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988 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
  • 3rd side (hint)
abase
(v.) to humiliate, degrade
abate
(v.) to reduce, lessen
abdicate
(v.) to give up a position, usually one of leadership
abduct
(v.) to kidnap, take by force
aberration
(n.) something that differs from the norm
abet
(v.) to aid, help, encourage
abhor
(v.) to hate, detest
abide
1. (v.) to put up 2. (v.)to remain
abject
(adj.) wretched, pitiful
abjure
(v.) to reject, renounce
abnegation
(n.) denial of comfort to oneself
abort
(v.) to give up on a half-finished project or effort
abridge
1. (v.)to cut down, shorten 2. (adj.) Shortened
abrogate
(v.) to abolish, usually by authority
abscond
(v.) to sneak away and hide
absolution
(n.) freedom from blame, guilt, sin
abstain
(v.) to freely choose not to commit an action
abstruse
(adj.) hard to comprehend
accede
(v.) to agree
accentuate
(v.) to stress, highlight
accessible
(adj.) obtainable, reachable
acclaim
(n.) high praise
accolade
(n.) high praise, special distinction
accommodating
(adj.) helpful, obliging, polite
accord
(n.) an agreement
accost
(v.) to confront verbally
accretion
(n.) slow growth in size or amount
acerbic
(adj.) biting, bitter in tone or taste
acquiesce
(v.) to agree without protesting
acrimony
(n.) bitterness, discord
acumen
(n.) keen insight
acute
1. (adj.) sharp, severe 2. (adj.) having keen insight
adamant
(adj.) impervious, immovable, unyielding
adept
(adj.) extremely skilled
adhere
1.(n.)to stick to something 2. (n.) to follow devoutly
admonish
(v.) to caution, criticize, reprove
adorn
(v.)to decorate (We adorned the tree with ornaments.)
adroit
(adj.)skillful, dexterous
adulation
(n.)extreme praise
adumbrate
(v.) to sketch out in a vague way
adverse
(adj.) antagonistic, unfavorable, dangerous
advocate
1. (v.) to argue in favor of something 2. (n.) a person who argues in favor of something
aerial
(adj.) somehow related to the air
aesthetic
(adj.) artistic, related to the appreciation of beauty
affable
(adj.) friendly, amiable
affinity
(n.)a spontaneous feeling of closeness
affluent
(adj.) rich, wealthy
affront
(n.) an insult
aggrandize
(v.) to increase or make greater
aggregate
1. (n.) a whole or total 2. (v.) to gather into a mass
aggrieved
(adj.) distressed, wronged, injured
agile
(adj.) quick, nimble
agnostic
(adj.) believing that the existence of God cannot be proven or disproven
agriculture
(n.) farming
aisle
(n.) a passageway between rows of seats
alacrity
(n.) eagerness, speed
alias
(n.) a false name or identity
allay
(v.) to soothe, ease
allege
(v.) to assert, usually without proof
alleviate
(v.) to relieve, make more bearable
allocate
(v.) to distribute, set aside
aloof
(adj.) reserved, distant
altercation
(n.) a dispute, fight
amalgamate
(v.) to bring together, unite
ambiguous
(adj.) uncertain, variably interpretable
ambivalent
(adj.) having opposing feelings
ameliorate
(v.) to improve
amenable
(adj.) willing, compliant
amenity
(n.) an item that increases comfort
amiable
(adj.) friendly)
amicable
(adj.) friendly
amorous
(adj.) showing love, particularly sexual
amorphous
(adj.) without definite shape or type
anachronistic
(adj.) being out of correct chronological order
analgesic
(n.) something that reduces pain
analogous
(adj.) similar to, so that an analogy can be drawn
anarchist
(n.) one who wants to eliminate all government
anathema
(n.) a cursed, detested person
anecdote
(n.) a short, humorous account
anesthesia
(n.) loss of sensation
anguish
(n.) extreme sadness, torment
animated
(adj.) lively
annex
1. (v.) to incorporate territory or space.) 2. (n.) a room attached to a larger room or space
annul
(v.) to make void or invalid
anomaly
(n.) something that does not fit into the normal order
anonymous
(adj.) being unknown, unrecognized
antagonism
(n.) hostility
antecedent
(n.) something that came before
antediluvian
(adj.) ancient
anthology
(n.) a selected collection of writings, songs, etc.
