Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/104

Click to flip

104 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Abridge
to shorten; to condense
- The editor abridged the book by removing the boring parts.
Abash
to make ashamed; to embarrass
- She felt abashed by her inability to remember his birthday.
Abate
to subside; to reduce
- The pain he had in his leg from his fall eventually abated.
Abdicate
to step down from a position of power or responsibility
- She abdicated her responsibilities as class president after she fell ill.
Aberration
something not typical; a deviation of the standard
- A snowstorm in June is an aberration.
Abhor
to hate very, very much; to detest
- I abhor sushi.
Abject
hopeless; extremely sad; defeated
- She felt abject humiliation after her disasterous presentation.
Abnegate
to deny oneself things; to reject; to renounce
- Some religions practice self-abnegation because they believe it will bring them closer to spriritual purity.
Abortive
unsuccessful
- They were abortive in their attempt to climb Mount Everest.
Abstract
theoretical; impersonal
- He like oysters in the abstract, but when he actually tried one he became nauseated.
Abstruse
hard to understand
- The professor's article was abstruse; most students were not able to make sense of it.
Abysmal
extremely hopeless or wretched; bottomless
- The nation's debt crisis was abysmal; there seemed to be no possible solution.
Accolade
an award; an honor
- The dancers received accolades from both critics and fans.
Accost
to approach and speak to someone aggresively
- He accosted the officer who wrote him a ticket.
Acerbic
sour; severe; like acid in temper, mood, or tone
- The teacher read aloud the acerbic comments on my paper.
Accost
to approach and speak to someone aggresively
- She accosted the officer who wrote her a parking ticket.
Acerbic
sour; severe; like acid in temper, mood, or tone
- The student read the acerbic comments her teacher had written on her paper.
Acquiesce
to comply passively; to accept; to assent; to agree
- The bank teller acquiesced with the bank robber's request for money.
Acrid
harshly pungent; bitter
- The chili we had at the party had an acrid taste.
Acrimonious
full of spite; bitter; nasty
- Their discussion of politics turned acrimonious because of their different views.
Acumen
keenness of judgement; mental sharpness
- Donald Trump has a lot of business acumen.
Adherent
follower; supporter; believer
- The king's adherents threw a party to show how much they liked him.
Admonish
to scold gently; to warn
- The boy's mother admonished him not to go outside without a raincoat.
Adroit
skillfull; clever; shrewd; socially at ease
- He is an adroit salesperson; always winning over the customers.
Adulterate
to contaminate; to make impure
- The cheese was adulterated, after it had been left sitting out too long.
Aesthetic
having to do with artistic beauty; artistic
- The art professor had a highly developed aesthetic sense.
Affable
easy to talk to; friendly
- She was very affable; she could talk to almost anyone.
Affectation
unnatural or artifical behavior; usually intended to impress
- Her English accent is an affectation; she she spent only three months in Europe.
Affinity
sympathy; attraction; kinship; similarity
- Ducks have an affinity for water.
Agnostic
one who believes that the existence of a god can be neither proven or disproven
- His reluctance to affirm or discredit a god's existence reflects his agnosticism.
Agrarian
relating to land; relating to the management or farming of land
- The agrarian interests were opposite those of the urban interests.
Alacrity
cheerful eagerness or readiness to respond
- He headed to his first day of work with great alacrity.
Alloy
a combination of two or more things, usually metals
- Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc.
Allusion
an indirect reference; a hint
- He alluded to a famous line from Hamlet to make his point.
Altruism
selflessness; generosity; devotion to the interests of others
- The foundation depended on the altruism of the wealthy.
Ambiguous
unclear in meaning; confusing; capable of being intrepreted in many ways
- The weather reporter was ambiguous as to what was going to happen with the weather later that day.
Ambivalent
undecided; having opposed feelings simultaneously
- The boss was ambivalent as to whether or not Tom would make a good employee.
Ameliorate
to make better or more tolerable
- The mood of the tenants was ameliorate once their landlord installed air conditioning in thier building.
Amenable
obedient; willing to give in to the wishes of another; agreeable
The girl was amenable to her mother's request to do homework before watching TV.
Amenity
pleasantness; attractive or comfortable feature.
An amenity was sent to the guest from the hotel manager.
Amnesty
an official pardon for a group of people who have violated a law or policy
- They were granted amnesty after they met with the judge to plead their case.
Amoral
lacking a sense of right and wrong; neither good nor bad
- Very young children are amoral.
Amorous
feeling loving, especially in a sexual sense; in love
- The amorous couple made quite a scene at the movie.
Amorphous
shapeless; without a regular or stable shape
- The town was engulfed in the amorphous blob.
Anachronism
something out of place in time or history; an incongruity
- A family doctor who will visit you at home in this day and age seems like an anachronism.
Anecdote
a short account of a humerous or revealing incident
- The old lady kept her grandkids amused with her daily anecodotes.
Anomaly
an aberration; an irregularity; a deviation
- a house without a roof is an anomaly.
Antecedent
someone or something that went before
- My parents and grandparents are my antecedents.
Antipathy
firm dislike; a dislike
- I have quite a bit of antipathy toward my former employer.
