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22 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What are the four Hypersensitivity reactions?
Type I
Type II
Type III
Type IV
Type I Hypersensitivity is also known as what?
Anaphalactic
Type II Hypersensitivity is also known as what?
Cytotoxic
Type III Hypersensitivity is also known as what?
Immune Complex Disease
Type IV Hypersensitivity is also known as what?
Cell Mediated or Delayed Hypersensitivity
Type I Hypersensitivity is associated with what disorders?
Bronchial Asthma
Type I Hypersensitivity uses what immune mechanisms?
IgE
Basophils
Mast Cells
Type II Hypersensitivity is associated with what disorders?
Goodpasteur's Disease
Erythroblastosis Fetalis
Pernicious Anemia
Transfusion Reactions
Hashimotos Thyroiditis
Type II Hypersensitivity uses what immune mechanisms?
Target cell
Phagocytosis
Type III Hypersensitivity is associated with what disorders?
Arthus Reaction
Serum Sickness
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Systemic Lupus Erythamatosis
Malaria
Type III Hypersensitivity uses what immune mechanism?
Antigen/Antibody Complex
Type IV Hypersensitivity is associated with what disorders?
Tuberculosis
Contact Dermatisis (eg. Poison Oak)
Transplant Rejections (Don't confuse with Type II which is associated with Transfusion reactions)
Botulism blocks the release of what?
ACH (Acetyl Choline)
Tetanus is associated with what problem?
Trismus: "Lock Jaw" or sustained spasm of the neck and jaw muscles.
Tetanus blocks what neurotransmitters?
GABA and Glycine
Chronic Osteomyelitis is associated with what pathogen?
Staph. Aureus
A "Brodies Abscess" is most commoly caused by what pathogen?
Staph. Aureus
What is "Brodies Abscess?"
A chronic bone infection commonly found in children
Toxic Shock is caused by what pathogen?
Staph Aureus
If you have a Staph Aureus infection, how long does it take to display?
2-4 hours with no fever
Salmonella Enteritidis is contracted from what?
Chicken fecies
Salmonella Enteritidis comes on how long after it is contracted?
12-48 hours with a fever