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670 Cards in this Set

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ignominy
deep disgrace
venal (veen ul)
capable of being
bribed, esp. for money; corrupt

The man's interest in helping the sick
old woman was strictly venal; he only
wanted his
name on her will.
impugn (imp yoon)
to attack the truth of
or integrity of something

The critic impugned the originality
of Jacob's
novel.
desultory
without a plan or purpose; random

Phil made a few
desultory attempts
to start
a garden, but nothing
came of them.
avow
to claim, or to admit
temerity
boldness, recklessness, or audacity
insidious
treacherous; sneaky

Cancer, which can spread rapidly
from a
small cluster of cells,
is an insidious disease.
incantation
a chant; a repetitive statement like a chant
propitious
marked by favorable signs or conditions
putative
commonly accepted
(not proven),
supposed; reputed

The putative reason for placing the
monument downtown
is that nobody wanted it uptown.
doctrinaire
inflexibly committed to
a doctrine or theory
without proof that
it works; dogmatic
arbitrary
random; capricious
adulterate
to contaminate;
to make impure

Vegetarians do not like their foods
adulterated with
animal fats.
(unadulterated = pure)
acrid
harsh, like acid
manifest
visible, evident
abject
hopeless, sad;
defeated

An abject person is
one who is crushed
without hope.

"abject poverty" is
a redundant statement
patent (pay tunt)
obvious

To say the Earth
is flat is a patent absurdity;
the world is
obviously sphere.
impetuous
impulsive,
extremely impatient

Samantha was so
impetuous that she
never took more than
a few seconds to
make up her mind.
axiom
a self-evident truth,
an accepted
statement
congenital
innate
enormity
extreme evil;
hideous offense
malinger
to pretend sickness,
to avoid doing work
flout
to disregard something

A driver flouts the
traffic laws by driving through red lights.

"flaunt success"= to make
it known of ones success
plaintive
expressing sadness
or sorrow

The chilly autumn
made the bird's song
seem plaintive.
vitiate
to make impure,
to pollute

The flouride in
water can vitiate
your body.
peremptory (per uhmp tory)
final, categorical,
dictorial
protract
to prolong

The trial was so
protracted that one of
the jurors died of old age.
fatuous
foolish, silly, idiotic

Pauline is so pretty
that her suitors are
often driven to fatuous
acts of devotion.
inane
senseless, silly
dictum
authoritative saying;
proverb
precept
a rule to live by;
a principle establishing
a certain kind of
action; a maxim.

"Love thy neighbor"
is a precept.
abnegate
to reject, to
renounce; to deny
oneself things

Samantha abnegated
desserts for one
month after getting
on the scale.
comprise
to consist of

A company comprises employees.

"a company is comprised
of employees
= wrong!"
amenable
obedient; willing to
give in to the wishes
of others; agreeable

When I suggested that
Bert pay for my
lunch, he was
suprisingly amenable.
recant
to publicly take
back and deny; to
openly confess an error
desiccate
to dry out
consonant
harmonious, in agreement
malaise
feeling of
depression, uneasiness
grandiose
absurdly exhaggerated
querulous
complaining
obsequious
fawning, subservient
forgo
to do without;
to forbear
pejorative
negative, disparaging
endemic
native to, indigenous
polemic
a powerful argument
(often made to
attack or refute a controversial issue)

The book was a
convincing polemic that
exposed CEO's deceptions.
ascendency
supremacy, domination
venial (vee nial)
trivial or pardonable

A peccadillo is
a venial, harmless
sin.
exhort
to urge strongly, to seriously warn

The coach used
a bull horn to exhort
us to try harder.

(adjective: hortatory)
epigram
witty, satirical saying
proscribe
to outlaw, to prohibit
forebear
an ancestor
specious
deceptively plausible
or attractive

The rivers beauty turned
out to be specious; what
looked like churning
rapids was really foamy industrial waste.
callow
immature
turpitude
shameful wickedness;
depravity
adherent
follower, supporter
tenuous
flimsy, extremely thin

He has a tenuous financial
situation.

"extenuating circumstances"
lessen the magnitude

(v)attenuate= to make thin
noxious
harmful, offensive

Smoking is a noxious habit
in every sense.
postulate
something accepted as true
without proof; an axiom
rebuke
to criticize sharply
obtuse
insensitive, blockheaded
mortify
to humiliate
laconic
using few words; especially
in a rude way
chronic
constant, lasting a long
time
mandate
command, authorization
circumlocution
an indirect expression; use
wordy or evasive language
capitulate
to surrender, to give in

On the 20th day of
the strike,
the workers capitulated
& returned to work
w/out a new contract.
exasperate
to annoy thoroughly;
to make very angry;
to try the patience of
dogma
a belief
deluge
a flood, an inundation
rebut
to contradict; to argue
in opposition to; to prove
to be false
congenial
agreeably suitable, pleasant
degenerate
to break down; to
deteriorate
dissolution
the breaking up or
dissolving of something
into parts
exculpate
free from guilt
prolific
abundantly productive,
fruitful or fertile
succumb
to yield or submit; to die
consecrate
to make or declare sacred
construe
to interpret
homily
a sermon, an inspirational
saying
explicit
clearly and directly
expressed

implicit= indirectly expressed
indiscrete
not separated, jumbled
together
decorous
proper; in good taste,
orderly
coerce
to force someone to do
or not do something
cognizant
aware, conscious
complement
(v) to complete or fill up;
to be the perfect counterpart

