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30 Cards in this Set

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Class Issues, Walters
Class issues

Walters

"Considerations of class are omnipresent in the novel. The novel does not put forth an egalitarian ideology or call for the leveling of all social classes, yet it does criticize an over-emphasis on class. Darcy's inordinate pride is based on his extreme class-consciousness. Yet eventually he sees that factors other than wealth determine who truly belongs in the aristocracy."
Class Issues, Walters
Class Issues

Walters

"The comic formality of Mr. Collins and his obsequious relationship with Lady Catherine serve as a satire class consciousness and social formalities. In the end, the verdict on class differences is moderate."
Class Issues, Kliger
Class issues

Kliger

"It the conclusion of the novel makes it clear that Elizabeth accepts class relationships as valid, it becomes equally clear that Darcy, through Elizabeth's genius for treating all people with respect for their natural dignity, is reminded that institutions are not an end in themselves but are intended to serve the end of human happiness."
Theme, Steinberg
Theme

Steinberg

"The main object of Jane’s satire in the novel is the mercenary and the ignorance of the people, a common criticism of the 18th century. Characters in the novel which best carries these qualities are Mrs. Bennet, a foolish woman who talks too much and is obsess with getting her daughters married; Lydia Bennet, the youngest of the Bennet daughter who is devoted to a life of dancing, fashions, gossips and flirting; and Mr. Williams Collins, the silly and conceited baboon who is completely stupify by Lady Catherine in every aspect of his life that he has forgotten his own morals and duty."
Comic Situations, Steinberg
Comic situations

Steinberg

"Scenes such as Mr. Collins proposal to Elizabeth, and Lady Catherine visits to Lizzy at Longbourn, provides comic relief to the reader while at the same time revealing certain characteristics of the characters."
First line, Steinberg
First Line

Steinberg

"The main subject in the novel is stated in the first sentence of the novel: "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." In this statement, Jane has cleverly done three things: she has declared that the main subject of the novel will be courtship and marriage, she has established the humorous tone of the novel by taking a simple subject to elaborate and to speak intelligently of, and she has prepared the reader for a chase in the novel of either a husband in search of a wife, or a women in pursuit of a husband."
Elizabeth, Steinberg
Elizabeth

Steinberg

"In the figure of Elizabeth, Jane Austen shows passion attempting to find a valid mode of existence in society. Passion and reasons also comes together in the novel to show that they are complementary of marriage."
Elizabeth and Darcy, Steinberg
Elizabeth and Darcy

Steinberg

"In the beginning, Elizabeth and Darcy were distant from each other because of their prejudice. The series of events which they both experienced gave them the opportunity to understand one another and the time to reconcile their feelings for each other. Thus, their mutual understanding is the foundation of their relationship and will lead them to a peaceful and lasting marriage."
Elizabeth and Darcy, Steinberg
Elizabeth and Darcy

Steinberg

"This relationship between Elizabeth and Darcy reveals the importance of getting to know one’s partner before marrying."
Jane and Bingley, Steinberg
Jane and Bingley

Steinberg

"However, unlike Darcy and Elizabeth, there is a flaw in their relationship. The flaw is that both characters are too gullible and too good-hearted to ever act strongly against external forces that may attempt to separate them"
Lydia and Wickham, Steinberg
Lydia and Wickham

Steinberg

"Their marriage was based on appearances, good looks, and youthful vivacity. Once these qualities can no longer be seen by each other, the once strong relationship will slowly fade away. As in the novel, Lydia and Wickham’s marriage gradually disintegrates"
Lydia and Wickham, Steinberg
Lydia and Wickham

Steinberg

"Lydia becomes a regular visitor at her two elder sister’s homes when "her husband was gone to enjoy himself in London or Bath." Through their relationship, Jane Austen shows that hasty marriage based on superficial qualities quickly cools and leads to unhappiness."
The Bennets, Steinberg
The Bennets

Steinberg

"it can be inferred by their conversions that their relationship was similar to that of Lydia and Wickham"
The Bennets, Steinberg
The Bennets

Steinberg

"Mr. Bennet had married a woman he found sexually attractive without realizing she was an unintelligent woman. Mrs. Bennet’s favoritism towards Lydia and her comments on how she was once as energetic as Lydia reveals this similarity. Mr. Bennet’s comment on Wickham being his favorite son-in-law reinforces this parallelism."
The Bennets, Steinberg
The Bennets

Steinberg

"The effect of the relationships was that Mr. Bennet would isolate himself from his family; he found refugee in his library or in mocking his wife. Mr. Bennet’s self-realization at the end of the novel in which he discovers that his lack of attention towards his family had lead his family to develop the way they are, was too late to save his family."
The Bennets, Steinberg
The Bennets

Steinberg

"He is Jane Austen’s example of a weak father. In these two latter relationships, Austen shows that it is necessary to use good judgement to select a spouse, otherwise the two people will lose respect for each other."
Charlotte and Mr. Collins, Steinberg
Charlotte and Mr. Collins