antipathy
(n.) a strong dislike, repugnance
antiquated
(adj.) old, out of date
antiseptic
(adj.) clean, sterile
antithesis
(n.) the absolute opposite
anxiety
(n.) intense uneasiness
apathetic
(adj.) lacking concern, emotion
apocryphal
(adj.) fictitious, false, wrong
appalling
(adj.) inspiring shock, horror, disgust
appease
(v.) to calm, satisfy
appraise
(v.) to assess the worth or value of
apprehend
1. (v.) to seize, arrest 2. (v.) to perceive, understand, grasp
approbation
(n.) praise
appropriate
(v.) to take, make use of
aquatic
(adj.) relating to water
arable
(adj.) suitable for growing crops
arbiter
(n.) one who can resolve a dispute, make a decision
arbitrary
(adj.) based on factors that appear random
arbitration
(n.) the process or act of resolving a dispute
arboreal
(adj.) of or relating to trees
arcane
(adj.) obscure, secret, known only by a few
archaic
(adj.) of or relating to an earlier period in time, outdated
archetypal
(adj.) the most representative or typical example of something
ardor
(n.) extreme vigor, energy, enthusiasm
arid
(adj.) excessively dry
arrogate
(v.) to take without justification
artifact
(n.) a remaining piece from an extinct culture or place
artisan
(n.) a craftsman
ascertain
(v.) to perceive, learn
ascertain, rhymes with obtain, to GET knowledge
ascetic
(adj.) practicing restraint as a means of self-discipline, usually religious
ascribe
(v.) to assign, credit, attribute to
aspersion
(n.) a curse, expression of ill-will
aspire
(v.) to long for, aim toward
assail
(v.) to attack
assess
(v.) to evaluate
assiduous
(adj.) hard-working, diligent
assuage
(v.) to ease, pacify
astute
(adj.) very clever, crafty
asylum
1. (n.) a place of refuge, protection, a sanctuary 2. (n.) an institution in which the insane are kept
atone
(v.) to repent, make amends
atrophy
(v.) to wither away, decay
attain
(v.) to achieve, arrive at
attribute
1. (v.) to credit, assign 2. (n.) a facet or trait
atypical
(adj.) not typical, unusual
audacious
(adj.) excessively bold
audible
(adj.) able to be heard
augment
(v.) to add to, expand
auspicious
(adj.) favorable, indicative of good things
austere
(adj.) very bare, bleak
avarice
(n.) excessive greed
avenge
(v.) to seek revenge
aversion
(n.) a particular dislike for something
balk
(v.) to stop, block abruptly
ballad
(n.) a love song
banal
(adj.) dull, commonplace
bane
(n.) a burden
bard
(n.) a poet, often a singer as well
bashful
(adj.) shy, excessively timid
battery
1.(n.) a device that supplies power 2. (n.)assault, beating
beguile
(v.) to trick, deceive
behemoth
(n.) something of tremendous power or size
benevolent
(adj.) marked by goodness or doing good
benign
(adj.) favorable, not threatening, mild
bequeath
(v.) to pass on, give
berate
(v.) to scold vehemently
bereft
(adj.) devoid of, without
beseech
(v.) to beg, plead, implore
bias
(n.) a tendency, inclination, prejudice
bilk
(v.) cheat, defraud
blandish
(v.) to coax by using flattery
blemish
(n.) an imperfection, flaw
blight
1. (n.) a plague, disease 2. (n.) something that destroys hope
boisterous
(adj.) loud and full of energy
bombastic
(adj.) excessively confident, pompous
boon
(n.) a gift or blessing
bourgeois
(n.) a middle-class person, capitalist
brazen
(adj.) excessively bold, brash
brusque
(adj.) short, abrupt, dismissive
buffet
1. (v.) to strike with force 2. (n.) an arrangement of food set out on a table
burnish
(v.) to polish, shine
buttress
1. (v.) to support, hold up 2. (n.) something that offers support
cacophony
(n.) tremendous noise, disharmonious sound
cadence
(n.) a rhythm, progression of sound
cajole
(v.) to urge, coax
calamity
(n.) an event with disastrous consequences
calibrate
(v.) to set, standardize
callous
(adj.) harsh, cold, unfeeling
