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134 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
What is sociocultural perspective?
emphasizes the way individuals are influenced by people and social forces
What is family perspective?
disturbance in the patterns of interaction within the family
What is family dynamics?
the interaction among family members?
What are the 4major approaches within the family perspective?
1-intergenerational
2-structural
3-strategic
4-experiential
What is intergenerational?
how our parents influence us and how we treat our kids
What is structural?
parents and children have distinct roles between them
What is strategic?
resolution of family problems
What is experiential?
emphasizes the unconscious and emotional processes of families.
What are the 4 types of treatment therapies?
1-Family
2-Group
3-Milieu
4-multicultural
what are the 3 major components of the multicultural approach
1-awareness
2-knowledge
3-skill
Who developed the classical conditioning?
Ivan Pavlov
What is a unconditioned response?
salivation of the dog
What is an unconditioned stimulus?
food on a plate
What is a conditioned stimulus?
bell ringing
What is a conditioned response?
salivation of the dog
What is the definition of stimulus generalization?
phobias
What is the definition of stimulus discrimination?
being afraid of bridges but only high ones
What is averse conditioning?
-changing behavior towards something else.
Who developed operant conditioning?
Skinner
What is a primary reinforcer?
food,water,etc
What is a secondary reinforcer?
praise,money
What is a positive reinforcer?
motivation
What is a negative reinforcer?
"I'll take away your phone"
What is the definition of shaping?
20$ for an A
10$ for a B
5$ for a C
What is the definition of stimulus generalization?
phobias
What is the definition of stimulus discrimination?
being afraid of bridges but only high ones
What is averse conditioning?
alcoholic taking medication that when he drinks it makes him sick
Who developed operant conditioning?
Skinner
What is a primary reinforcer?
food,water,etc
What is counterconditioning treatment?
train to think that behavior is not harmful
What is systematic desensitization?
training someone to be relaxed as their fear approaches
What is contingency management?
rewarding the client for desired behaviors
What is token economy?
residents earn chips for good behavior in psychiatric facility
What is a neurotransmitter?
a chemical substance in the brain
What are some examples of neurotransmitters?
-acetylcholine (alzeheimer)
-GABA (inhibit movement)
-Serotonin (depression, low)
-dopamine (parkinson)
-norepinephrine (depression,anxiety high level)
-enkephalins (pain recpetors)
What is counterconditioning treatment?
train to think that behavior is not harmful
What is systematic desensitization?
training someone to be relaxed as their fear approaches
What is contingency management?
rewarding the client for desired behaviors
What is token economy?
residents earn chips for good behavior in psychiatric facility
What is an assessment?
evaluation of a person based on psychological, physical social factors
2 types of clinical interviews
1) unstructured
2) structured
What is an unstructured interview?
involves a series of open-ended questions
What are some information sought through unstructured interview?
1) symptoms
2) health status
3) family background
4) life history
5) reason for being in treatment
What is a structured interview?
consists of a standardized series of questions with predetermined wording + order
MSE Appearance + Behaviors
1-hyperactivity
2-psychomotor agitation
3-psychomotor retardation
4-catatonia
5-complusion
What is psychomotor agitation
get angry easily
what is psychomotor retardation
absent of movement
what is catatonia
uncontrolled movement
MSE Content of Thought
ideas the fill a persons head
Examples of abnormality with content of thought
1-obsession
2-delusion
3-overvalued ideas
4-magical thinking
What is affect?
individuals outward expression of emotion
Whats is mood?
individuals personal experience of emotion
What are examples of affect?
1-inappropriate affect
2-overdramatic or exaggerated
3-restricted range (cant show emotion)
what are examples of mood?
1- euthymic (neither happy nor sad)
2-dysphoric (unpleasant feeling)
3-euphoric (cheerful, ecsatic)
MSE Perceptual experiences
ask whether or not they had hallucinatons
what are hallucinations?
perception that an object or stimulus is present when in reality it is not
Examples of hallucinations
1-auditory
2-visual
3-olfactoy (smell things that arent here)
4-somatic (touch)
5-gustatory (taste not there)
MSE Orientation
a persons awareness of:
1-time
2-place
3-identity
an obsession refers to ______ and a compulsion refers to ___
1-thoughts
2-behaviors
the most common kind of hallucations are ______
1-auditory
symptoms involving vocabulary use and style
1-incoherence
2- illogical thinking
3-pressure of speech
MSE Sense of Self
disturbance of the individuals sense of "who i am"
what is depersonalization?
mind/body are not connected
what is identity confusion?
lack of a sense of who one is
MSE Cognitive functioning
develop idea about the clients cognitive strenths and weaknesses
MSE Insight + Judgement
understanding and decision making
What makes a good psychological test?
