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157 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Four Imagists
Pound
Williams
Lowell
H.D.
Four writers of the Harlem Renaissance
McKay
Toomer
Hughes
Cullen
Four Confessional Poets
Sexton
Plath
Berryman
Snodgrass
"The Road Not Taken"
Frost
about two roads and not being able to choose both; choose the path less taken
"Fire and Ice"
Frost
end of the world; fire and ice are equally destructive
"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"
Frost
stopping in the middle of nowhere to watch snow; horse thinks it's weird; still has a long way to travel
"After Apple-Picking"
Frost
long after apple-picking is done, it absorbs the mind
"Mending Wall"
Frost
about a wall between neighbors that hunters knock over and once a year the neighbors fix
"The Death of the Hired Man"
Frost
Mary, Warren, Silas
Silas ditched Warren and now has come back to die
"Chicago"
Sandburg
gives many names to workers in Chicago; about things workers do; epithets
"Prayers of Steel"
Sandburg
a prayer from steel to God about the many things it could be made into
"Grass"
Sandburg
no matter what happens, grass always grows over it and makes people forget about it
"In a Station of the Metro"
Pound
The apparitoin of these faces in the crowd;/Petals on a wet, black bough.
image of metro train in Paris
"Fan-Piece, for Her Imperial Lord"
Pound
O fan of white silk,/ clear as frost on the grass-blade,/ You also are laid aside.
"The Red Wheelbarrow"
Williams
so much depends/ upon/ a red wheel/ barrow/ glazed with rain/ water/ beside the white/ chickens.
"Heat"
H.D.
nothing can survive severe heat; image of being unbelievably hot
"Wind and Silver"
Lowell
Greatly shining,/ The Autumn moon floats in the thin sky,/ And the fish-ponds shake their backs and flash their/ dragon scales/ As she passes over them.
"The Skaters"
Fletcher
skaters on ice making marks in the ice
"Anecdote of the Jar"
Stevens
a jar on a hill in TN wild gone tame, no bird or bush
"Disillusionment of Ten O'Clock"
Stevens
lots of color mentioned; white nightgowns; tigers in red weather; about dreams
"The Dance"
Williams
vivid descriptions of flabby people dancing about; based on Brughel's painting : Peasant Dance; butts, run-on lines, not dainty people
"Poem"
Williams
cat, closet, flowerpot
"The River-Merchant's Wife: A Letter"
Pound
Li T'ai Po
about a young woman from an arranged marriage who fell in love with her husband and misses him when he is gone
"Poetry"
Moore
she doesnt like it either; descriptions of what poetry can be; interested in genuine poetry; "do not admire wht we dont understand"; poetry should be easily understood; "imaginary gardens with real toads in them"
"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"
Eliot
epigraph from Dante's Inferno
talks about going places
and women talking about Michelangelo; a nervous man not sure of how to talk to women; at a masque
"Janet Waking"
Ransom
Janet wakes and goes to see her chicken, Old Chucky, and sees him die of a bee sting; exaggerated to make funny
"Bells for John Whiteside's Daughter"
Ransom
tom boy who liked to chase geese died; they are at her funeral
"God's World"
Millay
talks about how beautiful the world is
"On Hearing a Symphony of Beethoven"
Millay
loves the music
"Ars Poetica"
MacLeish
"the art of poetry"
talks about what a poem should be; original by Horace; "A poem should not mean/ But be"
"The End of the World"
MacLeish
first talks about a circus then the big tent flies off and everything is dark and silent
"anyone lived in a pretty how town"
Cummings
anyone and noone
phrases mean passage of time
life goes on
"pity this busy monster,manunkind"
Cummings
"The Tropics of New York"
McKay
talks about fruit; sad because it was no more
"November Cotton Flower"
Toomer
cotton; descriptions of random things
"The Negro Speaks of Rivers"
Hughes
talks about many rivers that blacks have been around
"As I Grew Older"
Hughes
talks about his life
"Any Human to Another"
Cullen
talks about friends and arrows men and grief
"From the Dark Tower"
Cullen
many negative words
"Very Like a Whale"
Nash
alludes to many works of literature; metaphor and simile
"Why Boy Came to Lonely Place"
Warren
a journey is talked about
"The Unknown Citizen"
Auden
To JS/07/M/378 This Marble Monument Is Erected by the State
nothing was known of the man; was he happy?
"The Pike"
Roethke
peaceful scene then pike strikes; "A thrashing-up of the whole pool/ The pike strikes"
"Elegy for Jane"
Roethke
My Student, Thrown by a Horse
description of girl; thrown from horse
"Auto Wreck"
Shapiro
describes how awful auto wrecks are
"The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner"
Jarrell
hunched in a small place; killed; remains are washed out bc they are so destroyed; most famous WWII poem; bomber jacket
"In Honor of David Anderson Brooks, My Father"
Brooks
July 20, 1883-November 21, 1959
talks about father's love; shes missing him, but knows that hes not suffering anymore
"The Explorer"
Brooks
frayed hope; tatters; nervous affairs; griefs; choices; a literal one but the human mind is represented
Three Fugitive Poets
Ransom
Warren
Tate
"The Fog"
Sandburg
The fog comes/one little cat feet./ It sits looking/ over harbor and city/ On silent haunches/ and then moves on.
lived in Chicago, Ill.