calumny
(n.) an attempt to spoil someone else’s reputation by spreading lies
camaraderie
(n.) brotherhood, jovial unity
comrade
candor
(n.) honesty, frankness
canny
(adj.) shrewd, careful
canvas
1. (n.) a piece of cloth on which an artist paints.) 2. (v.) to cover, inspect
capacious
(adj.) very spacious
capitulate
(v.) to surrender
capricious
(adj.) subject to whim, fickle
captivate
(v.) to get the attention of, hold
carouse
(v.) to party, celebrate
carp
(v.) to annoy, pester
catalog
1. (v.) to list, enter into a list 2. (n.) a list or collection
catalyze
(v.) to charge, inspire
caucus
(n.) a meeting usually held by people working toward the same goal
caustic
(adj.) bitter, biting, acidic
cavort
(v.) to leap about, behave boisterously
censure
1. (n.) harsh criticism 2. (v.) to rebuke formally
cerebral
(adj.) related to the intellect
chaos
(n.) absolute disorder
chastise
(v.) to criticize severely
cherish
(v.) to feel or show affection toward something
chide
(v.) to voice disapproval
choreography
(n.) the arrangement of dances
chronicle
1. (n.) a written history2. (v.) to write a history
chronological
(adj.) arranged in order of time
circuitous
(adj.) roundabout
circumlocution
(n.) indirect and wordy language
circumscribed
(adj.) marked off, bounded
circumspect
(adj.) cautious
circumvent
(v.) to get around
clairvoyant
(adj.) able to perceive things that normal people cannot
clamor
1. (n.) loud noise.) 2. (v.)to loudly insist
clandestine
(adj.) secret
cleave
1. (v.) to divide into parts 2. (v.) to stick together firmly
clemency
(n.) mercy
clergy
(n.) members of Christian holy orders
cloying
(adj.) sickeningly sweet
coagulate
(v.) to thicken, clot
coalesce
(v.) to fuse into a whole
cobbler
(n.) a person who makes or repairs shoes
coerce
(v.) to make somebody do something by force or threat
cogent
(adj.) intellectually convincing
cognizant
(adj.) aware, mindful
coherent
(adj.) logically consistent, intelligible
collateral
1. (adj.) secondary 2. (n.) security for a debt
colloquial
(adj.) characteristic of informal conversation
collusion
(n.) secret agreement, conspiracy
colossus
(n.) a gigantic statue or thing
combustion
(n.) the act or process of burning
commendation
(n.) a notice of approval or recognition
commensurate
(adj.) corresponding in size or amount
commodious
(adj.) roomy
compelling
(adj.) forceful, demanding attention
compensate
(v.) to make an appropriate payment for something
complacency
(n.) self-satisfied ignorance of danger
complement
(v.) to complete, make perfect
compliant
(adj.) ready to adapt oneself to another’s wishes
complicit
(adj.) being an accomplice in a wrongful act
compliment
(n.) an expression of esteem or approval
compound
1. (v.) to combine parts 2. (n.) a combination of different parts 3. (n.) a walled area containing a group of buildings
comprehensive
(adj.) including everything
compress
(v.) to apply pressure, squeeze together
compunction
(n.) distress caused by feeling guilty
com"punc"tion-punks always act like they are in distress
concede
(v.) to accept as valid
conciliatory
(adj.) friendly, agreeable
concise
(adj.) brief and direct in expression
concoct
(v.) to fabricate, make up
concomitant
(adj.) accompanying in a subordinate fashion
concord
(n.) harmonious agreement
condolence
(n.) an expression of sympathy in sorrow
condone
(v.) to pardon, deliberately overlook
conduit
(n.) a pipe or channel through which something passes
confection
(n.) a sweet, fancy food
confidant
(n.) a person entrusted with secrets
conflagration
(n.) great fire
confluence
(n.) a gathering together
conformist
(n.) one who behaves the same as others
confound
(v.) to frustrate, confuse
"conf"ound-"conf"using
congeal
(v.) to thicken into a solid
