Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/25

Click to flip

25 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Alliteration
The repetition of similar sounds, usually consonants, at the beginning of words. “Sweet scented stuff” is an example of alliteration.
Allusion
A reference within a literary work to a historical, literary, or biblical character, place, or event.
Assonance
The repetition of vowel sounds in a sequence of nearby words. “The monster spoke in a low mellow tone” has assonance in its repetition of the “o” sound.
Caricature
A description or characterization that exaggerates or distorts a character’s prominent features, usually for purposes of mockery.
Cliché
A familiar expression that has been used and reused so many times that it’s lost its expressive power.
Epiphany
A sudden, powerful, and often spiritual or life-changing realization that a character experiences in an otherwise ordinary moment.
Foreshadowing
An author’s deliberate use of hints or suggestions to give a preview of events or themes that do not develop until later in the narrative.
Hyperbole
An excessive overstatement or exaggeration of fact.
Idiom
A common expression that has acquired a meaning that differs from its literal meaning, such as “It’s raining cats and dogs” or “That cost me an arm and a leg.”
Imagery
Language that brings to mind sensory impressions.
Irony
Irony usually emphasizes the contrast between the way things are expected to be and the way they actually are.
Metaphor
The comparison of one thing to another that does not use the terms like or as.
Motif
A recurring structure, contrast, idea, or other device that develops a literary work’s major ideas.
Onomatopoeia
The use of words such as pop or hiss where the spoken sound resembles the actual sound.
Oxymoron
The association of two terms that seem to contradict each other, as in the expression “wise fool” or “jumbo shrimp.”
Paradox
A statement that seems contradictory on the surface but often expresses a deeper truth. The comment, “All men destroy the things they love” is a paradox.
Personification
The use of human characteristics to describe animals, things, or ideas.
Pun
A play on words that uses the similarity in sound between two words with distinctly different meanings. For example, the title of the play The Importance of Being Earnest is a pun on the word earnest, which means “serious” or “sober,” and the name “Ernest.”
Rhetorical Question
A question asked not to elicit an actual response but to make an impact or call attention to something.
Sarcasm
A verbal tone in which it is obvious from context that the speaker means the opposite of what he or she says.
Simile
A comparison of two things that uses the words like or as. “Love is like a fire” is a simile.
Symbol
An object, character, figure, place, or color used to represent an abstract idea or concept.
Theme
A fundamental and universal idea explored in a literary work. The struggle to achieve the American Dream is a common theme in twentieth-century American literature.
Thesis
The central argument that an author tries to make in a literary work.
Tone
The author’s or narrator’s attitude toward the story or the subject.