Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/62

Click to flip

62 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What are contributing factors to respiratory infections in children?
-Put everything in mouth.
-Possible lower resistance during antibody building
-Eustation tube horizontal
-Tonsils larger
-Airway Narrow/Trach Short
-2nd Hand Smoke
What are the main principles for caring for any child with a respiratory infection?
Keeping Airway patent and keeping child comfortable.
What is etiology of pharyngitits; what symptoms
Viral - RSV
Gradual Onset, Sore Throat Peak Day 2-3
Low Grade Fever
Horse, Cough, Rhinitis, Conjunctiva
Last 3-4 Days
Bacterial
Abrupt Onste, Sore Thoat Severe. Fever High 103-104
ABD, Vomit, Headache
3-5 Days Duration
What is therapeutic management; who gets antibiotics
Rest and Pain Relief. NaCL Gargle. Cool, Bland Liquids.

Children get ABX to prevent Rhumatic Fever and are not infectious after 24hours of ABX Tx.
For otitis media- what is the Pathophysiology, Etiology, and diagnosis; What Complications
Inmature anatomy of childs middle ear and eustachian tube.
Bacterial pathogen, daycare exposure, pacifer p six months, bottle feeding reflux.
Dx by hx of S/S or otoscopy puff of air in ear.
Hearing loss is large concern as can lead to delayed speach.
For croup syndromes- what is the patho, etiology and management.
Croup is viral infection infection of upper airway.
Sudden onset of harsh, metallic cough, inspiratory stridor and horseness. Respiratory Distress.
Caused by Parainfluenza Viruses.
Tx Goal is to maintain a patent airway.
What is bronchitis, etiology, presentation and management
Inflamation of trachea and major bronchi.
Viral in origin
Presents with rhinitis, NP Cough
Management is rest, humidification, increased fluid intake.
Asthma- what is the Definition, Etiology, risk factors, Pathophysiology, Symptoms and Triggers; how is it assessed with peak flow meter
Reversable Obstructive Airway Disease responsive to variety of stimuli causing bronchospasam, inflammation and edema.
Appears in families, males African American and Latino, crowded living areas, poverty and 2nd hand smoke.
Dry Cough, Wheezing, Dyspnea on exertion.
Less than 50% on PEFR is cause for hospitalization where treated with Resuce Meds
How is a MDI and nebulizer used
Metered Dose Inhailer allows medication to float in the changer so that push and coordination don't have to happen at same time.
Nebuliaers produce a fine mist or spray from a medication to promote inhaliation.
What is education on reducing triggers of Asthma.
Limit Polen and Dust
Limit Molds
Limit Dander
What is the goal for nursing interventions in Asthma
Avoid Allergens
Relieve Bronchospasm
Provide Acute Care-Rescue Meds via calm reassuring manner
Support Child and Family
What are common sign/symptoms of Asthma.
Cough, Hacking, Irritative and NP
Respiratory Distress - SOB, Wehhze, lips dark red, sweating
Chese - Hyperresonance, courase loud breath sounds
Prolonged Respirations
Barrel Chest, Elevated Shoulders
How is ped respiratory system different from adult system
|
|
|
|
|
|
How is it diagnosed and what potential complications with GABHS
|
|
|
|
|
|
What are the symptoms of tonsillitis; therapeutic management; what is post tonsillectomy care
|
|
|
|
|
|
What is post op care and discharge teaching for myringotomy with tubes
|
|
|
|
|
|
What are the cardinal signs for epiglottitis; clinical manifestations
|
|
|
|
|
|
What is bronchiolitis, etiology, presentation and management;
|
|
|
|
|
|
What is the most common causative organism of bronchiolitis and how is it prevented?
|
|
|
|
|
|
How is bronchiolitis diagnosed; what medications are commonly used; what meds are used as preventative and for whom?
|
|
|
|
|
|
How is asthma managed- what routine and rescue medications?
|
|
|
|
|
|
How is exacerbation managed
|
|
|
|
|
|
What is cystic fibrosis?
|
|
|
|
|
|
What is the pathophysiology of CF?
|
|
|
|
|
|
How is CF diagnosed?
|
|
|
|
|
|
What is the effect on the exocrine glands?
|
|
|
|
|
|
What is the chronic management for pulmonary and GI symptoms of CF?
|
|
|
|
|
|
What are the characteristics of fetal circulation and how does it change at birth.
The Fetus gets is blood from the placenta via the Inferior Vena Cava. Pressure changes at birth and cord clamping cause foramen ovale to close.
What are differences in the pediatric cardio system compared to an adult
|
|
|
|
|
|
How is cardiovascular functioning assessed; what is the purpose of cardiac catheterization; what is postop cath care
Cardiac Function can be assessed by Cardiac Catheterization which can be diagnostic, interventional (balloon) or Electrophysiology to study dysrythmias.