congenial
(adj.) pleasantly agreeable
congregation
(n.) a gathering of people, especially for religious services
congruity
(n.) the quality of being in agreement Vocabulary
connive
(v.) to plot, scheme
consecrate
(v.) to dedicate something to a holy purpose
consensus
(n.) an agreement of opinion
consign
(v.) to give something over to another’s care
consolation
(n.) an act of comforting
consonant
(adj.) in harmony
constituent
(n.) an essential part
constrain
(v.)to forcibly restrict
construe
(v.) to interpret
consummate
(v.) to complete a deal
consumption
(n.) the act of consuming
contemporaneous
(adj.) existing during the same time
contentious
(adj.) having a tendency to quarrel or dispute
contravene
(v.) to contradict, oppose, violate
contrite
(adj.) penitent, eager to be forgiven
contusion
(n.) bruise, injury
conundrum
(n.) puzzle, problem
convene
(v.) to call together
convention
1. (n.) an assembly of people 2. (n.) a rule, custom
convivial
(adj.) characterized by feasting, drinking, merriment
convoluted
(adj.) intricate, complicated
copious
(adj.) profuse, abundant
cordial
(adj.) warm, affectionate
coronation
(n.) the act of crowning
corpulence
(adj.)extreme fatness
corroborate
(v.) to support with evidence
corrosive
(adj.) having the tendency to erode or eat away
cosmopolitan
(adj.) sophisticated, worldly
counteract
(v.) to neutralize, make ineffective
coup
1. (n.) a brilliant, unexpected act 2. (n.) the overthrow of a government and assumption of authority
covet
(v.) to desire enviously
covert
(adj.) secretly engaged in
credulity
(n.) readiness to believe
crescendo
(n.) a steady increase in intensity or volume
criteria
(n.) standards by which something is judged
culmination
(n.) the climax toward which something progresses
culpable
(adj.) deserving blame
cultivate
(v.) to nurture, improve, refine
cumulative
(adj.) increasing, building upon itself
cunning
(adj.) sly, clever at being deceitful
cupidity
(n.) greed, strong desire
cursory
(adj.) brief to the point of being superficial
curt
(adj.) abruptly and rudely short
curtail
(v.) to lessen, reduce
daunting
(adj.) intimidating, causing one to lose courage
dearth
(n.) a lack, scarcity
debacle
(n.) a disastrous failure, disruption
debase
(v.) to lower the quality or esteem of something
debauch
(v.) to corrupt by means of sensual pleasures
debunk
(v.) to expose the falseness of something
decorous
(adj.) socially proper, appropriate
decry
(v.) to criticize openly
deface
(v.) to ruin or injure something’s appearance
defamatory
(adj.) harmful toward another’s reputation
defer
(v.) to postpone something
deferential
(adj.) showing respect for another’s authority
defile
(v.) to make unclean, impure
deft
(adj.) skillful, capable
defunct
(adj.) no longer used or existing
delegate
(v.) to hand over responsibility for something
deleterious
(adj.) harmful
deliberate
(adj.) intentional, reflecting careful consideration
delineate
(v.) to describe, outline, shed light on
de-line, let something that was previously crossed out appear again and be shown
demagogue
(n.) a leader who appeals to a people’s prejudices
demarcation
(n.) the marking of boundaries or categories
demean
(v.) to lower the status or stature of something
demure
(adj.) quiet, modest, reserved
denigrate
(v.) to belittle, diminish the opinion of
denounce
(v.) to criticize publicly
deplore
(v.) to feel or express sorrow, disapproval
depravity
(n.) wickedness
deprecate
(v.) to belittle, depreciate
derelict
(adj.) abandoned, run-down
deride
(v.) to laugh at mockingly, scorn
derivative
(adj.) taken directly from a source, unoriginal
desecrate
(v.) to violate the sacredness of a thing or place
desiccated
(adj.) dried up, dehydrated
desolate
