of pronoun that points out people, places, or things without naming them; this should be an easy win, they are undefeated
Demonstrative pronoun
words, clauses, or phrases that limit or describe other words or groups of words
Modifiers
type of modifier that describes nouns or pronouns; big, blue, old, tacky, shiny, an
Adjective
type of modifier that describes time, place, manner, or degree
Adverb
tomorrow, monthly, momentarily, presently
Time adverb
there, yonder, here, backward
Place adverb
exactly, efficiently, clearly, steadfastly
Manner adverb
greatly, partly, too, incrementally
Degree adverb
groups of related words that operate as a single part of speech, such as a verb, verbal, prepositional, appositive, or absolute; "in the doghouse"
Phrases
groups of related words that have both a subject and a predicate; "(I have a tendency to procrastinate) when I have a high-stakes assignment"
Clauses
type of punctuation used between two independent clauses, to separate adjectives, to separate contrasted elements, to set off appositives, to separate items in a list, to enclose explanatory words, after an introductory phrase, after an introductory clause, to set off a nonrestrictive phrase, to ensure clarity, in numbers, to enclose titles, in a direct address, to set off dialogue, to set off items in an address, and to set of dates
Comma
type of punctuation used at the end of a sentence, after an initial or abbreviation, or as a decimal point
Period
type of punctuation used at the end of a direct or indirect question and to show uncertainty
Question mark
type of punctuation used to separate groups that include commas and to set of independent clauses
Semicolon
type of punctuation used to express strong feeling
Exclamation point
type of punctuation used in contractions, to form plurals, to form singluar possessives, to form plural possessives, in compound nouns, to show shared possession, and to express time or amount
Apostrophe
type of punctuation used for emphasis, to set of interrupted speech, to set off an introductory series, and to indicate a sudden break
Dash
type of punctuation used to set off explanatory information and to set off full sentences
Parentheses
type of punctuation used to set of added words, editorial corrections, and clarifying information
Brackets
type of punctuation used between nubers, between fractions, in a special series, to create new words, and to join numbers
Hyphen