The flowers complemented
the table decorations.
constitute
to make up, compose
comprehensive
covering or including
everything
agrarian
related to land
compose
to make up the contituent
parts of; to form

The exhibit was composed
of French paintings.
concord
harmony, agreement
unremitting
unceasing, unabating;
relentless
dialectical
relating to discussions,
relating to reasoning
patrician
aristrocrat, nobleman
reciprocal
mutual, shared

"reciprocity" = reciprocal
relation between 2 parties;
both parties win.
antipathy
firm dislike
bane
poison, torment, curse

"bane of my existence" is
used figuratively
catharsis
a purefication that brings
emotional relief
cadence
rhythm; the rise and fall
of sounds
ursine
bears
chagrin
humiliation
inclement
bad weather
affinity
sympathy, attraction

"he has an affinity towards that Porsche"
foible
a minor character flaw
infer
to conclude, to deduce
encroach
to make gradual or stealthy inroads into; to trespass
aphorism
a brief, witty saying; proverb
tantamount
equivalent to
provident
preparing for the future; frugal
vindicate
to clear from all blame; to justify
bourgeois
boringly conventional, middle class
covert
secret, hidden
circuitous
roundabout, not following a direct path
incisive
cutting right to the heart of the matter
infinitesimal
very small
intrinsic
inherent
circumscribe
to draw the line around, to set limits
kinetic
lively, active
legacy
something handed down, a bequest
broach
to open up a delicate subject
bucolic
rustic, countrylike
beleaguer
to surround
decimate
to kill or destroy a large part of
catalyst
it makes things happen
nepotism
favoritism to friends
or family in business
or politics
catholic
universal, embracing everything
clement
mild; mild weather
obscure
uknown, hard to understand
palpable
capable of
being touched;
obvious; touchable
or tangible
parochial
narrow point of view, provincial
partisan
one who supports
a particular person,
cause or idea
pathology
the study of diseases
elliptical
oval; missing words; obscure
tautological
redundant, circular
injunction
a command or court order
perfidy
treachery
sacrilege
a violation or something sacred;
blasphemy
(n. sacrilegious =
to commit sacrilege)
derogatory
disapproving; degrading
impervious
not allowing anything to pass through
concurrent
happening at the same time, parallel
covenant
a solemn agreement, a pledge
disinterested
not taking sides, unbiased
sardonic
mocking, scornful
vicissitude
upheaval, natural change, change in fortune
covet
to wish for enviously
prepossess
to preoccupy, to influence beforehand;
to make a good
impression beforehand
latent
present but not visible; potential
approbation
approval
deprecate
to express disapproval of
refute
to prove to be false; to disprove
(irrefutable= can't be disproved)
staunch
firmly committed; steadfast
nebulous
vague, hazy, indistinct
insolent
arrogant, insulting
attrition
weakening, wear away
abate
to reduce
sentient
(SEN shunt)
able to perceive by the senses; conscious
tacit
implied, not spoken
apotheosis
elevation of divine status; the perfect
example of something
wanton
malicious, unjustifiable, unprovoked,
egregious
(adj) wanton =
intemperate, wild
"a wanton life"
transitory
not lasting very long
preeminent
outstanding, supreme
circumvent
to frustrate as though by surrounding
sublime
awesome

(n)sublimity
corollary
something that follows,
a natural consequence
delineate
to describe accurately
(After Jack delineated
his plan, we had
no doubt what he
intended to do)
ebullient
(ih BUL yunt)
exuberant, enthusiasm
faction
a group united around a cause; disagreement within an organization
beget
to create, to lead to, to cause, to give birth to
invective
insulting speech, an insult
conjure
to summon or bring into being as if by magic
milieu
environment, surroundings
myriad
a huge number
nihilism
belief that there
are no values or
morals in the universe
stigmatize
to brand with disgrace
dissonant
incompatible, not harmonious
bemused
confused
ingenuous
(in JEN yoo us)
frank, without deception
(A young child is
ingenuous. He doesn't know much about the
ways of the world.)
ingenue= naive young woman
disingenuous
crafty or artful
amicable
polite friendliness
stratum
a layer, a level

strata= plural
artful
crafty, sly
aristocrat
of noble birth, snobbish
amenity
pleasantness, attractive feature
terse
succint
predilection
a natural preference for something
exalt
to glorify
contingent
dependent, possible
founder
to fail, to collapse, to sink
daunt
to make fearful, to intimidate
slavish
extremely servile
facile

(FAS il)
fluent; skillful in a superficial way; easy
disseminate
to spread seeds,
to scatter,
make widely known
equivocal
ambiguous, confusing
abortive
unsuccessful
inordinate
excessive, unreasonable
demagogue
a leader of the people, a rabble rouser
sensuous
to delight the senses, to stimulate OTHER peoples senses
sensual
gratifying ones own senses through physical pleasure
sensory
having to do with senses
incandescent
brilliant, giving off heat; light
insatiable
hard to satisfy, greedy
monolithic
massive, solid, unyielding
perennial
happening year after year, continual
provisional
conditional
allusion
an indirect reference, a hint
platitude
a dull or trite remark; a cliche