(adj.) deserted, dreary, lifeless
despondent
(adj.) feeling depressed, discouraged, hopeless
despot
(n.) one who has total power and rules brutally
destitute
(adj.) impoverished, utterly lacking
deter
(v.) to discourage, prevent from doing
devious
(adj.) not straightforward, deceitful
dialect
(n.) a variation of a language
diaphanous
(adj.) light, airy, transparent
didactic
1. (adj.) intended to instruct 2. (adj.) overly moralistic
diffident
(adj.) shy, quiet, modest
diffuse
1. (v.) to scatter, thin out, break 2. (adj.) not concentrated, scattered, disorganized
dilatory
(adj.) tending to delay, causing delay
diligent
(adj.) showing care in doing one’s work
diminutive
(adj.) small or miniature
dirge
(n.) a mournful song, especially for a funeral
disaffected
(adj.) rebellious, resentful of authority
disavow
(v.) to deny knowledge of or responsibility for
discern
(v.) to perceive, detect
disclose
(v.) to reveal, make public
discomfit
(v.) to thwart, baffle
discordant
(adj.) not agreeing, not in harmony with
discrepancy
(n.) difference, failure of things to correspond
discretion
(n.) the quality of being reserved in speech or action
discursive
(adj.) rambling, lacking order
disdain
1. (v.) to scorn, hold in low esteem 2. (n.) scorn, low esteem
disgruntled
(adj.) upset, not content
disheartened
(adj.) feeling a loss of spirit or morale
disparage
(v.) to criticize or speak ill of
disparate
(adj.) sharply differing, containing sharply contrasting elements
dispatch
(v.) to send off to accomplish a duty
dispel
(v.) to drive away, scatter
disperse
(v.) to scatter, cause to scatter
disrepute
(n.) a state of being held in low regard
dissemble
(v.) to conceal, fake
disseminate
(v.) to spread widely
dissent
1. (v.) to disagree 2. (n.) the act of disagreeing
dissipate
1. (v.) to disappear, cause to disappear
dissonance
(n.) lack of harmony or consistency
dissuade
(v.) to persuade someone not to do something
distend
(v.) to swell out
dither
(v.) to be indecisive
divine
(adj.) godly, exceedingly wonderful
divisive
(adj.) causing dissent, discord
divulge
(v.) to reveal something secret
docile
(adj.) easily taught or trained
dogmatic
(adj.) aggressively and arrogantly certain about unproved principles
dormant
(adj.) sleeping, temporarily inactive
dour
(adj.)stern, joyless
dubious
(adj.) doubtful, of uncertain quality
duplicity
(n.) crafty dishonesty
duress
(n.) hardship, threat
dynamic
(adj.) actively changing
ebullient
(adj.) extremely lively, enthusiastic
eclectic
(adj.) consisting of a diverse variety of elements
ecstatic
(adj.) intensely and overpoweringly happy
edict
(n.) an order, decree
efface
(v.) to wipe out, obliterate, rub away
effervescent
(adj.) bubbly, lively
efficacious
(adj.) effective
effrontery
(n.) impudence, nerve, insolence
effulgent
(adj.) radiant, splendorous
egregious
(adj.) extremely bad
elaborate
(adj.) complex, detailed, intricate
elated
(adj.) overjoyed, thrilled
elegy
(n.) a speech given in honor of a dead person
elicit
(v.) to bring forth, draw out, evoke
eloquent
(adj.) expressive, articulate, moving
elucidate
(v.) to clarify, explain
elude
(v.) to evade, escape
emaciated
(adj.) very thin, enfeebled looking
embellish
1. (v.) to decorate, adorn 2. (v.)to add details to, enhance
embezzle
(v.) to steal money by falsifying records
emend
(v.) to correct or revise a written text
eminent
1. (adj.) distinguished, prominent, famous 2. (adj.) conspicuous
emollient
(adj.) soothing
emote
(v.) to express emotion
empathy
(n.) sensitivity to another’s feelings as if they were one’s own
empirical
1. (adj.) based on observation or experience 2. (adj.) capable of being proved or disproved by experiment
emulate
(v.) to imitate
enamor
