• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/26

Click to flip

26 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
what is the leading cause of death worldwide?
cardiac failure/MI
what is the weight of a normal heart?
- men ~ 350 g
- women ~250 g
what the most common cause of ischemic heart disease?
coronary atherosclerosis
what is the number 1 cause of death in people over the age of 35?
coronary atherosclerosis
describe the progression of the heart's rhythm during sudden death due to MI? how long does this take to occur?
- arrhythmia leads to tachycardia which leads to fibrillation
- this can occur in 15 - 30 seconds
how would a patient with fibrillations describe them feeling?
like a bag of worms
what is the most common place for a person to have a lethal obstruction?
left anterior descending coronary artery (the widow maker)
why are acute plaque changes worse than progressive plaque changes?
the heart does not have time to compensate for acute plaque changes like it does with progressive plaque changes
what are the 3 most common places for things such as atheromas to be deposited?
- proximal left anterior descending artery (the widow maker)
- mid right coronary artery (deadman's curve)
- proximal left circumflex artery
T or F: ischemia results in reversible cell damage while infarction results in irreversible cell damage.
true
a 48 year old obese male comes in to your office complaining of chest pain only when he tries to push mow his lawn. he tells you that when he rests for a little bit his chest pain goes away. what is the most likely diagnosis?
stable angina
a 55 year old male with a history of high cholesterol and high LDL comes into your office complaining of chest pain all the time. what is the most likely diagnosis?
unstable angina
approximately how occluded does an artery need to be to cause stable angina? approximately how occluded does an artery need to be to cause unstable angina?
- ~75% occlusion
- > 75% occlusion
what is the golden time to get someone treatment for myocardial ischemia/infarction?
20-40 minutes. in this time interval irreversible necrosis occurs and we want to get them treatment to prevent as much necrosis and myocardium loss as possible
what changes will you see in an MI after 1 hour?
- pale tissue
- may or may not see contractions
what changes will you see in a MI after 24 hours?
- hemorrhage
- palor
- neutrophils
what changes will you see in a MI after 3-5 days?
- soft, white tissue
- lymphocytes and macrophages
what changes will you see in a MI after 10 days?
- gelatinous, grey tissue
- collagen
what changes will you see in a MI after 3-4 months?
- hard, white scar tissue
- collagen
- very few lymphocytes
what is the most common site of an infarct? what artery is occluded?
- left ventricle
- most commonly LAD
what occurs first: a subendocardial infarct or a transmural infarct? why?
- subendocardial
- because this is the tissue that is furthest away from the arteries that are providing the blood
what parts of the heart are affected during a LAD occlusion?
- anterior wall of the LV
- anterior septum
- apex
what parts of the heart are affected during a right coronary artery occlusion?
- posterior wall of the left ventricle
- posterior septum
- right ventricular free wall
what parts of the heart are affected during a left circumflex artery occlusion?
lateral left ventricle free wall
how long after a MI will a myocardial rupture occur if it is going to occur?
4 - 10 days
which is more likely to cause mitral valve failure? anterior or posterior infarct? why does this occur?
- posterior
- the posterior papillary muscle has a single blood supply and is more prone to rupture