(a platitudinous speech)
contentious
argumentative, quarrelsome
philistine
a smugly ignorant person with no appreciation of intellectual or artistic matters
intransigent
uncompromising, stubborn
sanctimonious
pretending to be devout; affecting religious feeling
inexorable
relentless; inevitable; unavoidable

The inexorable waves pounded the shore.
expropriate
to take property officially
belie
to give a false impression, to contradict

Mel's smile belied the grief he was feeling.
abash
to embarrass; to make ashamed

Mia felt abashed by her inability to remember her lines.
(unabashedly = without shame)
malfeasance
an illegal act, especially by a public official

The Senator was convicted of a malfeasance.
pernicious
deadly, extremely evil
dissipate
to thin out, drift away
rapacious
greedy, plundering, avaricious

Wall Street bankers are often accused of being rapacious.
autocratic
ruling with absolute authority
promulgate
to proclaim, to publicly or formally declare something

The principal promulgated a new dress code.
beset
to harrass, to surround

The little town was beset by robberies.
subversive
corrupting, overthrowing, undermining, insurgent

The TV set becomes a subversive invention when it gets in the way your reading time.
ostensible
apparant (but misleading), professed

Bill's ostensible mission was to repair a phone, but his real goal was to spy on his boss's conversation.
usurp

(yoo SURP)
to seize wrongfully
(n) usurpation

The child thought that their mother's new boyfriend usurped his father's place in the family.
delude
to decieve
bureaucracy
inefficient, inflexible system of government
absolve
to forgive
infatuated
foolish; foolishly passionate
obfuscate
to darken, to confuse
accost
to approach and speak to someone aggressively
unctuous

(UNGK choo US)
oily (both literally and figuratively); insincere
malevolent
wishing harm
chasm
a deep, gaping hole; a gorge
peripatetic
wandering, traveling constantly
indulgent
lenient, yielding to desire
burgeon

(bur jun)
to expand, to flourish

(adj) burgeoning

"burgeoning weeds"
proletariat
the industrial working class
bereaved
deprived, or felt desolate
neologism

(nee OL uh jiz um)
a new word or phrase; a new usage of a word
circumspect
cautious
officious
annoyingly eager to help or advise
pervade
to spread throughout

(adj) pervasive
pristine
original, unspoiled, pure
choleric
hot-tempered; quick to anger
nefarious
evil; flagrantly wicked
contiguous
side by side, adjoining
contrived
artificial, labored
misappropriate
misuse of money
amnesty
official pardon
conducive
promoting
lugubrious
exhaggeratedly mournful
complicity
participation in wrongdoing; the act of being an accomplice
portentious
ominous, pompous or self-conciously serious; amazing or prodigious
blight
a disease in plants; anything that destroys
antithesis
direct opposite
portent
an omen; a sign of something coming in the future
nominal
in name only; insignificant; A-OK (during rocket launches)
gratuitious
uncalled for; unjustice
belabor
to go over repeatedly
epigraph
quotation at beginning of book or essay
exult
to rejoice, celebrate
quixotic
romantic or idealistic to an impractical degree
purported
rumored, claimed
profligate
extravagently wasteful, and usually wildly immoral
espouse
to support, to advocate
vitriolic
caustic, full of bitterness
prerogative
a right or privelege (especially linked to class or power position)
precursor
forerunner, something that goes before and anticipates for whatever it is that follows
arbitrate
weigh opposing directions
machinations
evil scheming activity
impotent
powerless, helpless
artifice
clever, trick, cunning
rogue
criminally dishonest person, scoundrel (usually used in playful sense)
polarize
to break up into opposing factions or groupings
petulant

(PECH ULANT)
rude, cranky, ill-tempered
palliate
to relieve or alleviate without getting rid of the problem
moribund
dying (usually used figuratively)
martial
warlike
magnanimous
forgiving, generous
requisite
required, necessary
immigrate
moving into a new country
epitome
paradigm, brief summary that captures the meaning as a whole
exacting
extremely demanding, receives great care or skill
effusion
pouring forth
solvent
not broke, able to pay one's bills
penitent
sorry
perfunctory
unenthusiastic, careless
abysmal
bottomless
ruminate
to contemplate, to ponder; to mull over
arduous
hard, difficult
decadent
decayed or decaying; especially in terms of morals
utilitarian
pragmatic
malign
slander
verisimilitude
similarity to reality, the appearance of truth, looks real
perterb
to disturb greatly
confluence
flowing together; a place where rivers flow together
blatant
unpleasantly noisy, glaring
disfranchise

(or disenfranchise)
to take away citizen priveleges (especially with voting)
inert
inactive, sluggish
mendicant
beggar
chronicle
a record of events in order of time; a history
imperious
bossy, usually arrogant
awry

(uh RYE)
off-course, twisted to one side
inept
clumsy, incompetent
salient

(SAYL YUNT)
sticking out; conspicious; leaping
precipitate
to cause to happen abruptly

(adj) unwisely or rash
"a precipitate decision"
precipitous
steep (used figurately and literally)
qualify
to modify or restrict

(unqualified success = complete unrestricted success)
intractable
uncontrollable, stubborn, disobedient
hegemony
leadership; especially national leadership over another nation
incorrigible
incapable of being reformed
litigate
to try in court
forbear
to refrain from; to abstain
burlesque
a ludicrous mocking or imitation
illicit
illegal, not permitted
connoisseur
an expert, especially in the area of art or taste
compendium
a summary, an abridgement
ponderous
clumsily large; massive; dull
insular
like an island, isolated
anomaly
irregularity
indigent