(v.) to fill with love, fascinate, usually used in passive form followed by “of” or “with”
encore
(n.) the audience’s demand for a repeat performance, also the artist’s performance in response to that demand
encumber
(v.) to weigh down, burden
enervate
(v.) to weaken, exhaust
enfranchise
(v.) to grant the vote to
engender
(v.) to bring about, create, generate
enigmatic
(adj.) mystifying, cryptic
enmity
(n.) ill will, hatred, hostility
ennui
(n.) boredom, weariness
entail
(v.) to include as a necessary step
enthrall
(v.) to charm, hold spellbound
ephemeral
(adj.) short-lived, fleeting
epistolary
(adj.) relating to or contained in letters
epitome
(n.) a perfect example, embodiment
equanimity
(n.) composure
equivocal
(adj.) ambiguous, uncertain, undecided
erudite
(adj.) learned
eschew
(v.) to shun, avoid
esoteric
(adj.) understood by only a select few
espouse
(v.) to take up as a cause, support
ethereal
(adj.) heavenly, exceptionally delicate or refined
etymology
(n.) the history of words, their origin and development
euphoric
(adj.) elated, uplifted
evanescent
(adj.) fleeting, momentary
evince
(v.) to show, reveal
exacerbate
(v.) to make more violent, intense
exalt
(v.) to glorify, praise
exasperate
(v.) to irritate, irk
excavate
(v.) to dig out of the ground and remove
exculpate
(v.) to free from guilt or blame, exonerate
excursion
(n.) a trip or outing
execrable
(adj.) loathsome, detestable
exhort
(v.) to urge, prod, spur
exigent
(adj.) urgent, critical
exonerate
(v.) to free from guilt or blame, exculpate
exorbitant
(adj.) excessive
expedient
(adj.) advisable, advantageous, serving one’s self-interest
expiate
(v.) to make amends for, atone
expunge
(v.) to obliterate, eradicate
expurgate
(v.) to remove offensive or incorrect parts, usually of a book
extant
(adj.) existing, not destroyed or lost
extol
(v.) to praise, revere
extraneous
(adj.) irrelevant, extra, not necessary
extricate
(v.) to disentangle
exult
(v.) to rejoice
fabricate
(v.) to make up, invent
façade
1. (n.) the wall of a building.) 2. (n.) a deceptive appearance or attitude
facile
1. (adj.) easy, requiring little effort 2. (adj.) superficial, achieved with minimal thought or care, insincere
fallacious
(adj.) incorrect, misleading
fastidious
(adj.) meticulous, demanding, having high and often unattainable standards
fathom
(v.) to understand, comprehend
fatuous
(adj.) silly, foolish
fecund
(adj.) fruitful, fertile
felicitous
1. (adj.) well suited, apt 2. (adj.) delightful, pleasing
feral
(adj.) wild, savage
fervent
(adj.) ardent, passionate
fetid
(adj.) having a foul odor
fetter
(v.) to chain, restrain
fickle
(adj.) shifting in character, inconstant
fidelity
(n.) loyalty, devotion
figurative
(adj.) symbolic
flabbergasted
(adj.) astounded
flaccid
(adj.) limp, not firm or strong
flagrant
(adj.) offensive, egregious
florid
(adj.) flowery, ornate
flout
(v.) to disregard or disobey openly
foil
(v.) to thwart, frustrate, defeat
forage
(v.) to graze, rummage for food
forbearance
(n.) patience, restraint, toleration
forestall
(v.) to prevent, thwart, delay
forlorn
(adj.) lonely, abandoned, hopeless
forsake
(v.) to give up, renounce
fortitude
(n.) strength, guts
fortuitous
(adj.) happening by chance, often lucky or fortunate
forum
(n.) a medium for lecture or discussion
foster
(v.) to stimulate, promote, encourage
fractious
(adj.) troublesome or irritable
fraught
(adj.) (usually used with “with”) filled or accompanied with
frenetic
(adj.) frenzied, hectic, frantic
frivolous
(adj.) of little importance, trifling
frugal
(adj.) thrifty, economical Vocabulary
furtive
(adj.) secretive, sly (Jane’s placement of her drugs in her sock drawer was not as furtive as she thought, as the sock drawer is the first place most parents look.)
