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43 Cards in this Set

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The basic purpose for an interview is to impart or obtain information or

a. improve operational techniques.
b. develop employee-supervisor relations.
c. further the goals of the organizations.
d. influence behavior or attitudes.
d. influence behavior or attitudes.
During an interview it is sometimes difficult to reconcile individual differences with the organization's goals, basically because

a. organizational goals are seldom known.
b. conflicts of interest are always resolved in favor of the individual.
c. an adequate appreciation for these goals has not been instilled in the interviewees.
d. at the level of the interview, group goals are remote and repressive.
c. an adequate appreciation for these goals has not been instilled in the interviewees.
Skillful supervisors lean about their employees by analyzing their work through inspection, by talking with them and

a. studying their reports.
b. hearing about them.
c. researching thier past.
d. watching them work.
b. hearing about them.
The degree of success a supervisor has in learning about his men by talking with them is directly related to

a. how well he is accepted.
b. his ability to interview effectively.
c. his rank and postion.
d. the effort he puts forth.
d. the effort he puts forth.
The technique a supervisor uses to interview a subordinate should

a. be consistent, with the emphasis on motivation.
b. be geared to learn about the individual.
c. develop a change in attitude and responsibilities.
d. vary, depending on the objective to be accomplished.
d. vary, depending on the objective to be accomplished.
An important difference between an interrogation and interview is

a. the exchange of information is mostly unilateral in an interrogation.
b. interrogations usually do not have a dominant actor.
c. information exchanged is relatively uniform in both processes.
d. an interrogation does not involve supervisory personnel.
a. the exchange of information is mostly unilateral in an interrogation.
As a guide to cover salient points during an interview, a supervisor would find it useful to have

a. a stenographer present.
b. another supervisor present.
c. a written outline.
d. a personal history of the interviewee.
c. a written outline.
Private interviews help avoid

a. the giving of false information.
b. deviating from a specific course.
c. authoritative-type discussions.
d. possible interviewee inhibition.
d. possible interviewee inhibition.
When beginning an interview, if the interviewer's initial conversation related to a matter of interest to the interviewee, it will usually

a. bring about a calm and relaxed atmosphere.
b. stimulate responses from him.
c. reduce hostility and provide a more accurate response.
d. bring focus to the real area of concern.
b. stimulate responses from him.
The attitude of an interviewer should most nearly be

a. domineering.
b. paternalistic.
c. overly authoritative.
d. none of the above.
d. none of the above.
The central figure of each interview should be the

a. interviewer
b. interviewee
c. subject matter
d. need for improvement
b. interviewee
Learning occurs to a greater degree when a supervisor

a. speaks.
b. writes.
c. listens.
d. reprimands.
c. listens.
One reasons supervisors at times are not good listeners to what others are saying is they are

a. preoccupied with the subordinates problem.
b. taken back by a hostile attitude.
c. more used to speaking and giving orders.
d. often encouraging the subordinate to talk.
c. more used to speaking and giving orders.
During an interview with a subordinate, he remarks, "Supervisors don't seem to take the interest in their men they once did." A good reply by the supervisor would be

a. "as they once did?"
b. "yes we do."
c. "can you substantiate that?"
d. "you're probably right."
a. "as they once did?"
During an interview with a subordinate, he remarks, "No matter how hard I work around here, I never seem to get any credit for it." A good reply by the supervisor would be

a. "you get the credit you deserve."
b. "you never seem to get any credit?"
c. "you get as much credit as anyone else."
d. "credit is given when it is due."
b. "you never seem to get any credit?"
A subordinated advises his supervisor he would like to tell him something, but only on the condition it be kept strictly confidential. After the supervisor agrees and hears the information, he realized it is vital to the department. Under the circumstances he should

a. apologize for making an agreement and reveal the information.
b. try to get the subordinate to reveal the information on his own volition.
c. send an anonymous letter to the department head revealing the information.
d. accept the agreement he made and keep the information to himself.
b. try to get the subordinate to reveal the information on his own volition.
A supervisor is confronted by one of his men with a personal problem and he would like the supervisor to help. After hearing the problem, the supervisor realizes the soulution is rather obvious, at least to him. Under the circumstances he would

a. assist him in finding the solution, rather than telling him.
b. tell him the solution and how he arrived at it.
c. ask the subordinate if he has any solution prior to making a comment.
d. not become involved in personal problems of subordinates.
a. assist him in finding the solution, rather than telling him.
Hearing an employee's problem you realize it has resulted from a lack of information. A supervisor may best overcome this by furnishing him with

a. sound, logical advice.
b. facts as they become available.
c. the desired information.
d. the cause for problems.
c. the desired information.
During an interview the emotions that are most transferred from one person to another are

a. shyness or reticence.
b. anger or hostility.
c. talkativeness or silence.
d. lying or exaggeration.
b. anger or hostility.
The most common interviews between supervisors and subordinates are of

a. a formal nature.
b. a disciplinary nature.
c. an informal nature.
d. an evaluative nature.
c. an informal nature.
An acceptable place for informal interviews between supervisors and subordinates is where

a. lunch is eaten
b. briefing sessions are held.
c. where coffee breaks take place.
d. all of the above.
d. all of the above.
A supervisor should be careful when conducting an interview with a subordinate that he doesn't make subtle comments or innuendos about superiors or subordinate personnel because

