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54 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Def: a behavior pattern that produces either painful symptoms or impairments
• Mental disorder
Def: Inability to organize ideas
• Mental disorder
Def: Inability to think in a logical sequence
• Mental disorder
Def: Compartmentalization of opposite-affect states and failure to integrate positive and negative aspects of self or others,resulting in polarized images of self and others as all good or all bad
• Splitting:
Example: A client on a psychiatric unit tells the nurse that she is the kindest, smartest, most well prepared nurse on the unit. She tells another nurse, who sets limits on the clients behavior ,that she is “stupid and insensitive, and it’s a miracle she ever got an RN license
• Splitting:
Def: Expression of aggression toward others in indirect and nonassertive ways; covert hostility and resentment masked by overt compliance.
• Passive Aggression
Example: A girl who is jealous because her best friend dated a boy she wanted to date agrees to meet her friend for lunch and then arrives an hour late, apologizing profusely and begging forgiveness.
• Passive Aggression
Def: The use of actions versus reflection or true experiencing of feeling to deal with stress and conflict.
• ACTING OUT
Example: A student learns he or she has failed a course, then smashes a window in the classroom, leaves, and drinks six beers.
• ACTING OUT
Def: Gratification of frustrated desires, achievements,and relationships by substituting them with daydreams and imagery.
• FANTASY
Example: an unpopular high schoold senior is left out of social events but spends her spare time imagining herself dressing for and going to the senior prom with the class football hero
• FANTASY
def: a behavior pattern that produces either painful symptoms or impairments
• Mental disorder
def: Inability to organize ideas
• Mental disorder
def:Inability to think in a logical sequence
• Mental disorder
Def: Not merely the absence of mental disorder. Healthy human function depends on a structurally whole and intact human biologic organism with well-orchestrated interactive physiology of multiple biologic systems.
• Mental health:
def:Compartmentalization of opposite-affect states and failure to integrate positive and negative aspects of self or others, resulting in polarized images of self and others as all good or all bad
• Splitting:
Example: A client on a psychiatric unit tells the nurse that she is the kindest, smartest, most well prepared nurse on the unit. She tells another nurse, who sets limits on the clients behavior ,that she is “stupid and insensitive, and it’s a miracle she ever got an RN license
• Splitting:
DEF :Expression of aggression toward others in indirect and nonassertive ways; covert hostility and resentment masked by overt compliance
• Passive Aggression:
Example: A girl who is jealous because her best friend dated a boy she wanted to date agrees to meet her friend for lunch and then arrives an hour late, apologizing profusely and begging forgiveness.
• Passive Aggression:
DEF; The use of actions versus reflection or true experiencing of feeling to deal with stress and conflict.
• ACTING OUT
Example: A student learns he or she has failed a course, then smashes a window in the classroom, leaves, and drinks six beers.
• ACTING OUT
Def: ratification of frustrated desires, achievements,and relationships by substituting them with daydreams and imager
• FANTASY
Gratification of frustrated desiresimagining herself dressing for and going to the senior prom with the class football hero
• Example: an unpopular high schoold senior is left out of social events but spends her spare time
Gratification of frustrated desires, achievements,and relationships by substituting them with daydreams and imagery
• Example: an unpopular high schoold senior is left out of social events but spends her spare time imagining herself dressing for and going to the senior prom with the class football hero
Def: Separation of feelings from thoughts and ideas that are originally associated with them.
• Isolation of affect:
• Example: A woman describes in full detail the traumatic event of watching her friend get hit by a truck and killed but displays no emotion
• Isolation of affect
Def: The active unconscious process of keeping out or ejecting from the consciousness ideas or impulsesthat are unacceptable to the person.
• Repression:
Example: An adult male who was sexually abused as a child has no recollection of the events.
• Repression:
Def: Refusal to perceive or face unpleasant reality as it actually exists
• Denial:
• Example: Nonacceptance of a fatal diagnosis such as AIDS
• Denial:
Def: Use of a contrived, socially acceptable and logical explanation to justify unpleasant material and to keep it out of conscousness
• Rationalization:
Example: A high school graduate who does not get accepted to a prestigious military academy says he could never tolerate the regimentation anyway
• Rationalization:
Def: Attributing one’s own unacceptable motives or characteristics to another person or group.
• Projection:
• Example: A paranoid person uses projection frequently in always seeing the others as hostile, threatening, dangerous
• Projection:
A man who faces a pending divorce engages in lengthy and lofty discourse about divorce statistics and process during a support group but never talks about his own fears and feeling.
• The over use of abstract thinking or generalizations to control or minimize painful feelings
Returning to an earlier level of adaptation
• Regression:
Example: An adolescent who is under stress curls up on his bed with a stuffed teddy bear, sucks his thumb, and does not speak
• Regression
Example: An adult client admitted to the psychiatric unit with diagnosis of psychosis is found smearing feces on the wall
• Regression
Describe the 4 principles involved in developing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship
• The relationship is therapeutic rather than social
Describe the 4 principles involved in developing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship
• The focus remains on the clients needs and problems rather than on the nurse or other issues
Describe the 4 principles involved in developing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship
• The relationship is purposeful and goal directed
Describe the 4 principles involved in developing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship
• The relationship is objective vs subjective in quality
Describe the 4 principles involved in developing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship
• The relationship is time limited vs open ended
• Excitatory
• Primarily involved in Alzheimers disease. Decreased levels of it are thought to produce many of the behavioral manifestations of the disease.
• Acetylcholine:
• Excitatory
• Excessively elevated in schizophrenia
• Digrostriatal control movements
• Dopamine:
• Pts suffering from mood disorders, particularly major depression, may suffer from a deficit or norepinephrine.
• Norepinephrine:
• Role in “fight or flight” response
• Norepinephrine:
• Involved in: maintaining normal body temp., having a normal sleep-rest pattern, eating well, and having normal moods
• Serotonin:
______ mediates cognitive effects, emotions including panic, memory, and anxiety, violence and aggression; sexual function; and sleep wake cycles through the various serotonin pathways
• Serotonin:
Many antianxiety medications such as Valium or Xanax act on the this system, producing a calming action in clients experiencing anxiety.
• Aminobutyric acid (GABA):
Def: The right of the psychiatric client to keep information from people outside the health care team.
• Confidentiality:
Def: Communication between a professional and a client that is confidential and protected from forced disclosure in court unless authorized by the client.
• Privileged communications:
Def: The legal obligation of a mental health professional to warn an intended victim of potential harm from a client with mental illness.
• Duty to Warn:
Def: At the time of admission to a mental health facility, pts are often requested to sign a Release of Information document specifying what information may be released, and for what purpose, to whom it may be released, and over what period of time.
• Release of information: