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97 Cards in this Set

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Cogent
convincing; reasonable.

"Christin'a argument was so cogent that even her opponents had to agree with her
Didactic
intended to instruct

"The tapes were entertaining and didactic because they both amused and instructed children
lucid
easily understood; clear

"Our teacher does a good job because he provides lucid explanations of difficult concepts"
arbiter
a judge who decides a disputed issue

"An aribter weas hired to settle the Major League Baseball strike because the owners and players could no come to an agreement."
exculpate
to free from guilt or blame

"WHen the gold coins discoved in his closest were found to be fake, Dr. Rideau was exulpated and the search for the real thief coninuted."
jurisprudence
the philosophy or science of law

"Judges and lawyers are longtime students of jurisprudence."
pentitent
expressing remorse for one's misdeeds.

" His desire to make amends to the people he had wronged indicated that he was truly penitent
despotic
exercising absolute power;l tyrannical.

"He was a despotic ruler whose every law was enforced with threats of violence or death"
dictatorial
domineering; oppressivley overbearing.

"The coach had a distatorial manner and expected people to do whatever he demanded"
haughty
arrogant; vainly proud

"His haughty manner made it clear that he thought he was better than everyone else.
imperious
arrogantly domineering or overbearing.

"SHe had a very imperious way about her; she was bossy and treated others as if they were beneath her."
cryptic
difficult to comprehend

"The writing on the walls of the crypt was crypotic; none of the scientists understood it."
dilatory
habitually late

"Always waiting until the last moment to do his work, Stephen was a dilatory student"
indolent
lazy

"Mr. Lan said his students were indolent because none of them had done their homework."
insipid
uninteresting; unchallenging

"That insipid movie was so boring and predictabel that I walked out."
listless
lacking energy

"Since she is accustomed to an active lifestyle, Mary feels listless when she has nothign to do
torpor
laziness;inactivity;dullness

"The hot and humid day filled everyone with an activity-halting torpor."
servile
submissive; like a servantq
embellish
to make beautiful by ornamenting; to decorate

"WE embellished the account of our vacation by including descriptions of the many colorful people and places we visited"
florid
describing flowery or elaborate speech

"THe candidate's speech was so florid that although no one could understand what he was talking about, they all agreed that he sounded good saying it."
ornate
elaborately decorated

"The carved wood was so ornate that you could exmine it several times and still noticce thigns you had not seen before
ostentatious
describing a shoy or pretentious display

"Whenever the millionaire gave a party, the eblaborate decorations and enormous amounts of food were always part of her ostentatious display of wealth."
poignant
profoundly moving; touching

"The most poignant part of the movie was when the father finally made peace with his son."
ebullience
intense enthusiasm

"A sense of ebullience swept over the crowd when the matador defeated the bull."
effusive
emotionally unrestrained; gushy

"Gymenth was effusive in her thanks after winning the OScarl she even burst into tears."
egregious
conspicuously bad or offensive

"Forgetting to sterilize surgical tools before an operation would be an egregious error."
frenetic
wildy excited or active

"The pace of the buys office was frenetic Megan never had a moment to catch her breath."
prodigious
enormous

"The shattered vase required a prodigious mount of glue to repair."
replete
abundantly supplied; filled to capacity

"After a successful night of trick-or-treating, Dee's bag was replete with Halloween candy."
auspicious
favorable; promising

"Our trip to the beach had an auspicious start; the rain stopped just as we started the car."
benign
kind and gentle

"Uncle Ben is a benign and friendly man who is always willing to help."
emollient
(adj) Softening and soothing
(n)something that softens or soothes

"His kind words served as an emollient to the pain she had suffered."
mollify
to calm or soothe

"Anna's apology for scaring her brother did not mollify him; he was mad at her all day."
reclamation
the act of making something useful again

"Thanks to the reclamation project, the once unusable land became a productive farm."
spurious
not genuine; false; counterfeit

