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84 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Cerebral cortex
extensive, wrinkled outer layer of the forebrain; governs higher brain functions such as thinking learning and consciousness
Cerebral cortex
extensive, wrinkled outer layer of the forebrain; governs higher brain functions such as thinking learning and consciousness
medial forebrain bundle
bundle of axons, orgasam part of the brain, the rat would go back to that spot
Medial forebrain bundle (MFB)
bundle of axons that dump dopamean
Electroencephalography (EEG)
non invasive techniques one of the oldest and mos important
EEG use
sleep disorders, sleep apnea, sleep studies, quality of sleep, epilepsy
how MRI works
large magnet aligns all hydrogenines pass thin slivers of radio waves through the brain
brain imaging techniques
CT scans PET scans
Phineas Gage
sent an iron rod through his brain
Traumatic Brain Injury
car accidents, high contact sports, language, emotional control, decision making, attention memory
TBI
destroys all of them a little bit of a time not selective to one brain area
split brain patients
have seizures
corpus callosum
not a bunlde of nerons but a bundle that connects the the brains
split brain patients
will lie if you ask them questions
dominant hand
sign of the brains a symentry
walking
is automated which is why split brain patients can walk
symptoms of split brain patients after about two months leave why
because there are smaller connectors that start to connect themselves
neurons
once dead don't regrow they could but scar tissues prevents it
centeral nervous system
brain and spinal cord
somatic half
nerves that go to muscles that allow you to contract sensory half and motor half to this system
Autonomic half of nervous system
two halves sympathetic fight or flight
parasympathetic stop/rest
sympathetic
creates an automatic response for fight or flight does things to make you more likely to survive
candle light
made eyes dilate which creates arousal
parasympathetic
consume process and store energy digestive system works with sex they work together
what are brains made of
Glia, neurons
neurons
individual cells in the nervous system that receive integrate and transmit information
Glia
cells in the nervous system that provide structural support and insulation, latin for glue, transmission from neuron to neuron, chemical balance
Parts of a neuron
Dendrites, soma, axon, terminal buttons, synapse
Dendrites
receives and integrates
Gene
book definition is weak small bit of DNA that creates one protien we have twenty to 35 thousand so that's close to the different types of proteens we can make
Brain doesn't work
unless neurons are active all the time
neurons are active
due to proteins
Soma
cell body-integrates
Axon
Transmits away from the soma
Terminal Buttons
secrete neurotransmitters
Synapse
junction where information is transmitted to the adjacent cell
Glutamate
know about it activate it
Gaba
know about it inhibit it
equal librium
atoms will equal out
Ions
will move until they equaled
Proteins
huge cluster of molecules
basic rule of chemistry
opposite charges attract
EPSP
Excitatory post synaptic potential
-55mv or mili volts
is thresh hold
action potential
is the signal that goes down the axon
what causes EPSP
sodium rushing in and glutamate receptor has to open up a hole the more glutamate you dump the more glutamate receptors will open holes and you'll get a larger epsp
Gaba binds to Gaba receptor
the gaba receptor opens a hole but not for sodium it's for chloride
chloride
a negative receptor
receptors open this
ion channel
IPSP
inhibitory post synaptic potential
EPSP
the bases of any drug you will ever consume
sarantonan transporter
reuses sarantonan
neuron firing
the bases of every though you will ever have
voltage dated sodium channel
another type of protein that's embedded in the axon
vdsc
won't open until voltage channel reaches -55 when this happens sodium rushes in
axon potential
a series of voltage gated sodium channels opening and closing on the axon
Glutamate
most prevalent excitatory NT in the brain
GABA
most prevalent inhibitory NT in the brain
Acetylcholine
Movemet
Monoamines
regulate many apects of everyday behavior
Dopamine
voluntary movement, pleasure
monoamines
serotonin
sleep/wakefullness, eating, aggressive behavior, depression
monoamines
Norepinephrine
depression. emotion, stress
monoamines
Endorphins
endogenous morphine
Oxytocin
love, social bonding, trust
why do we get an action potential when we hit -55 ml volts
voltage gated sodium channels open
study how the brains works
neuro transmission
Endocrine System
know the ones in the brain and a few in the body
Endocrine Glands
controlled by the nerous system through the hypothalmus
pituitary
master gland releases hormones that cause other glands to release additional hormones
pineal gland
releases metonan and it makes you sleeply
one more
find on slides
brain plasticity
the brain is plastic it can sprout no synapses and can change
brain tissue implants and stem cells
how can we use stem cells
nanotechnology and neuroscience
small engineered devices to help release
Heredity and Behavior
nature and nurture not nature vs nurture
polygenetic
not a single gene but multiple genes
gene
creates a protiene
chromosomes
strands of DNA carrying genetic information
Genotype does not equal
phenotype
phenotype
what you physicaly and mentally are as a person
genotype
is your genes
We inherit dispositions, not destinies
Richard Rose
Genes cannot tell us exactly what a person will be like
laura king