1-validity
2-reliability
3-standardization
What is reliability?
consistency of test scores
what is validity?
does it test what its suppose to test
What is standardization
1-same questions, environment, etc
who developed the first intelligence test?
-Binet
-rivised as the stanford-binet
Which inteligence scale is now more widely used?
Weschsler
formula for IQ
Mental Age/chronological age X 100
Whats is the self-report clinical investory?
contains standardized questions with fixed response categories
most popular self-report inventory
MMPI MMPI 2
MMPI-2 clinical and validity scale
-depression
-paranoia
-schizophrenia
2 types of Projective tests
1-rorschach (ink blot)
2-TAT
What is behavioral assessment?
persons behavior is recorded for measurement
What some types of behavioral self-report?
-behavioral interviewing
-self monitoring
-target behavior
-behavioral checklist
What is in vivo observation?
observation in life
What is analog observation?
takes place in a setting designed for observing the target behaviors
What are some psychophysiological techs?
1-ECG
2-BP
3-EMG
What are some physiological techs?
1-EEG
2-CT
3-MRI
4-PET
What is neuropsychological assessment?
process of gathering info about a clients brain functions
What is the theoretical perspective?
a way of understanding the causes of human behavior
What is the definition of Id?
the structure of personality that contains sexual and aggressive instincts
Which principle does the Id follow?
the pleasure principle
When does the Id take place?
first year of life
What is the Id all about
its all about being sellfish as a baby
What is the definition of Ego?
The center of conscious awareness in personality
When does the ego take place?
across a 5 yr span
what principle does the ego follow?
reality principle
what is one function of ego?
gives individual the power of judgement and decision-making
What is the definition of superego?
all about moral and values taught by your parents
when does the superego occur?
first 5 years of life
What is the definition of a defense mechanism?
a way of making excuses for their behavior
What is the definition of high adaptive defense mechanism?
healthly response to a stressful situation
What are some examples of high adaptive defense mechanisms?
-humor
-suppression
what are the 6 categories of defense mechanism?
1-high adaptive (humor)
2-mental inhibations (displacement, get mad at someone else not involved)
3-disavowl (denial)
4-image distortion (splitting)
5-projection
6-reaction formation (doing the opposite of what you say)
Oral Stage
-0 to 18 month
-always have something in your mouth
-can be orally passive or aggressive
what is the main source of pleasure for infants
-mouth and lips
Anal Stage
-18month to 3 years
-toliet training begins
what is anal retentive?
person is overcontrolled and strict
What is anal expulsive?
person is sloppy and messy
Phallic Stage
-3 to 5 years
-child becomes sexually attracted to opposite parent
What is the Oedipus Complex?
-mommas boy
-sexually attraction of boys to their mothers
What is Electra Complex?
-daddy's girl
-sexually attraction of girl to their father
Latency Stage
-5 to 12 years
-only stage not sexual
-where you develop friends
Gential Stage
-12 years to adulthood
-develop sexual feeling for friends
What is adult genitality?
the ability to express sexual feeling in a mature way
Who is Carl Jung?
-post-freudian theorist
-idea of archetypes
What are archetypes?
-symbols pasted on down to help guide individuals
What are some examples of archetypes?
-good vs. evil
-the hero
-rebirth
Alfred Adler and Karen Horney
-all about birth order
-close relationship with family and friends are seen as gratifying in themselves
Who is Erik Erikson?
-post-freudian theorist
-believes that as you age your personality goes through 8 stages
Who is Mary Slater Ainsworth?
developed characterizations of infants according to attachment styles.
What are attachment styles?
the way of relating to a caregiver
What is free association?
the clients speaks freely in therapy
What is dream analysis?
where the client relates their dreams to the clincian
What is transferrence?
clincian related events from his life an shares it with their patient
What is the process of "working through"?
when the client is helped to achieve a healthier resolution
What is client's resistance?
holding back within the therapy
people are classified into 1 of 3 romantic attachment styles
1-secure
2-preoccupied (ambivalent)
3-fearful (avoidant)
what is secure attachment style?
find it easier to relate to others in close relationship
what are ambivant attachment style?
ppl seek closeness with others but worry that they will not value them
What are avoidant attachment style?
relationships create conflict b/c of the potential for being hurt
What is the humanistic perspective?
they want you to find the meaning of your problems
What is the person-centered theory?
helps the person reach their highest potential
What does the term client-centered mean?
help ppl strive to be the best the can be
Who is Abraham Maslow?
developed the idea of self-actualization?
What is self-actualization?
the maximum realization of the individuals potential
What is the hierarchy of needs?
describes the orders in which human needs are fulfilled
What is unconditional positive regard?
involves total acceptance of what the client says, does and feels
What is motivational interviewing?
helps the client to explore and resolve their doubt