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20 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
A weakened misrepresentation of an opponent's view
straw man
reducing possibilities to only two
bifurcation
the use of the claim as its own justification
begging the question
the prediction of catastrophe based on a series of links started by one particular act
slippery slope
sidetracks the issue by attacking the person
abusive ad hominem
attemps to discredit an argument based on a person's hypocrisy
tu quo que
calls someone a name that implies a quality or fact that is not proved
question-begging epithet
turns a coincidence or a correlation into a cause
false cause
concludes too much from to little
hasty generalization
missapplies a true principle to a situation that is exceptional
sweeping generalization
assumes that what is true of an individual in a large group must be true of the entire group
composition
assumes that what is true of the group as a whole must be true fo each member
division
changes the meaning of a word or phrase in a mid-discussion
equivocation
asks a question that assumes and so corners its respondent
complex question
manipulates agreement by way of fear instead of cogent reason
appeal to fear
manipulates agreement by way of pity instead of cogent reason
appeal to pity
convinces by arguing an idea's popularity
band wagon
syntax of the sentence confuses the meaning of the sentence
amphibole
colors the language according to the arguers' perspective
special pleading
uses bad reputations to discredit
guilt by association