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WHAT ARE THE 5 PROCESS GROUPS
INIATING
PLANNING
EXECUTING
MONITERING AND CONTROLLING
CLOSING
IPEMCnC
DEFINE Initiating
processes necessary for formally authorizing the beginning of a new project

processes for developing the Project Charter

developing the preliminary Project Scope Statement
DEFINE PROJECT CHARTER
project charter is the initial document that describes the project at a high level and formally authorizes the project
DEFINE PLANNING
includes those processes that establish the project scope, create the Project Management Plan, and identify and schedule the project activities.

The majority of activities in the planning group center around developing the supporting documents that comprise the final project management plan.
PLANNING IS iterative

Any scope changes will also likely require one or more planning processes to be revisited. Don't assume that planning is only accomplished once.
framework to gather information to produce a project management plan
DEFINE EXECUTING
The Executing Process Group consists of those processes necessary for completing the work outlined in the Project Management Plan to achieve the project's objectives.
PMBOK, the executing process groups is those processes performed to complete the work defined in the Project Management Plan to accomplish the project’s objectives in the Project Scope Statement.
DEFINE Monitor and Control
project control is all the effective activities that the project manager performs to keep project performance and resource utilization at optimal levels. The magnitude and frequency of these activities are dictated by the size and organizational impact of the project.
For the PMP test, project Monitor and Control entails a total of 12 distinctive processes out of the 44 project management processes in the body of work.
DEFINE CLOSING
Project closing is where you officially end a project phase or the project itself; release all the resources that were assigned to your project, and build reference material for coming projects.
Project processes
Linked by the results they produce—the result or outcome of one becomes an input to another

Overlapping activities, not discrete one-time events

Executed for the project as a whole, and for each phase within the project life cycle

Concerned with describing and organizing the work of the project. Product-oriented processes are concerned with specifying and creating the project product and are defined by the project life cycle
PMI CODE OF PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT
As a PMI Project Management Professional (PMP) I agree to support and adhere to the responsibilities described in the PMI PMP Code of Professional Conduct.
I. Responsibilities to the Profession

A. Compliance with all organizational rules and policies
A. Compliance with all organizational rules and policies

1. Responsibility to provide accurate and truthful representations concerning all information directly or indirectly related to all aspects of the PMI Certification Program, including but not limited to the following examination applications, test item banks, examinations, answer sheets, candidate information and PMI Continuing Certification Requirements Program reporting forms.

2. Upon a reasonable and clear factual basis, responsibility to report possible violations of the PMP Code of Professional Conduct by individuals in the field of project management.

3. Responsibility to cooperate with PMI concerning ethics violations and the collection of related information.

4. Responsibility to disclose to clients, customers, owners or contractors, significant circumstances that could be construed as a conflict of interest or an appearance of impropriety.
I. Responsibilities to the Profession

B. Candidate/Certificant Professional Practice
1. Responsibility to provide accurate, truthful advertising and representations concerning qualifications, experience and performance of services.

2. Responsibility to comply with applicable laws, regulations and ethical standards governing professional practice in the state/province and/or country when interacting with PMI and when providing project management services.

3. Responsibility to act in an honest and ethical manner when interacting with PMI and when providing project management services.

4. Responsibility to maintain and respect the confidentiality of the contents of the PMP credential exam.
I. Responsibilities to the Profession

C. Advancement of the Profession
1. Responsibility to recognize and respect intellectual property developed or owned by others and to other- wise act in an accurate, truthful and complete manner, including all activities related to professional work and research.

2. Responsibility to support and disseminate the PMP Code of Professional Conduct to other PMI certificants
II. Responsibilities to Customers and the Public

A. Qualifications, experience and performance of professional services
1. Responsibility to provide accurate and truthful representations to the public in advertising, public statements and in the preparation of estimates concerning costs, services and expected results.

2. Responsibility to maintain and satisfy the scope and objectives of professional services, unless otherwise directed by the customer.

3. Responsibility to maintain and respect the confidentiality of sensitive information obtained in the course of professional activities or otherwise where a clear obligation exists.
II. Responsibilities to Customers and the Public

B. Conflict of interest situations and other prohibited professional conduct
1. Responsibility to ensure that a conflict of interest does not compromise legitimate interests of a client or customer, or influence/interfere with professional judgments.

2. Responsibility to refrain from offering or accepting inappropriate payments, gifts or other forms of compensation for personal gain, unless in conformity with applicable laws or customs of the country where project management services are being provided.
III. Administration of Code of Conduct
By becoming a PMP, you agree to abide by this Code of Conduct. PMI reserves the right to suspend or revoke the credential of any PMP who is determined to have committed a violation of this Code or otherwise failed to adhere to the tenets of this Code.