garish
(adj.) gaudy, in bad taste
garrulous
(adj.) talkative, wordy
genial
(adj.) friendly, affable
gluttony
(n.) overindulgence in food or drink
goad
(v.) to urge, spur, incite to action
gourmand
(n.) someone fond of eating and drinking
grandiloquence
(n.) lofty, pompous language
grandiose
(adj.) on a magnificent or exaggerated scale
gratuitous
(adj.) uncalled for, unwarranted
gregarious
(adj.) drawn to the company of others, sociable
grievous
(adj.) injurious, hurtful
guile
(n.) deceitful, cunning, sly behavior
hackneyed
(adj.) unoriginal, trite
hallowed
(adj.) revered, consecrated
hapless
(adj.) unlucky
harangue
1. (n.) a ranting speech 2. (v.) to give such a speech
hardy
(adj.) robust, capable of surviving through adverse conditions
harrowing
(adj.) greatly distressing, vexing
haughty
(adj.) disdainfully proud
hedonist
(n.) one who believes pleasure should be the primary pursuit of humans
hegemony
(n.) domination over others
heinous
(adj.) shockingly wicked, repugnant
heterogeneous
(adj.) varied, diverse in character
hiatus
(n.) a break or gap in duration or continuity
hierarchy
(n.) a system with ranked groups, usually according to social, economic, or professional class
hypocrisy
(n.) pretending to believe what one does not
hypothetical
(adj.) supposed or assumed true, but unprovenI
iconoclast
(n.) one who attacks common beliefs or institutions
idiosyncratic
(adj.) peculiar to one person
idolatrous
(adj.) excessively worshipping one object or person
ignominious
(adj.) humiliating, disgracing
illicit
(adj.) forbidden, not permitted
immerse
(v.) to absorb, deeply involve, engross
immutable
(adj.) not changeable
impassive
(adj.) stoic, not susceptible to suffering
impeccable
(adj.) exemplary, flawless
impecunious
(adj.) poor
imperative
1. (adj.) necessary, pressing 2. (n.) a rule, command, or order
imperious
(adj.) commanding, domineering
impertinent
(adj.) rude, insolent
impervious
(adj.) impenetrable, incapable of being affected
impetuous
(adj.) rash
impinge
1. (v.) to impact, affect, make an impression 2. (v.) to encroach, infringe
implacable
(adj.) incapable of being appeased or mitigated
implement
1. (n.) an instrument, utensil, tool 2. (v.) to put into effect, to institute
implicate
(v.) to involve in an incriminating way, incriminate
implicit
(adj.) understood but not outwardly obvious, implied
impregnable
(adj.) resistant to capture or penetration
impudent
(adj.) casually rude, insolent, impertinent
impute
(v.) to ascribe, blame
inane
(adj.) silly and meaningless
inarticulate
(adj.) incapable of expressing oneself clearly through speech
incarnate
1. (adj.) existing in the flesh, embodied 2. (v.) to give human form to
incendiary
1. (n.) a person who agitates 2. (adj.) inflammatory, causing combustion
incessant
(adj.) unending
inchoate
(adj.) unformed or formless, in a beginning stage
incisive
(adj.) clear, sharp, direct
inclination
(n.) a tendency, propensity
incontrovertible
(adj.) indisputable
incorrigible
(adj.) incapable of correction, delinquent
increment
(n.) an enlargement
incumbent
1. (n.) one who holds an office
indefatigable
(adj.) incapable of defeat, failure, decay
indigenous
(adj.) originating in a region
indigent
(adj.) very poor, impoverished
indignation
(n.) anger sparked by something unjust or unfair
indolent
(adj.) lazy
indomitable
(adj.) not capable of being conquered
induce
(v.) to bring about, stimulate
ineffable
(adj.) unspeakable, incapable of being expressed through words
inept
(adj.) not suitable or capable, unqualified
inexorable
(adj.) incapable of being persuaded or placated
inextricable
(adj.) hopelessly tangled or entangled
infamy
(n.) notoriety, extreme ill repute
infusion
(n.) an injection of one substance into another
ingenious
(adj.) clever, resourceful
ingenuous
(adj.) not devious
inhibit
(v.) to prevent, restrain, stop
inimical
(adj.) hostile, enemylike
iniquity
(n.) wickedness or sin
injunction
(n.) an order of official warning
innate
(adj.) inborn, native, inherent
innocuous
(adj.) harmless, inoffensive
innovate
(v.) to do something in an unprecedented way
innuendo
(n.) an insinuation
inoculate
(v.) to introduce a microorganism, serum, or vaccine into an organism in order to increase immunity to illness
inquisitor
(n.) one who inquires, especially in a hostile manner
insatiable
(adj.) incapable of being satisfied
insidious
(adj.) appealing but imperceptibly harmful, seductive
insinuate
(v.) to suggest indirectly or subtly
insipid
(adj.) dull, boring
insipid, like lipid[s], is boring
insolent
(adj.) rude, arrogant, overbearing
instigate
(v.) to urge, goad
