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76 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Define physiological
A psysical state.
Define cognitive
A mental state.
What is psychology?
The study of behaviour and mental processes.
What are the four goals of psychology?
1. Predict
2. Describe
3. Explain
4. Control
What does a basic science deal with?
Research
What did Wundt develop?
1. Structuralism
2. Functionalism
What is Functionalism?
Every action we excert is to survive.
What was Galton fascinated with?
The study of inherited traits.
What did Freud develop?
1. Free Association
2. Psychoanalysis
What did Watson believe?
All behaviour is the result of conditioning.
How can you develop re-enforcement?
Through rewards and punishments.
What are humanists?
People who believe humans react to stimuli, rather than remain passive.
What are behaviourists?
People who concern themselves with the study of observable traits.
What are the gaps between nerve cells?
Synapses
What is the function of receptors?
To collect information.
Define physiological
A psysical state.
Define cognitive
A mental state.
What is psychology?
The study of behaviour and mental processes.
What are the four goals of psychology?
1. Predict
2. Describe
3. Explain
4. Control
What does a basic science deal with?
Research
What did Wundt develop?
1. Structuralism
2. Functionalism
What is Functionalism?
Every action we excert is to survive.
What was Galton fascinated with?
The study of inherited traits.
What did Freud develop?
1. Free Association
2. Psychoanalysis
What did Watson believe?
All behaviour is the result of conditioning.
How can you develop re-enforcement?
Through rewards and punishments.
What are humanists?
People who believe humans react to stimuli, rather than remain passive.
What are behaviourists?
People who concern themselves with the study of observable traits.
What are the gaps between nerve cells?
Synapses
What is the function of receptors?
To collect information.
What are the function of neurotransmitters?
The excite or inhibit the alongside neuron.
What does the somatic nervous system control?
Voluntary movements.
What does the autonomic nervous system control?
Involuntary movements?
What part of the NS prepares the body for emergencies?
The sympathetic nervous system.
What does the parasympathetic nervous system do?
Conserves energy.
How do receptors alert the brain?
The thalamus.
Where is the spinal cord located?
The central nervous system.
What are the three parts of the brain?
1. The hindbrain
2. The medulla
3. The pons
What does the medulla control?
Breathing and other reflexes.
What do the pons control?
Balance, hearing.
What part of the brain controls posture and balance?
The cerebellum.
What part of the brain relays sensory information?
The midbrain.
What alerts the brain of incomming signals?
The reticular activating system.
What part of the brain monitors sleep and emoitions?
The hypothalamus.
Where are the "higher" thinking processes housed?
In the forebrain.
What connects the two hemispheres of the brain?
The corpus collosum.
How can scientists study the brain? (3)
1. Recording
2. Stimulation
3. Leisons
How are hormones carried throughout the body?
The endocrine system.
What is the master gland of the body?
The pituary gland.
What is the reaction to stimuli?
Sensation
What is the organization of sensory information?
Perception
What is the absolute threshold?
The minimum amount of physical energy to produce a sensation.
What is the difference threshold?
The amount of physical energy to dectect a difference.
State Webber's law:
The larger a stimulus, the larger a change will be required to detect a difference.
What is the fusion of the two images our eyes see called?
Binocular fusion.
What is steteopsis due to?
Retinal disparity.
How does sound travel to our brain? (which nerve)
The auditory nerve.
How does the sensation of taste travel to our brain? (which nerve)
The olfactory nerve.
How is the body's sense of balance regulated?
The vestibular system.
What is the sense of movement and body position?
Kinesthesis.
What is developmental psychology?
The study of changes that occur in people as they age.
Name two reflexes a baby has.
1. The Grasping reflex
2. The Rooting reflex
What is internally programmed growth called?
Maturation
What are Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development?
1. Sensorimotor Stage
2. Preoperational Stage
3. Concrete Operational Stage
4. Formal Operational Stage
What are permament learnig process, and when are they learned?
Imprinting, during the critical period.
Name the defense mechanisms.
1. Repression
2. Projection
3. Reaction Formation
4. Regression
5. Displacement
Who developed archetypes?
Jeung
Who developed the inferiority complex?
Adler
What is our drive to suceed called?
Self efficacy
Who developed observational learning?
Bandura
Who devloped conditions of worth?
Rogers
Who developed factor analysis?
Hands Eysenck
What is test reliability?
The test's consistency
How can you test reliability?
1. Test-Retest
2. Inter-Scorer
3. Split Half
What is validity?
The ability for the test, to test what it was intended.
Who developed the first intelligence test?
Binet