(IN di junt)
poor
manifesto
a public declaration of beliefs
insolvent
broke

(n) insolvency
incense
to make very angry

Jeremy was incensed when I told him he was stupid.
countenance

(KOWN tuh nuns)
face; facial expression, especially an encouraging one
misapprehension
misunderstanding
proselytize
to convert or recruit converters from one religion or doctrine to another
arcane
mysterious, known by a select few
bequest
something left to someone in a will
preempt
to seize something by prior right

(preemptive action = action undertaken to prevent some other action from being undertaken)
replete
completely filled; abounding
plethora

(PLETH ur ah)
an excess
oblique
indirect; at an angle
discreet
prudent, judiciously reserved
convivial
fond of partying; festive
cogent

(KOH junt)
powerfully convincing
egalitarian
believing in social and economical equality
glut
overabundance; surplus
fauna
animals
assiduous
hardworking, busy, diligent
aggregate
sum total
bequeath
to leave something to someone at a will
charlatan
fraud, con-man
aberration
deviation from the standard
incipient
beginning, emerging
recapitulate
to summarize
gauche
socially awkward
reparation
paying back

(irreparable = can't be fixed [i REP uh ruh bul])
creditable
worthy of credit or praise
sedition
treason

"charged with sedition"
credence
belief or international acceptance

(if something is credible, it may gain credence)
epithet
term (usually disparaging) used to characterize someone
arbiter
judge
acrimonious
full of spite, bitter
foment

(foh MENT)
to stir up, to instigate
exonerate
to free from blame
wistful
yearning, sadly longing
remonstrate
to argue against, to protest
secular
having nothing to do with religion or spiritual concerns
stipulate
to require something as part of an agreement
succint

(SUK singkt)
brief, concise
intrepid
to be fearless
unwitting
unintentional, ignorant, not aware
veracity
truthfulness

(n) veracious = truthful
stricture
a restriction; a negative criticism
exigency

(EK si jen see)
an emergency; an urgency
extrapolate
to extract or deduce from something known; infer
rudimentary
basic, crude, uninformed or underdeveloped
genteel
polite, aristocratic, affected refinement
categorical
unconditional, absolute
recondite

(REK un dyte)
hard to understand, over one's head
flora
plants
fecund
fertile, productive
grandiloquent
pompous, using fancy words to impress
pedantic
boringly scholarly

pedant [pe dunt]
pedantry [ped un tree]
painstaking
extremely careful
mellifluous
sweetly flowing
maudlin
silly and overly sentimental
harbinger

(HAR bin jur)
forefunner; a signal of

"Warm weather is a harbinger of spring."
inundate

(in YOON date)
to flood, to overwhelm
frenetic
frantic; frenzied
figurative
metaphorical; based on figures of speech
fetter
to restrain; to hamper

(antonymn: unfettered)
farcical
absurd, ludicrous
facetious

(FA see shus)
humourous; not serious, clumsily humorous
euphemism
pleasant expression used in place of offensive one

("Taking the big bus uptown, was her euphanism for dying and going to heaven")
implicit
implied, indirectly expressed
maxim
a fundamental principle, an old saying
collusion
conspiracy, secret cooperation
sagacious
discerning; shrewd
squalor
filth, wretched, degrading
substantive
real; essential
transient
not staying a long time; temporary
apocalypse
a prophetic revelation, concerning the end of the world
debacle
violent breakdown, defeat
conjecture
to guess, to deduce
strife
bitter conflict, discord; a struggle or clash
libel

(LYE bul)
written falsehook intended to defame
appropriate
to take without permission; to set aside for particular use
coup

(KOO)
a brilliant victory; the violent overthrow of government
vex
to annoy, to pester, to confuse

(a vexed issue = a troubling issue)
vernacular
everyday speech; slang; idom
discrete
unconnected; separate; distinct
equitable
fair
chimera

(Kye MEER uh)
an illusion; a foolish fancy
recrimination
a bitter counteraccusation
(adj. recriminatory)

Melissa was full or recrimination when I accused her of stealing.
edify
to enlighten, to instruct (moral and religious)

The teacher aimed to edify her student and not force facts down their throats.
hermetic
airtight; impervious to external influence
reprisal
an act of taking revenge for another
forsake
to abandon; to renounce; to relinquish
expatriate
to move away, or get thrown out of one's native land
touchstone
a standard, a test of authenticity or quality
enfranchise
to grant citizen priveleges (especially voting)
distend
to swell, to extend a great deal
oblivion
total forgetfulness
emigrate
to move to a new country

The family emigrated to the U.S. from Poland.
egregious
extremely bad
denizen
inhabitant
duplicity
double dealing, deception
dubeity
uncertainty

(adj.) dubious
flounder
to move clumsily, or in confusion
tenable
defensible, capable of being argued successfully; valid

(untenable = unable to be defended)
precedent
an earlier example or model of something
urbane
poised, sophisticated, refined
debauchery
wild living
peruse
to read carefully

(peruse doesn't mean to skim or read quickly!)
perquisite
a privelege that goes along with a job; a perk
austere

(aw steer)
without excess
unconscionable

(un kahn shuh nuh bul)
not controlled by conscience; unscrupulous
narcissism
excessive love of one's body or oneself
microcosm
a world in miniature

