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30 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
social group
a collection of people who interact with each other and have certain feelings of unity (sorority)
social aggregate
just a number of people who happen to be in one place but do not interact with each other (line at a store)
social category
a number of people who have something in common but who neither interact with one another nor gather in one place (men)
in-group
the group to which an individual is strongly tied as a member (Pi Beta Phi)
out-group
the group of which an individual is not a member (Gamma Phi Beta)
Three characteristics of a cohesive in-group
1. use of symbols such as names, slogans, dress, or badges to identify themselves so that they will be distinguishable from the out-group
2. view themselves in terms of positive stereotypes and the out-group in terms of negative stereotypes
3. inclined to compete or clash with the out-group
reference group
a group that is used as the frame of reference for evaluating one's own behavior (an in-group can become a reference group)
primary group
individuals interact informally, relate to each other as whole persons, and enjoy their relationship for its own sake (sorority, family, etc)
secondary group
individuals don't know each other personally and may have little face-to-face interaction. If they interact they do so formally and relate to each other only in terms of particular roles for certain practical purposes. (Salesclerks and customers)
Three types of leaders
1. Instrumental leaders
2. Expressive leaders
3. Laissez-faire leaders
instrumental leaders
those who achieve their groups goal by getting others to focus on task performance. (Also known as autocratic leaders.) "Let's get to work! We're getting off-track!" This kind of leadership can get the group to move toward a goal but it often rubs people the wrong way. (stereotypical CEO)Most people tend to not like them. Most effective.
expressive leaders
achieve group harmony by making others feel good. (Also known as democratic leaders.) More concerned with members' feelings, making sure everyone is happy, so that cohesiveness can reign in the group. Partnership between leader and followers (People's Organization) More effective.
laissez-faire leader
lets others work more or less on their own; it is widely assumed that people, especially those with much education or special skill, will perform well if left relatively alone with a minimum of direction, instruction, or supervision from below. However, this means little or no social support. Least effective.
idiosyncrasy credit
the privilege that allows leaders to leaders to deviate from their groups' norms or, by extension, society's norms. (Bill Clinton's affair.)
Solomon Asch
conducted classic short line-long line experiment to study social pressure to conform
social group
a collection of people who interact with each other and have certain feelings of unity (sorority)
social aggregate
just a number of people who happen to be in one place but do not interact with each other (line at a store)
social category
a number of people who have something in common but who neither interact with one another nor gather in one place (men)
in-group
the group to which an individual is strongly tied as a member (Pi Beta Phi)
out-group
the group of which an individual is not a member (Gamma Phi Beta)
Three characteristics of a cohesive in-group
1. use of symbols such as names, slogans, dress, or badges to identify themselves so that they will be distinguishable from the out-group
2. view themselves in terms of positive stereotypes and the out-group in terms of negative stereotypes
3. inclined to compete or clash with the out-group
reference group
a group that is used as the frame of reference for evaluating one's own behavior (an in-group can become a reference group)
primary group
individuals interact informally, relate to each other as whole persons, and enjoy their relationship for its own sake (sorority, family, etc)
secondary group
individuals don't know each other personally and may have little face-to-face interaction. If they interact they do so formally and relate to each other only in terms of particular roles for certain practical purposes. (Salesclerks and customers)
Three types of leaders
1. Instrumental leaders
2. Expressive leaders
3. Laissez-faire leaders
instrumental leaders
those who achieve their groups goal by getting others to focus on task performance. (Also known as autocratic leaders.) "Let's get to work! We're getting off-track!" This kind of leadership can get the group to move toward a goal but it often rubs people the wrong way. (stereotypical CEO)Most people tend to not like them. Most effective.
expressive leaders
achieve group harmony by making others feel good. (Also known as democratic leaders.) More concerned with members' feelings, making sure everyone is happy, so that cohesiveness can reign in the group. Partnership between leader and followers (People's Organization) More effective.
laissez-faire leader
lets others work more or less on their own; it is widely assumed that people, especially those with much education or special skill, will perform well if left relatively alone with a minimum of direction, instruction, or supervision from below. However, this means little or no social support. Least effective.
idiosyncrasy credit
the privilege that allows leaders to leaders to deviate from their groups' norms or, by extension, society's norms. (Bill Clinton's affair.)
Solomon Asch
conducted classic short line-long line experiment to study social pressure to conform. Nearly 1/3 changed their answer even though they knew that they were right and the group was wrong.