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45 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Which statement is true with regard to aircraft converging at approximately the same altitude?
(1) A jet airliner has the right of way over all other aircraft

(2) An aircraft towing objects has the right of way over all power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft.

(3) An aeroplane has the right of way over all other aircraft which are converging from the left.

(4) Aeroplanes towing gliders must give way to helicopters.
2
1.02 When two aircraft are converging at approximately the same altitude
(1) both aircraft shall alter heading to the left.

(2) the aircraft on the right shall avoid the other by descending.

(3) the aircraft that has the other on its right shall give way.

(4) the aircraft that has the other on its left shall give way
3
1.03 When two aircraft are converging at approximately the same altitude, which statement applies?
(1) Gliders shall give way to helicopters.

(2) Aeroplanes shall give way to power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft.

(3) Gliders shall give way to aeroplanes.

(4) Power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft shall give way to gliders.
4
1.04 When two aircraft are converging at approximately the same altitude, which statement applies?

(1) Gliders shall give way to helicopters.

(2) Aeroplanes shall give way to helicopters.

(3) Helicopters shall give way to aeroplanes.

(4) Helicopters shall give way to gliders.
4
1.05 When two aircraft are converging at approximately the same altitude, which statement applies?

(1) Gliders shall give way to helicopters.

(2) Aeroplanes shall give way to helicopters.

(3) Helicopters shall give way to aeroplanes.

(4) Gliders shall give way to balloons.
4
1.06 When converging at approximately the same altitude

(1) balloons shall give way to hang gliders.

(2) aeroplanes towing gliders shall give way to balloons.

(3) balloons shall give way to gliders.

(4) balloons shall give way to airships
2
1.07 When two power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft are converging at approximately the same altitude,

(1) the one on the left has the right of way.

(2) both shall alter heading to the left.

(3) the one on the right has the right of way.

(4) the one on the right shall give way by descending.
3
1.08 When two aircraft are approaching head-on or approximately so and there is danger of collision, each pilot shall

(1) decrease airspeed.

(2) increase airspeed.

(3) alter heading to the right.

(4) alter heading to the left.
3
1.09 When overtaking an aircraft at your 12 o'clock position, at your altitude, you should

(1) climb.

(2) descend.

(3) alter heading to the right.

(4) alter heading to the left.
3
1.10 Two aircraft are on approach to land, the aircraft at the higher altitude shall

(1) have the right of way.

(2) overtake the lower aircraft on the left.

(3) give way.

(4) complete a 360° turn to the right.
3
2.0 Visual Signals

2.01 A series of green flashes directed at an aircraft means respectively

in flight
on the ground

(1) cleared to land;
cleared to taxi.

(2) return for landing;
cleared for take-off.

(3) return for landing;
cleared to taxi.

(4) cleared to land;
cleared for take-off.
3
2.02 A steady red light directed at an aircraft means

in flight
on the ground

(1) give way to other aircraft and continue circling;
stop.

(2) give way to other aircraft and continue circling;
taxi clear of landing area in use.

(3) airport unsafe do not land;
taxi clear of landing area in use.

(4) airport unsafe do not land;
stop.
1
2.03 A series of red flashes directed at an aircraft means respectively

in flight
on the ground




(1) airport unsafe, do not land;
taxi clear of landing area in use.

(2) give way to other aircraft and continue circling;
stop.

(3) do not land for time being;
return to starting point on airport.

(4) you are in prohibited area, alter course;
stop.
1
2.04 A steady green light directed at an aircraft means respectively

in flight
on the ground




(1) cleared to land;
cleared to taxi.

(2) return for landing;
cleared to taxi.

(3) return for landing;
cleared for take-off.

(4) cleared to land;
cleared for take-off.
4
2.05 A flashing white light directed at an aircraft on the manoeuvring area of an airport means

(1) stop.

(2) return to starting point on the airport.

(3) cleared to taxi.

(4) taxi clear of landing area in use
2
2.06 Blinking runway lights advises vehicles and pedestrians to

(1) return to the apron.

(2) vacate the runways immediately.

(3) be aware that an emergency is in progress; continue with caution.

