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28 Cards in this Set

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acrimony

(ak'-ri-moe'-nee)
(n.) bitterness, discord

Though they vowed that no girl would ever come between them, Biff and Trevor could not keep -acrimony- from overwhelming their friendship after they both fell in love with the lovely Teresa.
acumen

(ak'-you-min)
(n.) keen insight


Because of his mathematical -acumen-, Larry was able to figure out in minutes problems that took other students hours.
alacrity

(a-lack'-ri-tee)
(n.) eagerness, speed


For some reason, Chuck loved to help his mother whenever he could, so when his mother asked him to set the table, he did so with -alacrity-.
anathema

(a-na'tha-ma)
(n.) a cursed, detested person



I never want to see that murderer. He is an -anathema- to me.
antipathy

(an-tip'a-thE)
(n.) a strong dislike, repugnance


I know you love me, but because you are a liar and a thief, I feel nothing but
-antipathy- toward you.
approbation

(ap'ro-bay'-shun)
(n.) praise



The crowd welcomed the heroes with
-approbation-.
harangue


(ha-rang')
(n.; v.) - a loud, noisy, or scolding speech; a tirade

If the coach let out with fewer depressing -harangues- and more motivational speeches, maybe the kids would play better.
aspersion

(a-spur'-zhun; -shun)
(n.) an unfavorable, damaging, defamatory, or slanderous remark



The rival politicians repeatedly cast
-aspersions- on each others’ integrity.
effrontery

(i-fron'-tery)
(n.) impudence, nerve, insolence


When I told my aunt that she was boring, my mother scolded me for my
-effrontery-.
boon
(n.) a gift or blessing



The good weather has been a -boon- for many businesses located near the beach.
buffet


1. verb (buff'-it)

2. nown (ba-fay'; byU'-fay)
1. (v.) to strike with force (The strong winds -buffeted- the ships, threatening to capsize them.)
2. (n.) an arrangement of food set out on a table (Rather than sitting around a table, the guests took food from our
-buffet- and ate standing up.)
iconoclast


(eye-con'-oh-clast)
(n.) one who attacks common beliefs or institutions

She's more of a casual -iconoclast- than a true activist with a progressive agenda.
buttress

(but' ris)
1. (v.) to support, hold up
(The column -buttresses- the roof above the statue.)

2. (n.) something that offers support (The -buttress- supports the roof above the statues.)
cacophony

(ka-kof'a-nee)
(n.) a distinctly disharmonious set of sounds; a discordant noise

The elementary school orchestra created a such -cacophony- at the recital that even some of the parents had to hold their ears.
calumny

(kaal'um-nee)
(n.) an attempt to spoil someone else’s reputation by spreading lies

The incumbent's -calumny- ruined his opponent’s chances of winning the election.
clemency

(clem'-en-see)
(n.) show of mercy, a lienient act, mildness of weather


After he forgot their anniversary, Martin could only beg Maria for
-clemency-.
conflagration

(kon'fla-gray'-shun)
(n.) a great destructive fire



The -conflagration- consumed the entire building.
conundrum

(ka-nun'-drum)
(n.) a puzzlingly difficult, often paradoxical problem


Interpreting Jane’s behavior was a constant -conundrum- to everyone.
credulity

(kri-dool'a-tee; -dyU'- )
(n.) a tendency to believe too readily



His -credulity- made him an easy target for con men.
cupidity

(kyU-pid'ity)

rhymes with "stupidity"
(n.) greed, excessive desire


His -cupidity- made him enter the abandoned gold mine despite the obvious dangers.
parvenu

(par'-ve-new)
(n.) an upstart; A person who has suddenly risen to a higher social and economic class and has not yet gained social acceptance by that class.

Though obviously smart, he was seen as a meer -parvenu- and none the social elete would listen.
diatribe

(di'a-tribe)
(n.) a lenthy, bitter/abusive criticism


She finally stopped trying to learn because every simple mistake would evoke a painful -diatribe- as to her uselessness.
machination (relates to Machiavelli)

(mack-i-nay'-shun; ma'ki-nay'-shun)
(n.) 1-The act of plotting; 2 -
A crafty scheme or cunning design for the accomplishment of a sinister end.

He was plotting his evil schemes again, one -machination- after another.
discourse


(dis-course')
(n.) - a conversation or speech, typically lengthy


If we had had for a -discourse- on every aspect of the plan, it probably would not have failed at the end.
convocation


(con'va-kay'-shun)
(n.) a group, especially an academic assembly; a group of eagles

Usually the year is started off with a solemn, but predictable, -convocation- extoling the virtues of our school and its graduates.
dreck

(rhymes with "wreck")
(n.) trash/junk, especially inferior merchandise


We give you enough allowance that your room needn't be fill with the -dreck- from every junk store in the mall.
effrontery

(eh-frunt'-er-ee)
(n.) brazen boldness; presumptuousness


When I told my aunt that she was boring, my mom scolded me for my -effrontery-.
iniquity

(i-nick'-qui-ty)
(n.) wickedness or sin/sinfullness

"Your -iniquity-," said the priest, "will be forgiven, if you are truly sorry for your sinful actions."