Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/26

Click to flip

26 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Hue
dimension of visual experienced by color names and related to the wavelength of light
brightness
amount of light emitted (height of the amplitude)
saturation
vividness or purity of color related to the complexity of the light waves
cornea
transparent part covering the eye
cornea
transparent part covering the eye; bends incoming light rays twoard the lens
lens
focuses the light (bends) to focus on close and far-away objects
iris
controls the amout of light that gets into the eye
pupil
dilates or contracts letting in or out light
retina
neural tissue lining the back of the eyeball's interior, which contains the receptor's for vision
rods
(125 million) visual receptors that respond to dim light; in retina
cones
8 million; visual receptors involved in color vision (in center of retina)
fovea
center of retina
dark adaptation
process by which visual receptors become maximally sensitive to dim light
ganglion cells
neurons in the retina of the eye, which gather info from receptor cells (by way of intermediate bipolar cells) their axons make up the optic nerve
feature-dectectors
cells in the visual cortex that are sensitive to specific features of the environment
opponent-process theory
a theory of color perception that assumes that the visual system treats pair of colors as opposing or antagonistic
Gestalt psychologists
how people find pattern in vision (figure and ground)
proximity
things that are near each other tend to be grouped together
closure
the brain fills in gaps (ie an incomplete triangle)
similarity
things that are the samed seem to be categorized together
continuity
lines or patterns are perceived to be continuing into space
binocular cues
visual cues to depth or distance requiring two eyes
convergence
turning inward of the eyes, which occurs when they focus on a nearby object
retinal disparity
slight difference in lateral separation between two objects as seen by the left eye and the right eye
monocular cues
visual cues to depth or distance requiring two eyes (50+ feet)
perceptual constancy
accurate perception of objects as stable or unchanged despite changes in the sensory patterns they produce