Our college, which has many U.S.-born and international students, is a microcosm of the larger world.
mentor
a teacher, tutor, counselor, or coach
labyrinth
a maze; something like a maze
lampoon
to satarize; to mock; to parody
fraternal
like brothers

The fraternal feelings of the group were strengthened by the monthly fishing trips.
avuncular
like an uncle, especially a nice uncle
autonomous
acting independantly
absolute
unlimited, perfect
steadfast
loyal; faithful
dystopia
far from an ideal society
reiterate
to say again; to repeat
penitent
sorry; repentant; contrite
parody
a satirical imitation

At the talent show the girls sang a terrible parody of "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones.
emulate
to strive to equal or excel, usually through imitation
egocentric
selfish; believing that one is the center of everything
uninterested
don't care about knowing something
disinterested
not taking sides; unbiased
deduce
to conclude from the evidence; to infer
compelling
forceful; causing to yield
cohere
to hold together

(coherent = making sense)
antithesis

(an TITH uh sis)
the direct opposite
conventional
common; customary; unexceptional
partisan
one who supports a particular person, cause, or idea
contentious
argumentative; quarrelsome
allusion
an indirect reference to something else, especially something in literature; a hint
inherent
part of the essential nature of something; intrinsic
cynic
one who deeply distrusts human nature; one who believes people are motivated only by selfishness
exposition
expounding or explaining; explanatory treatise
consensus
unanimity or near unanimity, everyone is in agreement
sagacious
wise; possessing wisdom derived from experience and learning
discourse
to converse; to formally discuss a subject
sanction
authorize or approve; ratify or confirm
genial
cheerful and pleasant; friendly; helpful
levee
an embankment designed to prevent the flooding of the river
erratic
unpredictable or wandering
abstinent
abstaining; voluntarily not doing something
exuberant
extremely joyful or vigorous; profuse in growth
impede
to hinder; to obstruct; to slow something down
audacity
boldness; reckless daring; impertinence
indignant
angry, especially as a result of something unjust or unworthy
renaissance
a rebirth or revival

(renascence = renaissance)
feasible
able to be done
genre

(john ruh)
an artistic class or category
mandatory
authoritatively ordered or commanded; necessary
idyllic
charming in a rustic way; naturally peaceful
pristine
original; unspoiled; pure
prodigy
an extremely talented child; an extraordinary accomplishment or occurrence
frugal
economical; penny-pinching
pathology
the science of diseases; any deviation from a healthy, normal condition
plumb
to measure the depth of something
visionary
a dreamer; someone with impractical goals or ideas about the future
dissonant
inharmonious; in disagreement
substantive
having substance; real; essential; solid; substantial
flippant
frivolously shallow and disrespectful
judicious
exercising sound judgment
piquant
pungent
impromptu
without preparation; on the spur of the moment
parallel
a comparison made between two things
sterile
unimaginative; unfruitful; infertile
foster
to promote the growth or development of
goad
to urge forcefully; to taunt someone into doing something
implement
to carry out
malleable
easy to shape or bend
pungent
forceful; sharp or biting to the taste or smell
savor
to linger on the taste or smell of something
correlate
to find or show the relationship of two things
facetious

(fa see shus)
humorous; not serious; clumsily humorous
kinship
natural or family relationship
rampart
a fortification; a bulwark or defense
incisive
cutting right to the heart of the matter
abstemious
sparing or moderate, especially in eating or drinking
inquisitive
inclined to investigate; eager for knowledge; curious
vigor
strength; liveliness
vulnerable
in danger; unprotected

"We are vulnerable both by water and land, without either fleet or army" Alexander Hamilton."
modest
shy; reserved; not extreme

"a modest price"
progressive
moving forward

"progressive change
plausible
believable

"a plausible excuse"
exotic
foreign; uncommon; from a distant place; unusual

"exotic tropical plants in a greenhouse"
incidental
occurring accidentally; by the side; of less importance

"incidental expenses"
effectual
producing or sufficient to produce a desired effect; effective
swindler
a cheat; a con man

"swindled money from the company"
weight
importance

"The weight of the evidence is against the defendant."
kindle
to begin to burn

"No spark had yet kindled in him an intellectual passion" George Eliot."
trunk
the main body of something
synchronize
to cause to act on the same schedule

"they synchronized their trip with the annual tulip festival."
swagger
to strut; to walk or conduct oneself with an insolent or arrogant air;
table

(verb)
to remove from consideration (a piece of legislation, for example)
tailor

(verb)
to shape or alter for a particular purpose

"a speech that was tailored to an audience of business leaders"
raucous
harsh or rough-sounding

"raucous laughter"
stupor
mental confusion

"a drunken stupor"
scale

(verb)
to climb up

"scaled the peak"
wooden

(adjective)
stiff; inflexible

"a wooden performance; a wooden smile"
surmise
to guess
newfangled
new; untested

"newfangled ideas"
stratagem
a trick or deception
undermine
to weaken the support of

"Late hours can undermine one's health."
flower

(verb)
to flourish; to mature well

"His artistic talents flowered early."
uphold
to maintain or fight for

"upheld the banner proudly"
protrude
to push outward
uncouth
ill-mannered
preposterous
unbelievable; implausible
residual
left over when something is gone
hasten
to quicken; to speed up

"fanned the wet paint to hasten drying"
summons
an order to appear in court
effervescent
bubbly
suppress
to hold down; to hold back