a. the subordinate may not make his true feelings known.
b. future dealings with the supervisor mentioned may be seriously affected.
c. he may be misinterpreted, misquoted, or misunderstood.
d. the real purpose of the meeting will seldom be realized.
c. he may be misinterpreted, misquoted, or misunderstood.
During the course of an interview with a subordinate care should be used in what is said and also in how it is said. It would be well for a supervisor to proceed on the assumption that his comments are

a. often not heard or understood to any degree.
b. subject to having hidden meanings read into them.
c. likely to reveal some of his shortcomings or weaknesses.
d. an outlet for his frustrations and anger.
b. subject to having hidden meanings read into them.
During an interview a supervisor should avoid the appearance he is

a. prying.
b. the boss.
c. decisive.
d. all of the above.
a. prying.
The primary objective of an employment interview is

a. to put an applicant at ease and judge his ability.
b. a means of obtaining clues for use in determining character.
c. an appraisal of the job seeker's qualifications.
d. to hire or fire an individual.
c. an appraisal of the job seeker's qualifications.
Beliefs, opinions, and attitudes revealed during an interview might best be described as

a. confidential information.
b. revealing integrity.
c. secondary in importance.
d. subjective information.
d. subjective information.
A supervisor or interviewer will generally find it easiest to rate an individual's

a. fear.
b. poise.
c. temperament.
d. courage.
b. poise.
In rating individuals there is a term referred to as the "halo effect" and it most accuately means

a. rating a person as the rater would like to be rated.
b. making a judgement based on one's ability to speak well.
c. rating a person based on one favorable attribute.
d. using education and religion as the basis for a rating.
c. rating a person based on one favorable attribute.
Well planned personal history forms used in hiring police personnel are excellent for obtaining information regarding

a. the candidate's background.
b. his true personality.
c. defects in temperament.
d. job positions available.
a. the candidate's background.
Job interviews should be conducted in an atmosphere that is

a. business like
b. cordial and informal.
c. constructive and humane.
d. objective and formal.
b. cordial and informal.
Once authority states the function of the employment interview is to

a. make an evalution more on qualities that are not apparent.
b. get the organization's side of the story across.
c. develop rapport, serve an interest, and hire an employee.
d. get information, give information and make a friend.
a. make an evaluation more on qualities that are not apparent.
Progress interviews between supervisor and subordinate have as a major objective

a. the reviewing of past and future performance.
b. to aid the subordinate to engage in self appraisal.
c. a review of the subordinate's work ability and his relationships with his peers.
d. just letting the subordinate know his supervisor is interested in him.
b. to aid the subordinate to engage in self appraisal.
The progress-type interview should

a. deal only with specific issues.
b. conform to certain specifications.
c. vary with the individual.
d. ultimately be reduced to writing.
c. vary with the individual.
When a supervisor is discussing a subordinate's performance, he should avoid

a. stressing his strong or weak points.
b. being specific in his constructive advice.
c. vague, general comments.
d. encouraging the subordinate to answer his own problems when possible.
c. vague, general comments.
The level of an individual's performance is largely dependent on

a. an understanding supervisor.
b. his personal development.
c. public support.
d. his attitude.
d. his attitude.
During a progress interview with a subordinate, his supervisor should avoid comparing him with other subordinates, primarily because

a. it will create bitterness and personal animosity.
b. the other subordinates may have undesirable traits.
c. his development will not exceed the aggregate average.
d. initiative and resourcefulness will be curtailed.
a. it will create bitterness and personal animosity.
A progress interview between supervisor and subordinate must improve

a. the quantity and quality of work.
b. result in equal satisfaction between both parties.
c. result in satisfaction or constructive guidance for the subordinate.
d. determine motives, reduce friction, and improve morale.

a.
c. result in satisfaction or constructive guidance for the subordinate.
During a conversation with a subordinate you realize the resentment he feels over an incident has no basis whatsoever. you should

a. allow him to speak his mind and generally agree with him.
b. realize the grievance is very real to him.
c. point out how foolish his resentment is and ask him to analyze the incident sensibly.
d. check the employee's record to determine if he is a chronic complainer.
b. realize the grievance is very real to him.
A disciplinary action interview will

a. be done in two settings: the investigation and conveying its results to the employee
b. best be done after a "cooling off" period.
c. be done in an objective manner.
d. all the above.
d. all the above.
Interviewing of police who are separating from the department is especially helpful in determining.

a. how the felt the department functioned.
b. if the supervision was good, fair, or poor.
c. useful or harmful hiring process.
d. what contribution they made to the department.
c. useful or harmful hiring process.
When conducting a separation interview with an employee, it is most important

a. that the employee not leave feeling the department is a poor place to work.
b. that dereliction and/or incompetency be pointed out as a reason for his separations.
c. that every effort be made to keep this employee as part of the department.
d. that the cause of his leaving is examined and corrected.
a. that the employee not leave feeling the department is a poor place to work.
In learning how to become a good interviewer, it is necessary to

a. watch the experts.
b. analyze the interviewee
c. experience and practice.
d. know and understand yourself.
c. experience and practice.
Interviews should be conducted with police who are leaving the department if the reason is

a. voluntary resignation
b. retirement.
c. termination for cause.
d. all of the above.
d. all of the above.