Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key


Play button


Play button




Click to flip

50 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Aberrant (adj)
Given the aberrant nature of the data, we came to doubt the validity of the entire experiment. Abnormal or deviant,
Arable (adj)
The first settlers wrote home glowing reports of the New World, praising its vast acres of arable land ready for the play.Fit for growing crops,
Authentic (adj)
The art expert was able to distinguish the authentic Van Gogh painting from the forged copy.Genuine,
Comprehensive (adj)
This book provides a comprehensive review of verbal skills for the SAT I.Thorough, inclusive,
Curtail (v)
When Elton asked Cher for a date, she said that she was really sorry she couldn’t go out with him, but her dad had ordered her to curtail her social life.Shorten, reduce
Diffuse (adj)
If you pay authors by the word, you tempt them to produce diffuse manuscripts rather than concise ones.Wordy, rambling, spread out,
Dutiful (adj)
The dutiful child grew up to be a conscientious adult, aware of her civic obligations.Respectful, obedient,
Espouse (v)
She was always ready to espouse a worthy cause.Adopt, support
Facilitate (v)
Rest and proper nourishment should facilitate the patient’s recovery.Help bring about, make less difficult,
Hoard (v)
Whenever there are rumors of a food shortage, many people are tempted to hoard food,Stockpile, accumulate for future use
Impartial (adj)
As members of the jury, you must be impartial, showing no favoritism to either party but judging the case on its merits.Not biased, fair,
Incense (v)
Cruelty to defenseless animals incensed Kit.Enrage, infuriate,
Intimidate (v)
I will learn karate and then those big bullies won’t be able to intimidate me any more.Frighten
Justification (n)
The jury found him guilty of the more serious charge because they could see no possible justification for his actions.Good or just reason, defence, excuse,
Magnate (n)
Growing up in Pittsburgh, Annie Dillard was surrounded by the mansions of the great steel and goal magnates who get their mark on that city.Person of prominence or influence.
Novelty (n)
The computer is no longer a novelty around the office. Something new, newness,
Perturb (v)
The thought that electricity might be leaking out of the empty light bulb sockets perturbed by aunt so much that at night she crept about the house screwing fresh bulbs in the vacant spots.Disturb greatly.
Ponderous (adj)
Sol’s humor lacked his light touch; his jokes were always ponderous.Weighty, unwieldy.
Proclivity (n)
Watching the two-year-old voluntarily put away his toys; I was amazed by his proclivity of neatness.Inclination, natural tendency.
Ramble (v)
Listening to the teacher ramble, Judy wondered whether he’d ever get to his point.Wander aimlessly, physically or mentally
Rescind (v)
Because of the public outcry against the new taxes the senator proposed a bill to rescind the unpopular financial measure.Cancel
Sanction (v)
Nothing will convince me to sanction the engagement of my daughter to such a worthless young man.Approve, ratify
Slacken (v)
As they passed the finish line, the runners slackened their pace. Slow up, loosen
Substantiate (v)
These endorsement from satisfied customers substantiate our claim that Barron’s How to Prepare for SAT I is the best SAT-prep book on the market.Establish by evidence, verify, support
Torpor (n)
Throughout the winter, nothing aroused the bear from his torpor: he would not emerge from hibernation until spring.Lethargy, sluggishness, dormancy.
Adverse (adj)
The recession had a highly adverse effect on Father’s investment portfolio: he last so much money that he Could no longer afford the butler and the upstairs maid. Unfavorable or hostile,
Ascetic (adj)
The wealthy, self-indulgent young man felt oddly drawn to the ascetic life led by members of some monastic orders.Practicing self-denial,
Cacophonous (adj)
Do the students in the orchestra enjoy the cacophonous sounds they make when they’re tuning up? I don’t know how they can stand the racket.Discordant, inharmonious,
Confront (v)
All I ask is the chance to confront my accusers face to face. Face, challenge,
Deride (v)
The critics derided his pretentious dialogue and refused to consider his play seriously.Ridicule, make fun of,
Discrepancy (n)
Noticing some discrepancies in his description of the crime, th police began to mistrust the witness’s testimony.Lack of consistency, difference,
Embellish (v)
The costume designer embellished the leading lady’s ball gown with yards and yards of ribbon and lace.Adorn, ornament,
Explicit (adj)
Don’t just hint around that you’re dissatisfied: be explicit about what’s bothering you.Totally clear, definite, outspoken,
Haughtiness (n)
When she realized that Darcy believed himself to good to dance with his inferiors, Elizabeth took great offense at his haughtiness.Pride, arrogance,
Idiosyncrasy (n)
One of Richard Nixon’s little idiosyncrasies was his liking of ketchup on cottage cheese. On of Hannibal Lector’s little idiosyncrasies was his liking of human flesh.Individual trait, usually odd in nature, eccentricity,
Implausible (adj)
Though her alibi seemed implausible, it in fact turned out to be true.Unlikely, unbelievable,
Insolvent (adj)
Although young Lord Widgeon was insolvent, he had no hear of being thrown into debtors’ prison, for he was sure that if his creditors pressed him for payment his wealthy parents would repay what he owed. Bankrupt, unable to repay one’s debts
Irascible (adj)
Miss Minchin’s irascible temper intimidated the younger schoolgirls, who feared she’d burst into a rage at any moment.Irritable, easily angered
Levity (v)
Stop giggling and wriggling around in your seats: such levity is inappropriate in church.Lack of seriousness, lightness,
Miserly (adj)
The miserly old man greedily counted the gold coins he had hoarded over the years.Stingy, mean
Opportunist (n)
Forget about ethics! He’s such an opportunist that he will vote in favor of any deal that will give him a break. Individual who sacrifices principles for expediency by taking advantage of circumstances.
Pivotal (adj)
The new “smart weapons” technology played a pivotal role in the quick resolution of the war with Iraq.Crucial, key, vital,
Precocious (adj)
Listening to the grown-up way the child discussed serious topics, we couldn’t help remarking how precocious she was.Advanced in development,
Proximity (n)
Blind people sometimes develop a compensatory ability to sense the proximity of objects around them.Nearness,
Recluse (n)
Disappointed in love, Miss Emily became a recluse; she shut herself away in her empty mansion and refused to see another living soul.Hermit, loner,
Retiring (adj)
Given Susan’s retiring personality, no one expected her to take up public speaking; surprisingly enough, she became a star of the school debate team.Modest, shy
Sectarian (adj)
Far from being broad-minded, the religious leader was intolerant of new ideas, paying attention only to purely sectarian interests.Relating to a religious faction or sub-group; narrow-minded; limited.
Spendthrift (n)
Easy access to credit encourages people to turn into spendthrifts who shop till they drop.Someone who waste money.
Surreptitious (adj)
Hoping to discover where his mom had hidden the Christmas presents, Timmy took a surreptitious peek into the master bedroom closet.Secret, furtive, sneaky, hidden,
Turbulence (n)
Warned of approaching turbulence in the atmosphere, the pilot told the passengers to fasten their seat bets.State of violent agitation.