"suppress a smile"
subside
to sink; to become less active
impose
to establish on others by force or authority

"impose a tax"
resplendent
brilliant
lure
an attraction
sobriety
seriousness; gravity in bearing, manner, or treatment
threadbare
overused to the point of being worn out; tattered

"threadbare excuses"
unsung
unrecognized; uncelebrated

"an unsung hero"
rectify
to correct; to straighten; to make amends for
gaunt
thin and bony, especially from illness or lack of food
tightfisted
greedy
fitful
irregular; subject to sudden, violent outbursts
din
loud noise
chary
careful; cautious; wary

"was chary of the risks involved"
loll
to hang out lazily

"lolled his head on the armrest"
apprise
to inform

"apprised us of our rights"
abase
to humiliate; to lower in esteem or dignity; to humble

"I abased myself in front of the principal because I figured I had to in order to keep from being expelled."
ballyhoo
sensational advertising or promotion; uproar

"The candidate tried to give his speech, but his words could not be heard above the ballyhoo on the convention floor."
blanch
to turn pale; to cause to turn pale

"The hot, dry summer had left the leaves on the trees looking blanched and dry."
capacious
spacious; roomy; commodious

(Something that is capacious has a large capacity)
consign
to hand over; to assign; to entrust; to banish

"Upon her retirement, Dinah consigned to her co-workers the contents of her desk."
conjugal

(KAHN juh gul)
having to do with marriage
importune
to urge with annoying persistence; to trouble

"Sorry to importune you again, but can I borrow your ipod?"
impregnable
unconquerable; able to withstand attack; impenetrable

"Again and again, the army unsuccessfully attacked the fortress, only to conclude that it was impregnable."
lascivious

(luh SIV ee us)
lustful; obscene, lewd

"Clarence's lascivious comments made his female associates extremely uncomfortable."
queue

(kyoo)
a line or file OR (v.) to line or file

"The people standing in a long queue were waiting for movie tickets."
vacuous
empty of content; lacking in ideas or intelligence
supine
lying on one's back

"Shirley lay supine on her deck chair, soaking up the sunshine and, in the process, turning her complexion into leather."
listless
sluggish; without energy or enthusiasm

(the noun is listlessness)
fulminate
to denounce vigorously; to protest vehemently against something

"The old man sat in his room fulminating."
epicure
a person with refined taste in wine and food

(The adjective is epicurean)
disconcert
to upset; to ruffle; to perturb

"The boos of the audience did not disconcert Bob; he droned on with his endless, boring speech regardless."
chortle
to chuckle with glee

(A chortle is a cross between a chuckle and a snort. The term was coined by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking Glass.)
cipher

(SYE fer)
zero; a nobody; a code; the solution to a code

(To decipher a coded message is to decode it. To encipher a message is to put it into code.)
doldrums
low spirits; a state of inactivity

(doldrums is almost always preceded by 'the')

"Meredith has been in the doldrums ever since her pet bees flew away.""
divulge
to reveal, especially to reveal something that has been a secret

"We begged and pleaded, but we couldn't persuade Lester to divulge the secret of his chocolate-chip cookies."
imbue
to inspire; to permeate or tinge

"Henrietta soaked her white dress in a bathtub of tea to imbue it with a subtle tan color."
sally
a sudden rushing attack; an excursion; an expedition; a repartee; a clever rejoinder

"he made a lightning-fast sally into the living room" OR "they took a sally down Newbury Street" OR "his quick-witted sally made the whole class laugh"
ribald

(RIB uld)
indecent or vulgar; off-color

(Ribald language or horsing around is called ribaldry (RIB uld ree))
render
to make; to cause to be; to provide; to depict

"Steve's funny faces rendered his sister incoherent with laughter."
propound
to set forth or propose; to offer for consideration

(Propound, propose, and proposition have the same root; a Latin word meaning to set forth)
occult
supernatural; magical; mystical

"occult rituals"
harry

(HAR ee)
to harass; to annoy

(the adjective is 'harried')
confer
to exchange ideas; to consult with; to bestow

"The referees conferred briefly before ruling that the pass had been incomplete."
concomitant

(kun KAHM uh tunt)
following from; accompanying; going along with

"Along with his large cash donation, the philanthropist made a concomitant promise to support the new library with smaller gifts in the coming years."
cabal

(kuh bal)
a group of conspirators; the acts of such a group; a clique

"The high-level cabal against the company's president accelerated rapidly and resulted in her ouster."
fawn
to exhibit affection; to seek favor through flattery; to kiss up to someone

"The old women fawned over the new baby."
expiate
to make ammends for; to atone for

(The act of 'expiating' is 'expiation')
evince
to demonstrate convincingly; to prove

"The soldiers evinced great courage, but their mission was hopeless, and they were defeated rapidly."
stalwart
sturdily built; robust; valiant; unwavering

"Ernie has been a stalwart friend through thick and thin, even when I used to pretend not to recognize him in the hall."
faux

(foh)
false

(A faux pas (foh pah) literally means false step, but is used to mean an embarrassing social mistake.)
benighted
ignorant; unenlightened

"Not one of Mr. Emerson's benighted students could say with certainty in which century the Second World War had occurred."
refractory
disobedient and hard to manage; resisting treatment

"Bobby is such a refractory little boy when it comes to haircuts that he has to be tied up and hoisted into the barber's chair."
licentious

