• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/13

Click to flip

13 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Acids

(From strongest to weakest)
Perchloric acid HClO4
Hydroiodic acid HI
Hydrobromic acid HBr
Hydrochloric acid HCl
Sulfuric acid H2SO4
Nitric acid HNO3
Hydronium ion H3O+
Bases

(From strongest to weakest)
Potassium hydroxide (KOH)
Barium hydroxide (Ba(OH)2)
Cesium hydroxide (CsOH)
Sodium hydroxide (NaOH)
Strontium hydroxide (Sr(OH)2)
Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2)
Lithium hydroxide (LiOH)
Rubidium hydroxide (RbOH)
Arrhenius acids and bases are:
acid—a substance that increases the concentration of protons (H+) in water

base—a substance that increases the concentration of hydroxide ions in water (OH-)

These definitions are limited to aqueous solutions.
Brønsted and Lowry acids and bases as:
acid—a substance that donates a proton to another substance

base—a substance that accepts a proton

These definitions can also apply to reactions that are not aqueous, so they are more accurate.
Lewis acids and bases are:
acid—a substance that accepts an electron pair

base—a substance that donates an electron pair
hydronium
(H3O+)—H+ riding “piggyback” on a water molecule; water is polar, and the positive charge of the naked proton is greatly attracted to one of the negative electron pairs on adjacent oxygen
monoprotic
describes acids that can donate one H+
diprotic
describes acids that can donate two H+ ions
polyprotic
describes acids that can donate more than one H+ ion
amphiprotic
describes a substance that can act as either an acid or a base. This means it can either lose a proton or gain one. Water is amphiprotic: it can form either a hydroxide ion or a hydronium ion. Other examples of amphiprotic substances are , ,
What kind of salt forms from a strong acid and weak base?
an acidic salt
What kind of salt forms from a strong acid and strong base?
a neutral salt
What kind of salt forms from a weak acid and strong base?
a basic salt