insular (adj.) separated and narrow-minded
tight-knit, closed off
insurgent
(n.) one who rebels
integral
(adj.) necessary for completeness
interject
(v.) to insert between other things
interlocutor
(n.) someone who participates in a dialogue or conversation
interminable
(adj.) without possibility of end
intimation
(n.) an indirect suggestion
intractable
(adj.) difficult to manipulate, unmanageable
intransigent
(adj.) refusing to compromise, often on an extreme opinion
intrepid
(adj.) brave in the face of danger
inundate
(v.) to flood with abundance
inure
(v.) to cause someone or something to become accustomed to a situation
invective
(n.) an angry verbal attack
inveterate
(adj.) stubbornly established by habit
inviolable
(adj.) secure from assault
irascible
(adj.) easily angered
iridescent
(adj.) showing rainbow colors
irreverence
(n.) disrespect
irrevocable
(adj.) incapable of being taken back
jubilant
(adj.) extremely joyful, happy
judicious
(adj.) having or exercising sound judgment
juxtaposition
(n.) the act of placing two things next to each other for implicit comparison
knell
(n.) the solemn sound of a bell, often indicating a death
kudos
(n.) praise for an achievement
laceration
(n.) a cut, tear
laconic
(adj.) terse in speech or writing
languid
(adj.) sluggish from fatigue or weakness
larceny
(n.) obtaining another’s property by theft or trickery
largess
(n.) the generous giving of lavish gifts
latent
(adj.) hidden, but capable of being exposed
laudatory
(adj.) expressing admiration or praise
lavish
1. (adj.) given without limits 2. (v.) to give without limits
legerdemain
(n.) deception, slight-of-hand
lenient
(adj.) demonstrating tolerance or gentleness
lethargic
(adj.) in a state of sluggishness or apathy
liability
1. (n.) something for which one is legally responsible, usually involving a disadvantage or risk 2. (n.) a handicap, burden
libertarian
(adj.) advocating principles of liberty and free will
licentious
(adj.) displaying a lack of moral or legal restraints
limpid
(adj.) clear, transparent
linchpin
(n.) something that holds separate parts together
lithe
(adj.) graceful, flexible, supple
litigant
(n.) someone engaged in a lawsuit
lucid
(adj.) clear, easily understandable
luminous
(adj.) brightly shining
lurid
(adj.) ghastly, sensational
maelstrom
(n.) a destructive whirlpool which rapidly sucks in objects
magnanimous
(adj.) noble, generous
malediction
(n.) a curse
malevolent
(adj.) wanting harm to befall others
malleable
(adj.) capable of being shaped or transformed
mandate
(n.) an authoritative command
manifest
1. (adj.) easily understandable, obvious 2. (v.) to show plainly
manifold
(adj.) diverse, varied
maudlin
(adj.) weakly sentimental
maverick
(n.) an independent, nonconformist person
mawkish
(adj.) characterized by sick sentimentality
maxim
(n.) a common saying expressing a principle of conduct
meager
(adj.) deficient in size or quality
medley
(n.) a mixture of differing things
mendacious
(adj.) having a lying, false character
mercurial
(adj.) characterized by rapid change or temperamentality
meritorious
(adj.) worthy of esteem or reward
metamorphosis
(n.) the change of form, shape,
meticulous
(adj.) extremely careful with details
mitigate
(v.) to make less violent, alleviate
moderate
1. (adj.) not extreme 2. (n.) one who expresses moderate opinions
modicum
(n.) a small amount of something
modulate
(v.) to pass from one state to another, especially in music
mollify
(v.) to soften in temper
morass
(n.) a wet swampy bog
mores
(n.) the moral attitudes and fixed customs of a group of people.
morose
(adj.) gloomy or sullen
multifarious
(adj.) having great diversity or variety
mundane
(adj.) concerned with the world rather than with heaven, commonplace
munificence
(n.) generosity in giving
mutable
(adj.) able to change
myriad
(adj.) consisting of a very great number
nadir
(n.) the lowest point of something
nascent
(adj.) in the process of being born or coming into existence
nebulous
(adj.) vaguely defined, cloudy
nefarious
(adj.) heinously villainous
negligent
(adj.) habitually careless, neglectful
neophyte
(n.) someone who is young or inexperienced
nocturnal
(adj.) relating to or occurring during the night
noisome
(adj.) unpleasant, offensive, especially to the sense of smell
nomadic
(adj.) wandering from place to place
nominal
(adj.) trifling, insignificant
nonchalant
(adj.) having a lack of concern, indifference
nondescript
(adj.) lacking a distinctive character
notorious
(adj.) widely and unfavorably known
novice
(n.) a beginner, someone without training or experience
noxious
(adj.) harmful, unwholesome