Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/29

Click to flip

29 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
altruism
Altruism is selfless concern for the welfare of others. It is a traditional virtue in many cultures, and central to many religious traditions
antebellum
Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war (ante means before and bellum is war). In United States history and historiography, the term antebellum is often used to refer to the period of increasing sectionalism leading to the American Civil War, instead of the term "pre-Civil War".
Articles of Confederation
The first document created to govern the newly formed government after the American Revolution. It created a “firm league of friendship” among the 13 original states. The states agreed to send delegates to a Confederation Congress. Each state had one vote in Congress.
Bill of Rights
first ten amendments to the Constitution ratified in 1791, these amendments limit governmental power and protect basic rights and liberties of individuals.
Columbian Exchange
Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before war (ante means before and bellum is war). In United States history and historiography, the term antebellum is often used to refer to the period of increasing sectionalism leading to the American Civil War, instead of the term "pre-Civil War".
Commerce
Commerce is the trading of something of economic value such as goods, services, information or money between two or more entities
Common Sense
Common Sense was a pamphlet written by Thomas Paine. It was first published anonymously on January 10, 1776, before the American Revolution
confederation
A confederation is an association of sovereign states or communities, usually created by treaty but often later adopting a common constitution
Constitution of the United States
Constitution – the system of fundamental laws and principles that prescribes the nature, functions, and limits of a government or another institution. The fundamental law of the United States, framed in 1787, ratified in 1789, and variously amended since then.
Credit and debt
In finance, credit (as in the term "credit card") is the granting of a loan and the creation of debt. Debt is that which is owed; usually referencing assets owed, but the term can cover other obligations
Declaration of Independence
the declaration of the Congress of the Thirteen United States of America, on the 4th of July, 1776, by which they formally declared that these colonies were free and independent States, not subject to the government of Great Britain.
diplomacy
Diplomacy is the art and practice of conducting negotiations between representatives of groups or states
doctrine
A principle or body of principles presented for acceptance or belief, as by a religious, political, scientific, or philosophic group; dogma, e.g., Monroe Doctrine
Emancipation Proclamation
The Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order in 1863 by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War, which declared the freedom of all slaves in those areas of the rebellious Confederate States of America that had not already returned to Union control
federalism
power is shared between two sets of governmental institutions, those of the states and those of the central or federal authorities, as stipulated by the Constitution
Gettysburg Address
The Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order in 1863 by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War, which declared the freedom of all slaves in those areas of the rebellious Confederate States of America that had not already returned to Union control
infrastructure
Infrastructure is generally a set of interconnected structural elements that provide the framework supporting an entire structure. The term has diverse meanings in different fields, but is perhaps most widely understood to refer to roads, airports, and utilities.
institution
customs, practices, relationships, or behavioral patterns of importance in the life of a community or society: the institutions of marriage and the family. Established organizations or foundations that reflect the culture and beliefs of a people
insurrection
An insurgency, or insurrection, is an armed uprising, or revolt against an established civil or political authority.
interdependence
people relying on each other in different places or in the same place for ideas, goods, and services.
movement
the moving of people, ideas, information and products around the world.
nationalism
The belief that nations will benefit from acting independently rather than collectively, emphasizing national rather than international goals.
Puritanism
a religious reform movement in the late 16th and 17th centuries that sought to “purify” the Church of England of remnants of the Roman Catholic “popery” that the Puritans claimed had been retained after the religious settlement reached early in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.
Reconstruction
period after the Civil War when the south was re-built; also, the Federal program to rebuild it.
Republicanism
Republicanism is the ideology of governing a nation as a republic, with an emphasis on liberty, rule by the people, and the civic virtue practiced by citizens. Republicanism always stands in opposition to aristocracy, oligarchy and dictatorship. More broadly, it refers to a political system that protects liberty, especially by incorporating a rule of law that cannot be arbitrarily ignored by the government.
segregation
The policy or practice of separating people of different races, classes, or ethnic groups, as in schools, housing, and public or commercial facilities, especially as a form of discrimination
Social norms
In sociology, a norm, or social norm, is a rule that is socially enforced
suffrage
Suffrage (from the Latin suffragium, meaning "vote") is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right.
Supply and demand
the quantities of a good or service that a firm is willing and able to make available for sale at different prices (economic concept of supply and demand).