(4) be aware that an emergency is in progress; hold your position.
2
2.07 Chrome yellow and black strips painted on pylons or on the roof of a building identifies

(1) an area where explosives are in use.

(2) a fur farm.

(3) an artillery range.

(4) an open pit mine.
2
2.08 Pilots should not overfly reindeer or caribou at an altitude of less than

(1) 2,500 feet AGL.

(2) 2,000 feet AGL.

(3) 1,500 feet AGL.

(4) 1,000 feet AGL.
2
3.01 When making initial contact with a Canadian ATC unit, the pilot of aircraft C-GFLU should transmit the registration as

(1) Lima - Uniform over.

(2) Foxtrot - Lima - Uniform over.

(3) Golf - Foxtrot - Lima - Uniform over.

(4) Charlie - Golf - Foxtrot - Lima - Uniform over.
3
3.02 When making initial contact with a Canadian ATC unit, the pilot of aircraft C-FBSQ should transmit the registration as

(1) FBSQ.

(2) Fox, Baker, Sugar, Queen.

(3) Foxtrot, Bravo, Sierra, Quebec.

(4) Bravo, Sierra, Quebec.
3
3.03 After a Canadian privately registered aircraft has made initial contact with an ATS unit, which items may be omitted from subsequent transmissions? The aircraft type and

(1) any registration letters omitted by ATS in the last communication.

(2) the first two letters of the registration, if initiated by ATS.

(3) the first three letters of the registration.

(4) the phonetic equivalents.
2
3.04 On initial radio contact with an ATS unit the pilot shall transmit the

(1) type of aircraft and last four letters of the registration in phonetics.

(2) last three letters of the registration in phonetics.

(3) whole registration in phonetics.

(4) type of aircraft and the last three letters of the registration in phonetics
1
3.05 ATIS is normally provided

(1) to replace the FSS.

(2) to relieve frequency congestion.

(3) for the rapid updating of weather forecasts.

(4) only when VFR conditions exist at airports.
2
3.06 Where ATIS is available the information which should be included on first contact with ATC is the

(1) phrase "with the numbers".

(2) phrase "ATIS received".

(3) phrase "with the information".

(4) ATIS phonetic identifier.
4
3.07 Whenever practicable, pilots operating VFR en route in uncontrolled airspace should continuously monitor

(1) 126.7 MHz.

(2) 123.2 MHz.

(3) 122.8 MHz.

(4) 122.2 MHz.
1
3.08 En route aircraft should, whenever possible, maintain a listening watch for aircraft in distress on

(1) the receiver mode of the ELT.

(2) 121.5 on the aircraft receiver.

(3) 121.5 during the first 5 minutes of each hour.

(4) the voice frequency of the navigation aid in use.
2
3.09 The specific frequency, distance and altitude within which MF procedures are to be followed are given in the

(1) CFS.

(2) Designated Airspace Handbook.

(3) A.I.P. Canada.

(4) Flight Training Manual
1
3.10 Pilots broadcasting on a MF where no ground station is in operation should direct their transmission to the

(1) aerodrome UNICOM.

(2) closest ATC unit.

(3) aerodrome traffic.

(4) first aircraft heard on the frequency.
3
3.11 Pilots operating in VMC and intending to land at aerodromes where no UNICOM exists, should broadcast their intentions on the ATF of

(1) 121.5 MHz.

(2) 122.2 MHz.

(3) 123.2 MHz.

(4) 126.7 MHz
3
3.12 If a MF is in use, pilots departing VFR shall monitor that frequency until

(1) beyond the specified distance or altitude.

(2) established en route.

(3) established at cruise altitude.

(4) clear of the aerodrome circuit pattern.
1
3.13 A pilot is cleared to taxi to the runway in use without a hold short clearance. To get there, the aircraft must cross two taxiways and one runway. This authorizes the pilot to taxi to

(1) the runway in use, but must hold short.

(2) the runway in use, but further clearance is required to cross each taxiway and runway en route.

(3) position on the runway without further clearance.

