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32 Cards in this Set

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Does it matter if an accusation of sexual impurity is true?
No, regardless it is a mark on your reputation.
Harmodius and Aristogiton
Athenian lovers, insulted by Hipparchus, brother of Athenian tyrant Hippias; in revenge they kill Hipparchus and are executed.
Lucius Junius Brutus
nephew of Tarquin the Proud, avenger of Lucretia, one of first two consuls of Rome; name means "blockhead", pretends to be dumb, goes to Oracle, first to kiss mother (earth), founds new Rome
Lucretia
wife of Lucius Tarquinius Collatinus, raped by Sextus Tarquinius (king's son), is found spinning dutifully, kills self to save honor despite protestation from father, husband and Brutus (body is taken to middle of city, Brutus speaks, revolt follows)
Tullia
kills husband and takes his brother as a husband (like Clytmenestra)
Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus
Roman general, twice consul, conqueror of Carthaginian (evil people) general Hannibal, is given a woman as a prize and gives her back to her lover (shows him as sexually pure)
Verginia
freeborn daughter of the Centurion Verginius, falsely claimed as a slave by the magistrate Appius Claudius because she refuses to sleep with him; father kills her rather than have her be Claudius' sex slave (saves her honor)
Claudia Quinta
Roman matron who proves her chastity by miraculously rescuing the statue of Magna Mater from the Tiber (boat gets stuck)
753 BCE
traditional date of the founding of Rome
Olympian games
Olympia near Pisa, in honor of Zeus, every 4 years (quadrennial), 776 BCE, most important, prize is a wild olive planted by Heracles himself
Panhellenic games
open to all greek speaking people
Pythian games
at Delphi, in honor of Apollo, 582 BCE, quadrennial, started as a singing competition but moved into athletics, prize is a crown of laurel leaves
Nemean games
at Nemea, in honor of Zeus, associated with Heracles, biennial (not as prestigious), 573 BCE, win crown of fresh celery
Isthmian games
at Isthmia near Corinth, in honor of Poseidon, biennial, 582 BCE, win crown of dry celery
Myth for Olympic games
Chariot race of Pelops (unsporting story) OR Heracles' victory over Augeas (commemorates vengence against Augeas and explains how trees came to the site)
Myth for Nemean games
Burial of baby Opheltes by Seven against Thebes OR Heracles' victory over lion
Myth for Isthmian games
Burial of baby Melicertes by Sisyphus AND/OR Theseus' victory over robbers
priamel
a literary device which focuses attention by presenting a list of items to compare, culminating with the item of interest
triadic structure
verse structure for choral song consisting of matched stanzas (strophe and antistrophe) followed by a concluding stanza (epode)
Myth for Olympic games
Chariot race of Pelops (unsporting story) OR Heracles' victory over Augeas (commemorates vengence against Augeas and explains how trees came to the site)
Myth for Nemean games
Burial of baby Opheltes by Seven against Thebes OR Heracles' victory over lion
Myth for Isthmian games
Burial of baby Melicertes by Sisyphus AND/OR Theseus' victory over robbers
priamel
a literary device which focuses attention by presenting a list of items to compare, culminating with the item of interest
triadic structure
verse structure for choral song consisting of matched stanzas (strophe and antistrophe) followed by a concluding stanza (epode)
gnome, gnomic statement
truism expressed in third person e.g. 'a man who hopes to hide his doings from the gods is deluded'
Pythian games started because of...
the defeat of the Kyrians
standards of ancient games
events not timed, not allowed to kill opponents, usually performed nude
the most prestigious games were...
the most expensive (four horse chariot race because its expensive to own a chariot and train horses)
list 3 games
four horse chariot race, 2 horse chariot race, mule chariot race, horse race, yearling races, pankration, pankration for boys, boxing, wrestling, track and field events
Pindar
Theban poet, wrote Olympian 1: for Hieron, tyrant of Syracuse, victor of horse race of 476 BCE
Pindaric poems
consist of 3-6 triads (breaks up monotony of the poem, but is still cohesive because they mirror eachother), comissioned poems written by the victors of the games, sung by a chorus, sometimes dance, mythic or moralizing theme, opens with priamel-focusing-narrows down to specific victor (talks about the place, event, previous victors, native city, the gods, and sometimes the poet praises himself)
pankration
combination boxing/wrestling, no holds barred; anything goes except biting, gouging eyes, and killing opponent