"The sportscaster made a spurious claim when he said that the San Antonio Spurs were undefeated.
astute
shrewd; clever

"Kelly is financially astute she never falls for the tricks that credit card companies play."
coup
a brilliantly executed plan

"It was a coup when I talked the salesperson into selling me this valuable cuckoo clock for five dollars."
disingenuous
not straightforward; crafy

"Mr. Gelman was rather disingenuous; although he seemed simply to be asking about your health, he was really trying to figure out why you'd been absent."
ruse
a crafty tick

"The offer of a free cruise was merely a ruse to get people to listen to their sales pitch."
Stratagem
a clever trick used to deceive or outwit

"PLanting microphones in the gangster's home was a clever, but illegal, stratagem."
surreptitiously
done by secretive means

"Matt drank the cough syrup surreptitiously because he didn't want anyone to know that he was sick."
wily
cunning

"The wily coyote devised all sorts of clever traps to catch the roadrunner."
ambiguous
open to more than one interpretation

"His eyes were an ambiguous color: Some people thought they were brown and some thought they were green."
ambivalent
simultaneously having opposing feelings; uncertain

"She had ambivalent feelings about her dance class: ON one hand, she enjoyed the exercise, but on the other hand, she thought the choice of dances could be more interesting."
capricious
impulsive and unpredictable

"The referee's capricious behavior angered the players because he was inconsistent in his calls; he would call a foul for minor contact, but ignore elbowing and kicking."
equivocate
to avoid making a definiate statement

"ON critical reading questions, i choose anserts that equivocatel they use words such as could or may that make them hard to disprove.
whimsical
subject to errative behavior; unpredictable

"Egbert rarley behaved as expected; indeed he was a whimsical soul whose every decision was anybody's guess"
tenuous
having little substance or strength; shaky; unsure; weak

"Her grasp oon reality is tenuous at best; she's not even sure what year it is."
assiduous
hard-working

"Spending hours in the hot sun digging out every tiny weed, Sidney tended her garden with assiduous attention."
dogged
stubbornly persevering

"Her first few attempts resulted in failure, but her dogged efforts ultimately ended in success."
intrepid
couageous; fealess

"The intrepid young soldiers scaled the wall and attacked the enemy forces despite being outnumbered fifty to one."
obdurate
subborn; inflexible

"Leanna was so obdurate that she was unwilling to change her way of thinking on even the most minor issues."
obstinate
stubbornly adhering to an opinion or a course of action

"Even though he begged them constantly, Jeremy's parents were obstinate in their refusal to buy him a motorcycle."
incumbent
imposed as a duty; obligatory

"Since you are the host, it is incumbent upon you to see that everyone is having fun."
dogmatic
stubbornly adhering to insufficiently proved beliefs

"Doug was dogmatic in his belief that evercising frequently boosts one's immune system."
innate
possessed at birth; inborn

"Cats have an innate abilikty to see well in the dark; they are born with this skill, and do not need to develop it."
inveterate
long established;deep-rooted; habitual

"Stan has always had trouble telling the truth; in fact, he's an inveterate liar."
tansitory
short-lived or temporary

"The sadness she felt was only transitory; the next day her mood improved."
affable
easy-going; friendly

"WE enjoyed spending time with Mr. Lee because he was such pleasant affable man."
amenable
responsive; agreeable

"Since we had been working hard all day, the group seemed amenable to my suggestion that we all go home early."
facetious
playfully humorous

"Although the teacher pretended to be insulting her favorite students, she was just be factious."
impinge
to hinder; interfere with

"By not allowing the students to publish a newspaper, the school was impinging upon their right to free speech."
dilettante
one with an amateaurish or superficial understanding of a field of knowledge

"YOu can't trust Betsy's opinion because she's just a dilettante who doesn't understand the subleties of the painting."
eclectic
made up of a variety of sources or styles

"Lou's taste in music is eclectic because he listens to everything from rap to polka."
decorous
proper; marked by good taste

"The class wa well-behaved and the substitue was grateful for their decorous conduct."
propriety
appropiatness of behavior

"Anyone who blows his nose on the tablecloth has no sense of propriety."
Staid
unemotional; serious

"Mr. Carver had such a staid demeanor that he stayed calm while everyone else celebrated the team's amazing victory."
stoic
indifferent to pleasure or pain; impassive

"Not one to complain, Jenny was stoic in accepting her punishment."
disparage
to speak of in a slighting way or negatively; to belittle.