Steinberg

"The marriage between Mr. Collins and Charlotte is based on economics rather than on love or appearance."
Charlotte and Mr. Collins, Steinberg
Charlotte and Mr. Collins

"However, Jane Austen viewed this as a type of prostitution and disapproved of it. In Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen dramatizes this form of women inequality and show that women who submits themselves to this type of marriage will have to suffer in tormenting silence as Charlotte does"
Mr. Collins, Lachapelle
Mr. Collins

Lachapelle

"He believes that his connection to Lady Catherine places him in the upper crust of society; however, this speculation is humorous, as Mr. Collins is simply an ostentatious churchman who will inherit the estate of a middle class family. He is convinced that he is doing Elizabeth a favor by proposing to her."
Mr. Darcy, Lachapelle
Mr. Darcy

Lachapelle

"Fitzwilliam Darcy is an unfortunately shy man who has always been isolated in a dome of high society; therefore, he knows no other way of life other than the life of an aristocrat and expects to be treated as such."
Mr. Darcy, Lachapelle
Mr. Darcy

Lachapelle

"Again, because society has exalted the upper class, Darcy has been brought up to expect his social inferiors to please and serve him, which explains his surprise at Lizzie’s unsubtle refusal."
Class Issues, Lachapelle
Class Issues

Lachapelle

"Jane Austen makes it indisputable that her novel, Pride and Prejudice, satirizes the social class system in England during the late 1700s. By creating characters who place themselves on pedestals according to their class, Austen is able to make light of the often derogatory class consciousness common to Regency England. On the other hand, this British novelist also shows that love and happiness can overcome all class boundaries."
Class Issues, Schaeffer
Class Issues



"social class and behaviors thought to belong to various classes. In many of the characters' interactions and discussions of possible marriage, not just romance and finance but also class is an important issue. Part of Darcy's problem with Elizabeth stems from the difference in their class status, and this is a complex issues, parts of which may become clearer from the following discussion"
Class Issues, Schaeffer
Class Issues



"The next indicator of class has to do with behavior. In a lot of novels from this period, behavior turns out to be the best sign of class: a female protagonist who is consistently polite, modest, upright, and moral generally turns out to be born in the landed classes - even the aristocracy - even if, for most of her story, she's thought to be well-born."
Elizabeth, Poovey
Elizabeth

Poovey

"the fact that Elizabeth can praise Bingley for his compliance when he offers to remain at Netherfield and call that same trait weakness when he stays away."
Elizabeth, Poovey
Elizabeth

Poovey

"the fact that Elizabeth can excuse Wickham for preferring a practical marriage when she will forever blame Charlotte for making the same choice reveals more about Elizabeth's personal investment in these two situations that Jane Austen's views on matrimoney or money. Judgement is always inflected-modulated-by personal desire, Austen suggests, just as vision is always goverened by perspective. 'Principles' are often merely prejudice, and prejudices simply protect one's own interests onto the shifting scene outside so as to defend and reinforce the self."
Elizabeth, Poovey
Elizabeth

Poovey

"Beside the arrogant Miss Bingley, parading around the drawing room in hopes of catching darcy's eye, or Mr. Collins, pompous embodiment of unyielding propriety itself, Elizabeth's impulsiveness, outspokenness, and generosity seem admirable and necessary correctives. When she bursts into Netherfield to see her sick sister, for example, the mud on her skirts becomes completely irrelevant beside the healthiness of her unself-conscious concern for Jane."
Elizabeth, Poovey
Elizabeth

Poovey

"Miss Bingley despises Elizabeth for what she calls 'conceited independence' simply enhances our sympathy for conceit and independence, if these are the traits Elizabeth embodies. And when Elizabeth refuses to be subdued by Lady Catherine, whether on the subject of her music or her marraige, we feel nothing but admiration for her 'impertinence'"
Elizabeth and Darcy, Poovey
Elizabeth and Darcy

Poovey

"Elizabeth's eventual love for Darcy is legitimate because it springs not from the vanity we ordinarily associate with romantic expectation but precisely from the mortification of pride. Yet because Elizabeth only belatedly realizes that she lovesDarcy, her humbling does not entail a rejection of romantic love. Indeed, unaccountable, uncontrollable romantic love continues to play a role in Pride and Prejudice-in Darcy's desire for Elizabeth. This passion, which Austen notes but does not dwell on, is the subtextual force behind much of the action."
Elizabeth and Darcy, Poovey
Elizabeth and Darcy

Poovey

"Darcy and Elizabeth, then, learn complementary lessons: he recognizes that individual feelings outweigh conventional social distinctions; she realizes the nature of society's power. Their marriage purports to unite individual gratification with social responsibility, to overcome the class distinctions that elevated Lady Catherine over the worthy Gardiners, and to make of society one big happy family."