Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/35

Click to flip

35 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
side·track
v. tr.
To divert from a main issue or course: I was sidetracked from my work by an unexpected visitor.
To delay or block the progress of deliberately: “a bill that would sidetrack food irradiation in this country” (Alexis Beck).
To switch from a main railroad track to a siding.

v. intr.
To deviate from a main issue or course.
To run into a siding.
incredulity
n. The state or quality of being incredulous; disbelief.
allure
v. tr.
To attract with something desirable; entice: Promises of quick profits allure the unwary investor.
v. intr.
To be highly, often subtly attractive: charms that still allure.
n.
The power to attract; enticement.
wretch
n.
A miserable, unfortunate, or unhappy person.
A person regarded as base, mean, or despicable: “a stony adversary, an inhuman wretch” (Shakespeare
grimace
n.
A sharp contortion of the face expressive of pain, contempt, or disgust.
beckon
To signal or summon, as by nodding or waving.
To attract because of an inviting or enticing appearance: “a lovely, sunny country that seemed to beckon them on to the Emerald City” (L. Frank Baum).
fatuous
adj.
Vacuously, smugly, and unconsciously foolish. See Synonyms at foolish.
Delusive; unreal: fatuous hopes.
specious
adj.
Having the ring of truth or plausibility but actually fallacious: a specious argument.
Deceptively attractive.
mortify
v. tr.
To cause to experience shame, humiliation, or wounded pride; humiliate.
To discipline (one's body and physical appetites) by self-denial or self-inflicted privation.

v. intr.
To practice ascetic discipline or self-denial of the body and its appetites.
Pathology. To undergo mortification; become gangrenous or necrosed
gallantry
Nobility of spirit or action; courage.
Chivalrous attention toward women; courtliness: “the air of faintly mocking gallantry with which he habitually treated mother” (Louis Auchincloss).
The act or an instance of gallant speech or behavior.
sob
To weep aloud with convulsive gasping; cry uncontrollably. See Synonyms at cry.
To make a sound resembling that of loud weeping.
exclamation
n.
An abrupt, forceful utterance: an exclamation of delight.
An outcry, as of protest.
Grammar. An interjection.
Sphinx
n.
Mythology. A figure in Egyptian myth having the body of a lion and the head of a man, ram, or hawk.
often Sphinx Greek Mythology. A winged creature having the head of a woman and the body of a lion, noted for killing those who could not answer its riddle.
A puzzling or mysterious person.
waist
n. n.

The part of the human trunk between the bottom of the rib cage and the pelvis.
The narrow part of the abdomen of an insect.
stupor
n.
A state of reduced or suspended sensibility.
A state of mental numbness, as that resulting from shock; a daze. See Synonyms at lethargy.
parlor
n.
A room in a private home set apart for the entertainment of visitors.
A small lounge or sitting room affording limited privacy, as at an inn or tavern.
A room equipped and furnished for a special function or business: a tanning parlor
floral
adj.
Of, relating to, or suggestive of a flower: a fabric with a floral pattern
rascal
n.
One that is playfully mischievous.
An unscrupulous, dishonest person; a scoundrel.

adj. Archaic
Made up of, belonging to, or relating to the common people: “Nor shall the Rascal Rabble here have Peace” (John Dryden).
trifle
n.
Something of little importance or value.
A small amount; a jot.

v.intr. To deal with something as if it were of little significance or value.
To act, perform, or speak with little seriousness or purpose; jest.
To play or toy with something: Don't trifle with my affections. See Synonyms at flirt.
v.tr
to waste (time or money, for example)
vainglorious
adj.
Characterized by or exhibiting excessive vanity; boastful.
Proceeding from vainglory.
perfidy
n. pl. per·fi·dies
Deliberate breach of faith; calculated violation of trust; treachery: “the fink, whose perfidy was equaled only by his gall” (Gilbert Millstein).
The act or an instance of treachery.
mend
v. tr.
To make repairs or restoration to; fix.
To reform or correct: mend one's ways.
tantalize
tr.v. tan·ta·lized, tan·ta·liz·ing, tan·ta·liz·es
To excite (another) by exposing something desirable while keeping it out of reach.
liaison
n.

An instance or a means of communication between different groups or units of an organization, especially in the armed forces.
One that maintains communication: served as the President's liaison with Congress.

A close relationship, connection, or link.
An adulterous relationship; an affair.
Linguistics. Pronunciation of the usually silent final consonant of a word when followed by a word beginning with a vowel, especially in French.
incubus
n. pl. in·cu·bus·es or in·cu·bi (-b)
An evil spirit supposed to descend upon and have sexual intercourse with women as they sleep.
A nightmare.
An oppressive or nightmarish burden
knickers
pl.n.

Long bloomers formerly worn as underwear by women and girls.
Chiefly British. Panties.
Full breeches gathered and banded just below the knee.
plait
n.
A braid, especially of hair.
A pleat.
forlorn
adj.

Appearing sad or lonely because deserted or abandoned.
Forsaken or deprived: forlorn of all hope.
Wretched or pitiful in appearance or condition: forlorn roadside shacks.
Nearly hopeless; desperate. See Synonyms at despondent.
in·gé·nue also in·ge·nue
n.
A naive, innocent girl or young woman.

The role of an ingénue in a dramatic production.
An actress playing such a role.
blush
intr.v. blushed, blush·ing, blush·es
To become red in the face, especially from modesty, embarrassment, or shame; flush.
To become red or rosy.
To feel embarrassed or ashamed: blushed at his own audacity.
n. + A red or rosy color: the blush of dawn.
A glance, look, or view: thought the painting genuine at first blush.
anguish
n.
Agonizing physical or mental pain; torment. See Synonyms at regret.

v. an·guished, an·guish·ing, an·guish·es
v. tr.
To cause to feel or suffer anguish.

v. intr.
To feel or suffer anguish.
invective
n.
Denunciatory or abusive language; vituperation.
Denunciatory or abusive expression or discourse.

adj.
Of, relating to, or characterized by denunciatory or abusive language.
supercilious
adj.
Feeling or showing haughty disdain. See Synonyms at proud.
impudent
adj.
Characterized by offensive boldness; insolent or impertinent. See Synonyms at shameless.
timid
adj. tim·id·er, tim·id·est
Lacking self-confidence; shy.
Fearful and hesitant: problems that call for bold, not timid, responses