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64 Cards in this Set

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Zwingli born date and place
January 1 1484 Wildhaus, Switzerland
Zwingli’s family
peasant family, father was bailiff so Zwingli interested in government for whole life
Zwingli educated
largely in schools of the humanists and loved languages, literature, music
1506
Zwingli becomes pastor
Zwingli chaplain
accompanied Swiss mercenary soldiers in Italy as chaplain
Zwingli battle experience
saw thousands of Swiss Pikemen slaughtered by French cannon – first modern battle decided by artillery.
Zwingli opposed Swiss mercenary system because of
experience in which he saw thousands of Swiss Pikemen slaughtered by French cannon – first modern battle decided by artillery
Zwingli much effected by
the teaching of Martin Luther.
Zwingli converted to Protestantism
by study, which brought him to the same conclusion about God’s grace as Luther.
Zwingli opposed, with Luther
the sale of indulgences and the Catholic penitential system
1519
Zwingli became the people’s Priest at the Great Minster Church in Zurich. Abandoned liturgical calendar and started preaching through the Bible book by book and challenge unscriptural practices
Zwingli and the plague
when plague struck Zurich in 1519 he stayed to shepherd, became ill, but did not die.
Plague struck Zurich
in 1519
1523
Zwingli published Sixty Seven Articles.
Zwingli published Sixty Seven Articles in
1523
Zwingli’s Sixty Seven Articles were
vigorous expression of the Reformed faith.
City council of Zurich in 1523 supported
Zwingli, at formal disputation between he and a Papal representative
Zwingli’s theology centered upon
his view of the supremacy of scripture and the honor and glory of God.
Zwingli was more regulative than
Luther
Luther was less regulative than
Zwingli
Zwingli disagreed with Luther about
what elements should be contained in a worship service and the meaning of bread and wine in the Lord’s Supper.
Zwingli saw Luther’s consubstantiation view as
a return to ceremonies
Zwingli held to this type of view of the Lord’s Supper
memorial view
Toward the end of his life, Zwingli tried to defend these by picking up the sword for what he saw as God’s purposes
protestant rights in Zurich
Believed that the Rule of God extended over all of life and had no difficulty picking up the sword to fight for what he saw as God’s purposes
Zwingli
Looked for Swiss and foreign alliances to preserve the freedom to preach the gospel in Zurich and elsewhere
Zwingli
Died in battle at age 46
Zwingli
Zwingli died
Died in battle at age 46
Zwingli’s successor was
Heinrich Bullinger, his son-in-law and a pastor in Zurich.
Zwingli’s son-in-law
Heinrich Bullinger, a pastor in Zurich
Heinrich Bullinger
Zwingli’s successor and son-in-law and a pastor in Zurich.
Bullinger and Calvin were able
to reach some consensus on differences which had originally divided Zwingli and the other reformer.
Bullinger had great influence
sent some 12000 + letters throughout Europe.
Sent some 12000 + letters throughout Europe in his lifetime
Bullinger
Able to reach some consensus with Calvin regarding Zwingli’s views
Bullinger
The radical reform movement refers to
a collection of movements which rose out of the push for reform started by Luther and Zwingli, but which sought more or faster change
A collection of movements which sought more or faster change than that accomplished by Luther and Zwingli
the radical reform
Radical reform movement which appeared early in Wittenberg around the same time that Luther was at Wartburg led by
Luther’s colleague A.B. von Carlstadt.
Carlstadt began doing away with
many of the traditions of the church, including vestments and images and adopted a lay interpretation of the priesthood of believers.
Adopted a lay interpretation of the priesthood of believers
Carlstadt
Began doing away with many of the traditions of the church, including vestments and images
Carlstadt
Radical Reform movement that started in Zurich by some of Zwingli’s followers and friends
the Anabaptist movement
Rebaptized adults, claiming that infant baptism was invalid
Anabaptists
Their cries for radical reform included an insistence on the abandoning of all church tradition and use of the bible only, along with a seeking after of a “pure” and “Anti-Constantinian” church without any acceptance of or allegiance to the state
Anabaptists
Sought a “pure” and “Anti-Constantinian” church
Anabaptists
Wanted: no church tradition and use of the bible only
Anabaptists
The Schileitheim Confession was written in
1527
The Schileitheim Confession expressed
many of the distinctives of the Anabaptist’s beliefs.
Many of the distinctives of the Anabaptist’s beliefs were expressed in
the Schileitheim Confession
Menno Simons
a Catholic priest from Munster who left the Roman church to become and Anabaptist pastor in the Netherlands.
Catholic priest from Munster who left the Roman church to become and Anabaptist pastor in the Netherlands
Menno Simons
Menno Simons was a Catholic priest from
Munster
Menno Simons left the Catholic Church to begin preaching as an Anabaptist pastor in
the Netherlands.
Menno Simons stressed
the idea of the community of believers, committed to a new life, sealed by adult baptism, tightly knit, withdrawing from the secular world.
Stressed the idea of the community of believers, committed to a new life, sealed by adult baptism, tightly knit, withdrawing from the secular world
Menno Simons
Returned the Anabaptist movement to its earlier convictions regarding pacifism
Mennonites
Differences between major protestant reformers and the Anabaptist movement
place of church in the world, visible and invisible church, baptism
Had little patience with Luther’s Augustinian theology of election and the bondage of the will and the consequent idea of the invisible church
Anabaptists
Main contributions of Anabaptists to Reformation movement
Sola Scriptura consistency in church polity and worship, separation of church and state, freedom of conscience, holiness of life
Schileitheim Confession
first and most significant confession of Anabaptist faith
Not a comprehensive theological statement but identifies and clarifies the distinctive viewpoints and priorities of the Anabaptists
Schleitheim Confession
Schleitheim Confession year
1527
Confession that is mostly concerned with life and community
Schleitheim Confession
Menno Simons writing which was largely orthodox but didn’t accept the full humanity of Christ
Foundation of Christian Doctrine