Sandburg
associated with Chicago School
Sandburg
son of Swedish immigrant
Sandburg
born in Galesburg, Ill.
Sandburg
studied and lectured on Whitman
Sandburg
wrote about common people confidently
Sandburg
The People, Yes
Sandburg
biographer of Lincoln
Sandburg
Abraham Lincoln: The War Years
Sandburg
won Pulitzer for biographies on Lincoln
Sandburg
traveling folk song singer
Sandburg
Chicago Poems
Sandburg
wrote for Chicago's Daily News
Sandburg
The American Songbag
Sandburg
Always the Young Strangers
Sandburg
autobiography
four chief principles: focus on image, use of the language of common speech and always the precise word, creation of new rhythms, and complete freedom and choice of subject; first innovative
movement; came from haikus
Imagism
born in Reading, PA
Stevens
wrote poetry as an undergraduate
Stevens
newspaper reporter in NY
Stevens
joined Hartford Accident & Indemnity Company, became VP
Stevens
Harmonium
Stevens
Collected Poems
Stevens
The Comedian as the Letter C
Stevens
about an imaginary poet
"Le Monode de Mon Ode"
Stevens
"Anecdote of the Prince of Peacocks"
Stevens
"The Emperor of Ice Cream"
Stevens
born in Rutherford, NJ
Williams
pediatrician
Williams
Paterson
Williams
about Paterson, NJ- a manufacturing town
Pictures from Brueghel and Other Poems
Williams
founder of Imagism
Pound
born in Hailey, Idaho
Pound
editor of Eliot's The Waste Land
Pound
Hugh Selwyn Muaberley
Pound
The Cantos
Pound
more than 800 pages; mix of history, political and economical theory, art, philosophy, personal confession, and allusions to foreign language and literature
career ended because of favorability of Mussolini on the radio
Pound
indicted for treason and arrested
Pound
confined without trial in St. Elizabeth's Hospital but released bc of literary community
Pound
lived in Italy
Pound
librarian in NYC
Moore
lived in Brooklyn, NY
Moore
spent time at Bronx Zoo
Moore
liked Baseball, esp the Dodgers
Moore
editor of the Dial
Moore
Collected Poems
Moore
most prominent poet of 20th century
Eliot
gave up US citizenship to become British
Eliot
went to Harvard
Eliot
Prufrock and Other Observations
Eliot
published in The Harvard Advocate
Eliot
The Waste Land
Eliot
Ash Wednesday
Eliot
Four Quartets
Eliot
Murder in the Cathedral
Eliot
The Cocktail Party
Eliot
dramatist
won Nobel Prize for Literature in 1948
Eliot
"Renascence"
Millay
wrote at 19
an awakening to life
won Pulitzer Prize for The Harp-Weaver
Millay
went to Yale for 2 years, but graduated from Harvard
MacLeish
won Pulitzer Prize for Conquistador
MacLeish
was an adviser to FDR
MacLeish
J.B.
MacLeish
modern version of Job, play
Herakles
MacLeish
Three things different about Cummings' poetry
punctuation
capitilization
syntax- use and putting together of words
was a painter
Cummings
E. E. Cummings, E.E. stands for..
Edward Estlin
born in Cambridge, MA
Cummings
father was a Harvard professor
Cummings
volunteered for Amulance Corps. in France
Cummings
unjustly imprisoned for treason in French concentration camp
Cummings
The Enormous Room
Cummings
prose about being in French concentration camp
started the Harlem Renaissance
Johnson
The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man
Johnson
born in Jamaica
McKay
oldest writer of the Harlem Renaissance
McKay
Cane
Toomer
unusual novel
leading writer in the Harlem Renaissance
Hughes
had odd jobs such as working in a DC hotel
Hughes
The Weary Blues
Hughes
known for a series of sketches about Jess B. Semple
Hughes
most influential writer
Hughes
Opportunity
Cullen
known for light, humorous verse
Nash
first poet laureate of US
Warren
poet laureate
a poet whose job is to write about whatever is going on
current poet laureate
Kooser
won Pulitzers for All the Kings Men, Promises, and Now and Then
Warren
All the King's Men
Warren
Promises
Warren
Now and Then
Warren
had red hair
Warren
born in Gutherie KY
Warren
went to Vanderbilt U
Warren
born in England and lived their for 32 years
Auden
W.H. Auden, W. H. stands for...
Wystan Hugh
became an American citizen in 1946
Auden
won Pulitzer for The Age of Anxiety
Auden
The Diner (artwork)
Segal
varsity tennis coach
Roethke
Open House
Roethke
won Pulitzer for The Waking
Roethke
born in Nashville, TN
Jarrell
first African American to win Pulitzer
Brooks
won Pulitzer for Annie Allen
Brooks
A Street in Bronzeville
Brooks
sets most stories in Bronzeville
Brooks
Maud Martha
Brooks