Post Op same as any surgery. Most important are:
-Pulses at Cath Site
-Temp and color of extremety
-VS q15. HR is full minute
What is endocarditis, possible complications and nursing management.
|
|
|
|
|
What is rheumatic heart disease; what is the etiology; what are the autoimmune responses?
|
|
|
|
|
What is Kawasaki disease; is there a causative organism; what are the symptoms; what is the biggest danger; what is the medical and nursing management; what is education for parents
An acute febrile disease of children, marked acutely by fever, rashes, lymphadenopathy, and irritability, and chronically by late cardiac complications, including coronary artery aneurysms and myocardial infarction.

Etiology remains a mystery and most serious danger is MI from stenosis.
-Medical Management is high dose IV gamma globulin.
-Nurse managment is to monitor VS especially cardiac status and delivery of blood product. Child will be very irratable and nursing interventions need to focus around these.
DC Teach avoid vaccines, hands and feet peel. Arthritis might be a problem.
What are the characteristics of anemia; what is iron deficiency anemia, symptoms, nursing education and problems if left untreated
|
|
|
|
|
What is sickle cell anemia; what are the RBC changes that occur, what symptoms; what is sickle cell crisis; how does the patient present, what medical and nursing management
|
|
|
|
|
What is the difference between cyanotic and acyanotic congenital heart disease; what are the hemodynamic characteristics;
|
|
|
|
|
Complete the congenital heart grid and try to visualize the altered blood flow patterns
|
|
|
|
|
What are the principles of care for congenital heart disease?
|
|
|
|
|
CHF is a complication of CHD- what is the patho and the patient symptoms; what is the medical management?
|
|
|
|
|
What are the signs and symptoms of hypoxemia?
|
|
|
|
|
What is postop care for congenital heart disease?
|
|
|
|
|
What are digoxin signs and symptoms of toxicity
|
|
|
|
|
What is medical and nursing management of Rhumatic Heart?
|
|
|
|
|
What are the pediatric differences in the respiratory system?
|
|
|
|
|
What are contributing factors to respiratory infections in children?
|
|
|
|
|
What immunizations are available for reducing respiratory tract illness?
|
|
|
|
|
How does Pediatric gastrointestinal system differ from adult system?
|
|
|
|
|
What are causes of diarrhea? What potential electrolyte imbalance?
|
|
|
|
|
What are causes of vomiting? What potential electrolyte imbalance?
|
|
|
|
|
How is genitourinary system different for pediatric patients?
|
|
|
|
|
What factors are predisposing to development of UTI?
|
|
|
|
Define Epiglottitis.
|
What is laryngeotracheobronchitis
|
List some signs of Epiglotitis
Age - Any
Onset - Sudden
Location - Superglotic
Temperature - High
Dysphagia - Severe
Dyspnea - Present
Drooling - Present
Cough - Uncommon
Position - Forward Mouth Open
Xray - + Thumb Sign
List some signs of Croup.
Age - 6 months to 6 years
Onset - Gradual
Location - Subglotic
Temperature - Low Grade
Dysphagia - Mild or Absent
Dyspnea - Present
Drooling - Present
Cough - Characteristic Cough
Position - Comfortable Different Positions
Xray - Positive Steeple Sign
steeple sign Narrowing of the column of subglottic air in the trachea, seen on anteroposterior radiographs of the neck in children with croup.
What are 4 Rescue Meds for Asthma?
Short Acting Bronchodilators
Anticholinergics
Mast Cell Inhibitors
Systemic Corticosteroids
What are three routine medications for Asthma?
Long Acting Bronchodilators
Inhaled corticoteroids
Leukotriene Blockers
What is a food sensitivity?
It can be an allergy, or an intollerance.
What differentiates a food allergy and an intollerance?
An allergy has an Immune response involved, ie IgE, while an intollerance is like a lactose intollerance R/T deficiency of an enzyme.
What is Atopy?
An allergy with a heriditary tendency. One parent with allergies give a child a 50% increase in having allergies. Both parents is a 100% increase chance.
What is sensitization?
The first time an allergin is encourntered the response will be slight or nonexistent. Once the body creates antibodies then repeated exposures cause a more pronounced response.
If an infant is allergic to cows milk, what other type of formula should be avoided?
Soy due to cross-reactivity.