Professional Responsibility: As a PMP you are responsible to ensure the integrity of the project, the project management process, the product, the project team and your own personal conduct. Integrity includes such things as; accurately describe the product and the requirements of the product in the scope document, performing quality inspections, ensure that a quality product is produced by following the requirements, monitoring the process, and taking corrective action where needed. Personal integrity means adhering to an ethical code. As a certified Project Management Professional, you are required to adhere to PMI’s Project Management Professional Code of Professional Conduct (see above).
Conflict of Interest
A conflict of interest is a situation in which someone in a position of trust, such as project manager has competing professional or personal interests. Such competing interests can make it difficult to fulfill his or her duties impartially. Even if there is no evidence of improper actions, a conflict of interest can create an appearance of impropriety that can undermine confidence in the ability of that person to act properly in his/her position. Part of your responsibility as a project manager is to report to the stakeholders, customers, or management any actions or circumstances that could be a conflict of interest.
Associations & Conflicts of Interest:
Conflicts of interest also include certain associations or affiliations, for example, a friend you know owns his own IT company and you are the project manager for an IT project that’s just published an RFP. Your friend bids on the project and ends up winning the bid. If you sat on the decision committee and didn’t tell anyone about your association with the winning bidder, that is a conflict of interest. As the PM, if you had influence over the bid decision and your friend benefited from your position, you put your personal interests or the interests of your associations above the project outcome.
The correct thing to do:
In this case the right thing to do would be to inform the project sponsor and the decision committee that your friend intends to bid on the project. You should then refrain from participating on the decision committee. If your friend still wins the bid, appoint someone to administer the contract and make the payments for the work performed by him. Also make certain you document the decisions you make regarding the activities performed by him and keep them with the project files.
Project integration management
Project integration management involves making trade-offs among competing objectives to meet or exceed stakeholder needs and expectations and addresses project plan development, project plan execution, and overall change control.
Its PMI’s view that integration occurs in other areas as well
For example, project scope and product scope need to be integrated; project work needs to be integrated with the other work of the ongoing organization, and deliverables from various technical specialties need integration.
What type of questions
the Project Framework questions address critical project management functions that ensure coordination of the various elements of the project.
What is a “project.”
A project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service, or result.”
In depth a project is 1
By definition, a project is temporary in nature; that means that it has a specific start and finish. A project consists of a well-defined collection of small jobs (tasks) and ordinarily culminates in the creation of an end product or products (deliverables).
In depth a project is 2
There will be a preferred sequence of execution for the project’s tasks (the schedule). A project is a unique, one-time undertaking; it will never again be done exactly the same way, by the same people, and within the same environment.
There are three main characteristics of a project:
1. Temporary Endeavor
A. Opportunity or Market Window
B. Project team seldom outlives project
2. Unique Product, Result or Service
A. Project Product, Service or result is not temporary
B. Uniqueness is an important characteristic
3. Progressive Elaboration
A. Works in steps or increments
B. Coordinated with proper scope and definition
Progressive elaboration
Progressive elaboration means that you keep creating, modifying, and building up the necessary components of your project in an organized way in order to achieve the project's specific outcome/deliverable.
What is the difference between a project and a program
Programs are larger in scope than projects and often comprise several interrelated projects. Also, programs usually last longer than projects and often have a much less definite end point in mind.
Programs and Program Management
Program management is the management of multiple projects all working in unison toward a common cause.
Portfolio and Portfolio Management
Project Portfolio Management is a management process to select the projects that should be invested in. Specifically, it is the selection process based on the need, profitability, and affordability of the proposed projects.
Subprojects
A subproject exists under the parent project, but follows its own schedule to completion. Subprojects may be outsourced, assigned to other project managers, or managed by the parent project manager but with a different project team.
Project Management Office (PMO)
A project management office (PMO) is an organizational unit to centralize and coordinate the management of projects under its domain. A PMO can also be referred to as a “program management office,” “project office,” or “program office.”
STAKEHOLDER MANAGEMENT
recognize the importance of involving stakeholders in the development of the project plan. It is the responsibility of the project manager and the project team to create an environment in which all stakeholders can contribute as appropriate, but recognize that who contributes and the level of the contribution will vary by stakeholder. There are usually a number of people who are either directly involved in a project or who have a stake in its outcome.
key stakeholders
Project Manager —the project manager, also known as the project leader, is the head of the project.
Customer — this is the person or group that will accept the final deliverable(s) that the project produces. The final deliverable is the final output and it is delivered to the project customer, whose needs and requirements are what drive the project.
Host Organization -
Project Team —Project team members produce the outputs, called deliverables, for the project. They also participate in the project management process
Sponsor —the sponsor is the management person who acts as a liaison between the management team and the project leader.
Influencers
PMO -
NB
Exam Note: Projects should support and add value to the host organization and its purpose.