(lye SEN shus)
lascivious; lewd; promiscuous; amoral

(The act or state of being 'licentious' is 'licentiousness'. The Puritans saw licentiousness almost everywhere."
litany
recital or list; tedious recounting

"Ruth's litany of complaints about her marriage to Tom is longer than most children's letters to Santa."
opprobrious

(uh PROH bree us)
damning; extremely critical; disgraceful

('Opprobrium' is reproach, scorn, or disgrace.)
halcyon

(HAL see un)
peaceful; carefree; serene

"These halcyon skies are a good harbinger of a pleasant vacation."
melee

(MAY lay)
a brawl; a confused fight or struggle; a violent free-for-all; tumultuous confusion
quintessential

(kwin tuh SEN chul)
being the most perfect example of

(The noun is 'quintessence' (kwin TES uns). When you have reduced something to its most pure and concentrated form, you have captured its quintessance.)
quaint
pleasantly old-fashioned; picturesque

"a quaint old cottage"
resplendent
brilliantly shining; radiant; dazzling

"Betsy's gown looked resplendent in the candlelight."
canon
a rule or law, especially a religious one; a body of rules or laws; an official set of holy books; an authoritative list; the set of works by an author that are accepted as authentic
adduce
to bring forward as an example or as proof; to cite

"In support of his client's weak case, the lawyer adduced a few weak precedents from English common law."
apropos

(ap ruh POH)
appropriate; coming at the right time

"Susan's loving toast at the wedding dinner was apropos; the clown suit she wore while making it was not."
delinquent
neglecting a duty or law; late in payment

"The delinquent father failed to show up for visits with his children from his first marriage."
demur

(di MUR)
to object; to take exception

"Diego demurred when I suggested that he eat the entire plate of 'seriously spicy' chicken wings at Fred's Diner."
rapant
widespread; uncontrollable; prevalent; raging

"A rampant horde of squealing fans swarmed the rock star."
limpid
transparant; clear; lucid

"Theodora's poetry has a limpid quality that makes other writers' efforts sound stiff and overformal."
corporeal

(kawr PAWR ee ul)
material; tangible; having substance, like the body

"Steve was mildly crazy; he believed that at night his thoughts became corporeal and wandered around the house eating potato chips and doing laundry."
champion

(as a verb)
to defend; to support

"During his campaign, the governor had championed a lot of causes that he promptly forgot about once he was elected."
askance

(uh SKANS)
with suspicion or disapproval

"When Herman said that he repaired the car by pouring apple cider into its gas tank, Jerry looked at him askance."
inimical

(i NIM i kul)
unfavorable; harmful; detrimental; hostile

"The reviews of his exhibition were so inimical that Charles never painted another picture again."
quasi
almost; near; resembling

(this word is always used in combination with other words)

"our invention was a quasi-success" "he came up with a quasi-plausible excuse"
menagerie

(muh NAJ uh ree)
a collection of animals
infringe
to violate; to encroach or trespass

(an act of 'infringing' is an 'infringement')
impetuous

(im PECH oo wus)
rash; overimpulsive; headlong

"Jeremy is so impetuous that he ran out and bought an engagement ring for a girl who smiled at him in the subway."
obeisance
a bow or curtsy; deep reverence

"When the substitute teacher walked into the room, the entire class rose to its feet in mocking obeisance to her."
paroxysm
a sudden, violent outburst; a severe attack

"Sheldon flew into a paroxysm of rage and threw his books across the room after finding that his house has been burglarized."
preponderance
superiority in weight, number, size, extent, influence, etc.; majority; predominance

"preponderance of onions in the beef stew"
facade

(fuh SAHD)
the false front of a building; the false front or misleading appearance of anything

"Gretchen's kindness is just a facade; she is really a hostile, scheming creep."
estimable
worthy of admiration; capable of being estimated

(Something that cannot be estimated is 'inestimable')
excise
to remove by cutting, or as if by cutting

(The noun form of the word is 'excision')
congeal

(kun JEEL)
to solidify; to jell

"The bacon grease congealed into a smooth white mass when we put the skillet in the freezer."
suffuse

(suh FYOOZ)
to cover; to overspread; to saturate

(Adj: suffuse (suh FYOOS))
vogue
fashion; style

(To be in vogue, or susceptible to vogues, is to be voguish (VOHG ish))
insurrection
an act of open rebellion against authority; a revolt

(synonyms: revolt, uprising, rebellion, rising)
debase
to lower in quality or value; to degrade

"To deprive a single person of his or her constitutional rights debases the liberty of us all."
crux
the central point; the essence

(usually followd by "of the matter")

"The crux of the matter is the heart of the matter."
gambit
a scheme to gain an advantage; a ploy

"My young son said he wanted a drink of water, but I knew that his request was merely a gambit to stay up later."
prowess
exceptional skill or strength; uncommon bravery

"Although he boasts of having great prowess in the kitchen, Dudley knows how to make nothing but toast."
teem
to swarm; to be inundated; to overrun

"On a clear night high in the mountains, the sky teems with stars."
foray

(FAWR ay)
a quick raid or attack; an initial venture

"The young soldier's ill-fated foray into the woods ended with his capture by an enemy patrol."
inalienable

(in AY lee un uh bul)
sacred; incapable of being transferred, lost, or taken away