(4) the runway in use, but further clearance is required to cross the other runway.
4
3.14 Ground control authorizes " GOLF ALPHA BRAVO CHARLIE TAXI RUNWAY 29 HOLD SHORT OF RUNWAY 04". The pilot should acknowledge this by replying "GOLF ALPHA BRAVO CHARLIE TO

(1) RUNWAY 04".

(2) RUNWAY 29".

(3) HOLD SHORT OF 29".

(4) HOLD SHORT OF 04".
4
3.15 When a clearance for an "immediate take-off" is accepted, the pilot shall

(1) back-track on the runway to use the maximum available length for take-off.

(2) taxi to a full stop in position on the runway and take off without further clearance.

(3) taxi onto the runway and take off in one continuous movement.

(4) complete the pre-take-off check before taxiing onto the runway and taking off.
3
3.16 A pilot flying a heading of 270°, receives the following message from ATC, "Traffic 2 o'clock, 5 miles, eastbound". This information indicates the traffic is

(1) 60° to the left, altitude unknown.

(2) 60° to the right, altitude unknown.

(3) 90° to the right, at same altitude.

(4) 90° to the left, at same altitude.
2
3.17 A pilot receives the following ATC clearance "CLEARED TO LAND, TURN RIGHT AT THE FIRST INTERSECTION". The pilot should

(1) land and attempt to turn off even though the speed is considered too high to safely accomplish the turn.

(2) complete a touch-and-go if it is not possible to safely accomplish the turn.

(3) land and turn off at the nearest intersection possible commensurate with safety.

(4) land and do a 180° turn and taxi back to clear the runway at the required intersection.
3
3.18 The radiotelephone distress signal to indicate grave and/or imminent danger requiring immediate assistance is

(1) MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY.

(2) PAN PAN, PAN PAN, PAN PAN.

(3) SECURITY, SECURITY, SECURITY.

(4) EMERGENCY, EMERGENCY, EMERGENCY.
1
3.19 The radiotelephone urgency signal to indicate a condition concerning the safety of an aircraft, vehicle or of some person on board which does not require immediate assistance is

(1) MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY.

(2) PAN PAN, PAN PAN, PAN PAN.

(3) EMERGENCY, EMERGENCY, EMERGENCY.

(4) URGENCY,URGENCY, URGENCY.
2
3.20 What should be included along with the call sign of the aircraft and time, to indicate cancellation of a distress message?

(1) MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY, ALL STATIONS, DISTRESS TRAFFIC ENDED, OUT.

(2) MAYDAY, ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS, SILENCE FINISHED, OUT.

(3) MAYDAY CANCELLED, MAYDAY CANCELLED, MAYDAY CANCELLED.

(4) ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS, ALL STATIONS, EMERGENCY OVER
2
3.21 A departing flight will normally remain on tower frequency until

(1) the flight is 2,000 feet AGL.

(2) 25 NM from the airport.

(3) 15 NM from the Control Zone.

(4) clear of the Control Zone
4
3.22 You advise ATC that you are on the downwind leg. If there is other traffic in the circuit, ATC will then

(1) inform you of your number in the approach sequence or other appropriate instructions.

(2) inform you of the runway in use, wind and altimeter.

(3) advise you of all other circuit traffic.

(4) clear you to land.
1
3.23 A radio equipped aircraft has been cleared to land at a controlled airport. The pilot should acknowledge the clearance by

(1) replying "Roger".

(2) replying "Wilco".

(3) clicking the microphone button.

(4) transmitting the aircraft call sign.
4
3.24 An initial call to Timmins FSS should be "Timmins

(1) radio this is..."

(2) Flight Service Station this is..."

(3) UNICOM this is..."

(4) this is..."
1
3.25 A responsibility of a flight service specialist is to provide

(1) air traffic control.

(2) flight planning service.

(3) air traffic service in uncontrolled airspace only.

(4) terminal radar service.
2
3.26 NOTAM are

(1) available at all FSS.

(2) mailed to all pilots.

(3) issued for airport facility closures only.

(4) valid for 24 hours.
1
3.27 A new or replacing NOTAM without the term "APRX" is valid

(1) for 48 hours only.

(2) for the day it was issued.

(3) until the time quoted in the NOTAM.

(4) until a cancelling NOTAM is issued.
3