Exam Note: Know that projects follow the culture and practices of the organization hosting the project.
NB
PMI® is looking at the importance of making sure all the stakeholders are identified and that their roles in the process are identified as well.
PROJECT ENVIRONMENT
the PM is a steward of PMI’s precious resources and ambassadors for the project management profession. The PM should proudly hold themselves accountable to the highest standards of ethics and professionalism.
What could impact the project
Physical, Cultural and Social Environmental impacts that projects have on Countries, States, Regions, and Communities and most importantly People.
PROJECT ENVIRONMENT
8 background areas
Economic,
Demographic,
Educational,
Ethical,
Ethnic,
Religious, and where physical environment is concerned, Local Ecology and Physical Geography
Project Managers also need to be familiar with applicable laws
Project Managers also need to be familiar with applicable laws
International factors
Time-Zone differences , National and Regional Holidays, Travel requirements and Logistics .
NB
Virtually all projects that are planned and implemented have impacts both positive and negative, which can be intended and unintended.
Project managers must recognize the role of the project as a component within an organization.
Organizations are categorized into one of five models:
Functional
This traditional structure groups people by specialization (for example, marketing, contracting, accounting, and so on). The project manager has no formal authority over project resources and must rely on the informal power structure and his or her own interpersonal skills to obtain resource commitments from functional managers. Conflicts tend to develop over the relative priorities of various projects competing for limited resources.
Weak Matrix
The matrix organization maintains vertical functional lines of authority while establishing a relatively permanent horizontal structure containing the managers for various projects. The project managers interact with all functional units supporting their projects. In a weak matrix, the balance of power leans toward the functional manager rather than the project manager. That is, workers’ administrative relationships, physical proximity, and relative time expenditures favor the functional manager.
Balanced Matrix
A balanced matrix structure has many of the same attributes as a weak matrix, but the project manager has more time and power regarding the project. A balanced matrix still has time accountability issues for all the project team members since their functional managers will want reports on their time within the project. In a balanced matrix the project manager has a full-time role as a project manager with a reasonable level of authority and has a primarily part-time project team
Strong Matrix
The strong matrix is the same as the weak matrix except that the balance of power favors the project manager rather than the functional manager. The project manager has medium to high formal authority.
Projectized
In a projectized organization, a separate, vertical structure is established for each project. Personnel are assigned to particular projects on a full-time basis. The project manager has total authority over the project, subject only to the time, cost, and performance constraints specified in the project targets
These are the functional organizations; project expeditor
which is little more than a functionary who helps support the concept of project management but not really the practice;
NB
Exam Note: Projects should support and add value to the host organization and its purpose.