"In my household, we believe that people are born with inalienable rights to have desserts after meals."
quandary
state of perplexity; predicament; dilemma

"Joe is in a quandary; tomorrow he's scheduled to marry three different women in three different towns."
underlying
basic; fundamental; only noticeable under scrutiny

"The underlying cause of the cult's disintegration was not faithlessness but homesickness on the part of its members."
wizened

(WIZ und)
shriveled; withered; shrunken

"A few wizened apples were all found on the tree; all the nice ones had already been picked."
schism

(SIZ um)
division; separation; discord or disharmony
pundit
an expert; an authority; a learned person

"I can never decide what the most important issues of the day are, so I let the pundits who write the columns on the editorial page tell me."
dissemble
to conceal the real nature of; to act or speak falsely in order to deceive

"Anne successfully dissembled her hatred for Beth."
disquiet
to make uneasy

"The movie's graphic depiction of childbirth disquieted the children, who had been expecting a story about a stork."
fester
to generate pus; to decay

"For many years, resentment had festered beneath the surface of the apparantly happy organization."
lout

(LOWt)
boor; oaf; clod

(to be a 'lout' or act like a 'lout' is to be 'loutish')
desist
to stop doing (something)

"Rachel was slurping her soup loudly when Greta asked her to desist."
demure

(di MYOOR)
shy; reserved; sedate

"Jenna was a demure child; she sat quietly next to her mother with her hands folded on her lap."
compunction
remorse; a feeling of uneasiness at doing something wrong

"Ms. Riley had no compunction about overeating if she thought that her meal was low in fat."
churl
a rude person; a boor

(to be a 'churl' is to be 'churlish')
cataclysm

(KAT uh kliz um)
a violent upheaval; an earthquake; a horrible flood

"Suddenly, the sky opened, and the clouds unleashed a cataclysm that nearly washedd away the town."
defile
to make filthy or foul; to desecrate

"The snowy field was so beautiful that I hated to defile it by driving across it."
deign

(dayn)
to condescend; to think it in accordance with one's dignity

"wouldn't deign to greet the servant who opened the door"
discomfit
to frustrate; to confuse

"I was discomfited by my secretary's apparant inability to type and answer the telephone."
extant
still in existance

"Paul rounded up all extant copies of his embarrassing first novel and had them destroyed."
query
a question; an inquiry

"Please any queries for the end of the lecture, or the professor will lose his train of thought and start singing the national anthem."
reactionary
ultraconservative; right-wing; backward-thinking

"Grandpa Gus is so reactionary that he doesn't think women should be allowed to vote."
recidivism

(ri SID uh viz um)
the act of repeating an offense

"There's not much evidence that imprisoning people reforms them; the rate of recidivism among released convicts is high."
tumult
violent, noisy commotion; uproar; outbreak

"Such a tumult breaks out when the end-of-school bell rings that the teachers have learned to jump onto their desks to avoid being trampled."
titillate
to excite; to stimulate; to tease

"Appetizers are supposed to titillate people's appetites, not stuff them to the gills."
defunct
no longer in effect; no longer in existence

"The long spell of extremely hot weather left my entire garden defunct."
converse

(KAHN vurs)
the opposite

"Freddy followed not the rule but its converse; that is, he did the opposite of what he was supposed to do."
lax
negligent; lazy; irresponsible

(noun= laxity)
propogate
to reproduce; to multiply; to spread or disseminate

"It shocked the nation when Tom gave up his career in professional basketball and devoted his life to propogating tree fungi."
privation
lack of comforts or necessities; poverty

"Oh, come on, Karen! Not having an indoor swimming pool isn't exactly a privation, you know!"
secede
to withdraw from an alliance

"When the southern states seceded from the Union, they probably never expected to create quite as much of a ruckus as they did."
repose

(ri POHZ)
rest; tranquility; relaxation

"Her husband lolled back on the sofa in an attitude of repose."
sententious

(sen TEN shus)
preachy; pompous; excessively moralizing; self-righteous

"I can stand a boring lecture, but not a sententious one!"
supersede
to take the place of; to supplant; to make (something) obsolete

"Every few minutes, someone introduces a new antiaging cream that allegedly supersedes all the existing antiaging creams on the market."
iridescent
displaying glowing, changing colors

"It's strange to think that plain old gasoline can create such a lovely iridescent sheen on the water's surface."
ominous
threatening, menacing, portentous

"ominous black clouds"
malice
ill will; a desire to harm

(adj) malicious
scale

(v)
to climb up

"scaled the peak"
noisome
offensive or disgusting; stinking; noxious

"The noisome brown liquid seeping out of the floor of my bathroom certainly isn't water."
mire
marshy, stuck, mucky ground

"I'm mired in a sewing project and I can't get away."
motley
extremely varied or diverse; heterogeneous; multicolored

"Louise's friends are a motley group of artists, bankers, and sanitation engineers."
sanction


(2nd definition)
punitive measure

"For many years international sanctions in South Africa included the banning of athletes from competing in the Olympics."
revel

(REV ul)
to enjoy thoroughly; to take delight in; to carouse

"Ken is reveling in luxury now that he has finally come into his patrimony."
stout
plump; stocky; substantial

"Mr. Barton was built a little bit like a beach ball; he was stout in the middle and skinny at either end."
abeyance
suspension; temporary cessation

"Joe's poverty kept his addiction to video games in abeyance."