Apartheid
the former policy of racial segregation and oppression in the Republic of South Africa
- Under apartheid in South Africa, blacks were kept separate from whites.
Apathy
lack of interest; lack of feeling
- She was apathetic to the club she had once been so involved in.
Aphorism
a brief, often witty saying; a proverb
- She was fond of aphorisms and used them daily in conversation.
Apocryphal
of dubious authenticity; fictious
- The writer's blog was apocryphal.
Apotheosis
elevation to divine status; the perfect example of something
- A hamburger is the apotheosis of the all American meal.
Appreciate
to increase in value
- Their house appreciated year after year.
Approbation
approval; praise
- The crowd expressed their approbation for the band.
Appropriate
to take without permission; to set aside for a particular use
- He appropriated my lunch when I was not looking, taking it for his own.
Arbiter
one who decides; a judge
- She was an arbiter of fashion, always being the first to set the trends.
Arcane
mysterious; known only to a select few
- The rites of the secret cult were arcane.
Archetype
an original model or pattern
- Plato is the archetype of all philosophers.
Ardent
passionate; enthusiastic
-His ardent interest in math made him a great candidate for a future mathmatician.
Arduous
hard; difficult
- Climbing the mountain was arduous.
Aristocratic
of noble birth; snobbish
The prince is a member of the British arisocrats.
Artful
crafty; witty; sly
- The artful teacher was always pulling one over on his students.
Artifice
a clever trick; cunning
- The Trojan Horse was an aritifice designed to get the soldiers inside the wall.
Ascendancy
supremecy; domination
- Personal computers have been in ascendancy for years.
Ascetic
heritlike; praciticing self-denial
- His dorm room was ascetic, with not even a chair to sit on.
Assiduous
hardworking; busy; quite diligent
- The workmen were assiduous, getting the job done quickly.
Assuage
to soothe; to pacify; to ease the pain of; to relieve
- The manager assuaged the customer's anger.
Astute
shrewd; keen in judgement
- She was an astute judge of character.
Attrition
gradual wearing away; weakening, or loss; natural or expected decrease in number or size
- Most workers were lost due to attrition when they retired or moved away.
Augment
to make bigger; to add to; to increase
- She augmented her CD collection, adding five new CDs.
Auspicious
favorable; promising; pointing to a good result
- A clear sky in the morning is an auspicious sign on the day of a picnic.
Austere
unadorned; stern; forbidding; without excess
- Their house is austere; there is nothing in it.
Autocratic
ruling with absolute authority; extremely bossy
- No one likes an autocratic manager.
Autonomous
acting independently
- The West Coast law office was autonomous to its East Coast counterparts.
Avarice
greed; excessive love of riches
- Paris Hilton is avarice.
Avow
to claim; to decalre boldly; to admit
- She avowed that she had never loved him.
Avuncular
like an uncle, especially a nice uncle
- The professor often gave avuncular advice.
Awry
off course; twisted to one side
- The hunter's bullet went awry.
Axiom
a self-evident rule or truth; a widely accepted saying
- "Everything that goes up, must come down" is an axiom.
Banal
unoriginal; ordinary
- A banal name for a store will likely not attract customers.
Bane
poison; torment; cause of harm
- The burn was baneful.
Bastion
stronghold; fortress; fortified place
- The army escaped to their bastion.
Belabor
to go over repeatedly or to an absurd extent
- The boring speaker belabored his point for about an hour.
Beleaguer
to surround; to besiege; to harass
- No one could leave the beleaguer city.
Belie
to give a false impression of; to contradict
- His smile contradicted the grief he was feeling.
Bemused
confused; bewildered
- I was bemused as to where I had parked my car.
Benevolent
generous; kind; doing good deeds
- The old woman was benevolent, always giving to the poor.
Benign
gentle; not harmful; kind; mild
- The protesters were benign, not acting out in any way.
Bequest
something left to someone in a will
- My aunt bequested that I keep her dog.
Bereaved
deprived or left desolate, espcially through death
- The new widow was still bereaved when we saw her.
Beset
to harrass; to surround
- The little town was beset by robberies, but the town could do nothing.
Blatant
unpleasantly or offensivly noisy; glaring
- The neighbors were blatant during their party.
Blight
a disease in plants; anything that injures or destroys
- An early frost proved a blights for the plants.
Blithe
carefree; cheerful
- The blithe birds outside made a lot of noisy in the early morning.
Bourgeois
middle class; boringly conventional
- The city dweller felt life in the suburbs was too bourgeois.
Bovine
cow related; cowlike
- Eating grass is a bovine concern.
Brevity
briefness
- The brevity of the examples in the book was helpful to the reader.
Broach
to open up a subject for discussion, often a delicate matter
- No one knew how to broach the subject that the bride's gown was hideous.
Bucolic
charmingly rural; rustic; countrylike
- The log cabin was very bucolic.
Bureaucracy
a system of government administration consisting of numerous bureaus or offices, with inflexible or inefficient rules
- The DMV is a bureaucracy.
Burgeon
to expand; to flourish
- The burgeoning weeds in the yard, overwhelmed the grass.
Burlesque
a ludicrous, mocking, lewd imitation
- The comedians performed burlesque shows on the stage.