"Greg disparaged Wanda's work as being careless and unoriginal."
prejorative
describing words or phrases that belittle or speak negatively of someone

"Teachers should refrain from using such prejorative terms as "numbskull" when dealing with students who need encouragement."
brusque
rudley abrupt

"Mr. Weir was a brusque teacher who didn't take the time to talk to or listen to his students"
caustic
bitingly sarcastic or witty

"She had a cery caustic wit and she seldom told a joke without offending someone."
feral
savage; untamed

"Although Murphy was usually timid, he joined the feral cats who lived in the woods after his owner deserted him."
fractious
quarrelsome; unruly

"Leonard was a fractious child who disagreed with everything and refused to listen."
incorrigible
unable to be reformed

"Sasha is absolutely incorrigible; no matter how many times you punish her, she goes right ahead and misbehaves."
pugnacious
combative; belligerent

"Lorenzo was a pugnacious child who settled his differences by fighting with people."
deleterious
having a harmful effect; injurious

"ALthough it may seem unlikely, taking too many vitamins can actually have a deleterious effect on your health"
enmity
mutual hatred or ill will

"There was a great enmity between the opposing generals, and each one wanted to destroy the other."
malfeasance
misconduct or wrongdoing, especially by a public official.

"the mayor was accused of malfeasance because of his questionable use of public funds."
rancorous
hateful; marked by deep-seated ill will

"They had such a rancorous relationship that no one could believe that they had ever gotten along."
archaic
characteristic of an earlier perioid; old fashioned

"How dost though?" is an arachisc way of saying "how are you?"
hackneyed
worn-out through overuse; trite

"All my mom could ofer in the way of advice were hackneyed old phrases that I'd heard a hundred times before."
austere
without decoratoin; strict

"The gray walls and bare floors provided a very austere setting."
ponderous
extremely dull

"The 700-page book on the anatomy of the flea was so ponderous that i could not read more than one paragraph."
prosaic
unimaginative; dull

"Rebecca made a prosaic mosaic - it consisted of only one tile."
sedentary
not migratory; settled

"Galatea led a sedentary existence; she never even left her home unless she had to."
timorous
timid; fearful about the future

"Tiny Tim was timorous; he was afraid that one day he would be crushe by a giant."
nascent
coming into existence; emerging


If you study Nirvana's first album, you can see their nascent abilities that were brought to maturity on their second recording."
candor
sincerity; openness

"Its refreshing to hear Candice's honest and candor - when asked about her Enlgish teacher, she says, "I can't stand her!"
Conflagaration
a widespread fire

"The protestors burned flags, accidentally staring a fire that developed into a conflagration that raged out of control."
sonorous
producing a deep or full sound

"My father's sonorous snoring keeps me up all night unless I close my door and wear earplugs."
indealize
to consider perfect

"The fans had idealized the new star pitcher; they had such unrealisticaly high expectiations that they were bound to be disappointed."
laudatory
giving praise

"The principal's speech was laudatory when he congratualted the students on their SATS scores."
pragmatic
practical

"Never one for wild and unrealistic schemes, AMy took a pragmatic approach to research."
solvent
able to pay one's depts

"After five years of losing money, the business has finally sovled its finacial problems and become solvent."
venerated
highly respected

Princess Diana was venerated fro her dedication to banning land mines around the world; people today still sing her praises."
paradigm
an example or model

"The current educcation paradigm has students engaged in discovey-based learning, wheeras the older model had teachers lectuiring and sutdents merely taking notes."