Exam Note: Know that projects follow the culture and practices of the organization hosting the project.
NB
PMI® is looking at the importance of making sure all the stakeholders are identified and that their roles in the process are identified as well.
PROJECT ENVIRONMENT
the PM is a steward of PMI’s precious resources and ambassadors for the project management profession. The PM should proudly hold themselves accountable to the highest standards of ethics and professionalism.
What could impact the project
Physical, Cultural and Social Environmental impacts that projects have on Countries, States, Regions, and Communities and most importantly People.
PROJECT ENVIRONMENT
8 background areas
Economic,
Demographic,
Educational,
Ethical,
Ethnic,
Religious, and where physical environment is concerned, Local Ecology and Physical Geography
Project Managers also need to be familiar with applicable laws
Project Managers also need to be familiar with applicable laws
International factors
Time-Zone differences , National and Regional Holidays, Travel requirements and Logistics .
NB
Virtually all projects that are planned and implemented have impacts both positive and negative, which can be intended and unintended.
Project managers must recognize the role of the project as a component within an organization.
Organizations are categorized into one of five models:
Functional
This traditional structure groups people by specialization (for example, marketing, contracting, accounting, and so on). The project manager has no formal authority over project resources and must rely on the informal power structure and his or her own interpersonal skills to obtain resource commitments from functional managers. Conflicts tend to develop over the relative priorities of various projects competing for limited resources.
Weak Matrix
The matrix organization maintains vertical functional lines of authority while establishing a relatively permanent horizontal structure containing the managers for various projects. The project managers interact with all functional units supporting their projects. In a weak matrix, the balance of power leans toward the functional manager rather than the project manager. That is, workers’ administrative relationships, physical proximity, and relative time expenditures favor the functional manager.
Balanced Matrix
A balanced matrix structure has many of the same attributes as a weak matrix, but the project manager has more time and power regarding the project. A balanced matrix still has time accountability issues for all the project team members since their functional managers will want reports on their time within the project. In a balanced matrix the project manager has a full-time role as a project manager with a reasonable level of authority and has a primarily part-time project team
Strong Matrix
The strong matrix is the same as the weak matrix except that the balance of power favors the project manager rather than the functional manager. The project manager has medium to high formal authority.
Projectized
In a projectized organization, a separate, vertical structure is established for each project. Personnel are assigned to particular projects on a full-time basis. The project manager has total authority over the project, subject only to the time, cost, and performance constraints specified in the project targets
These are the functional organizations; project expeditor
which is little more than a functionary who helps support the concept of project management but not really the practice;
How does it start
first there is a need
they decide to find an approp resonse
this is the start of the project
What are the major deliv?
Is it feasable?
Should we do it?
When does the stakeholder have greatest influence?
during the Initiation Project Stakeholder influence is greatest at the beginning of a project and decreases over time.
When are risk and uncertainty at their greatest
During Initiation of a Project, risk and uncertainty at their greatest because the Project is most susceptible to change early on. Failure is more likely to happen in this phase than any other.
Planning Phase, where the project solution is further developed
detailed as possible
Intermediate work products (interim deliverables) are IDd with strategy for producing them
How is this planning stragety formumlated
definition of the required elements of work (tasks)
optimum sequence for executing them (the schedule)
Estim made on time / cost
Before final approval what is considerd again
The question of feasibility and justification surfaces again
During execution what is the PM doing?
he prescribed work is performed under the watchful eye of the project manager. Progress is continuously monitored (Monitor and Control Phase, fourth phase) and appropriate adjustments are made and recorded as variances from the original plan.
What is the team doing?
the project team remains focused on meeting the objectives developed and agreed upon at the outset of the project.
What is the point of close out phase
Did project satisfied or will satisfy the original need?
Ideally, the project culminates with a smooth transition from deliverable creation (the project) to deliverable utilization (the post-project life cycle).
What does the customer do here?
The project customer accepts and uses the deliverables.
What happens to resources during closing?
project resources (the members of the project team) are gradually re-deployed and the project finally shuts down.
Think Vinnie
Though project is over - there is value in his knowledge - there is also value in our knowledge
Project phases comprise the project life cycle. The project lifecycle corresponds to the project management framework and provides several benefits:
Each phase results in some type of deliverable.
Phase completion shows accomplishment and progression.
Phase completion allows time for review to determine if the project should move forward.
Phases allow the project to be progressively elaborated.
Why use phases?
The point of segmenting projects into phases is to allow for smaller, manageable sections, and to provide deliverables in support of the ongoing operations.
When does staffing cost reach its peak?
Cost of staffing a project generally reaches the peak ¾ of the way to completion and then tethers off
What are constraints
Constraints are factors that may limit the project management team’s options,
What are assumptions
assumptions are factors that for planning purposes may be considered to be true, real, or certain
What is triple constraint
project scope, time and cost

The Triple Constraint is a project management principle that requires the balancing of three competing priorities - scope/quality, schedule/time and cost/resources - so that when a change is made to one; there must be a review of the other two priorities to determine if there is a potential impact.
What is is affected by balancing the triple constraint
Project quality

High quality projects deliver the required product, service or result within the scope, on time and within budget.
PMBOK organizes 44 project management processes from the Project Management Process Groups into What?
nine Knowledge Areas.They are?
Project Integration Management
focus is on managing all of the moving parts of a project
Project Scope Management
focus is on protecting, fulfilling, and delivering.
Project Time Management :
focus is on scheduling activities, monitoring the project schedule, and working with the project team and stakeholders to ensure the project completes on time.
Project Cost Management :
focus is on estimating and maintaining project costs.
Project Quality Management :
focus is on setting the quality expectations and then delivering the project product with the expected level of quality.
Project Human Resources Management :
focus in on developing the project team to work together to deliver the project as expected.
Project Communications Management :
focus is on delivering needed information to the correct parties, at the correct time.
. Project Risk Management :
focus is on identifying, mitigating, and managing project risks.
Project Procurement Management :
focus is soliciting, selecting, and managing vendors to complete project work or supply project materials.
NOTE - EACH PROJECT AREA IS BROKEN IN TO WHAT
PROCESSES