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46 Cards in this Set

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This is an example of what a data table looks like. By convention (tradition) the independent variable is in the left column.

NY State Regents Exam
June 2004
(IMAGE)
None
This is an example of a line GRAPH.

NY State Regents Exam
June 2005
(IMAGE)
None
This is what a graduated cylinder looks like. It is most commonly used to measure the volume of a liquid.


NY State Regents Exam
January 2005
(IMAGE)
None
Diagram of an ATOM, showing the nucleus (protons and neutrons) and the electrons.

(C)www.scienceaid.co.uk.
http://www.scienceaid.co.uk/chemistry/basics/theatom.html
(IMAGE)
None
Paper CHROMATOGRAPHY.

(c) Dorling Kindersley

http://www.dkimages.com/discover/Home/Science/Physics-and-Chemistry/Experiments/Unassigned/Unassigned-006.html
(IMAGE)
None
This is an example of an electronic balance used to measure mass.

© American Weigh

http://www.americanweigh.com/product_info.php?products_id=42
(IMAGE)
None
This picture shows some structures typical of BACTERIA.

© British Broadcasting Corporation
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/human/defendingagainstinfectionrev2.shtml
(IMAGE)
None
Carbon with its 4 valence electrons.

(c) Dorling Kindersley
http://www.dkimages.com/discover/previews/740/55147.JPG
(IMAGE)
None
This is one example of a diagram. You already know what a VENN diagram looks like, so that's 2 examples. Can you name the process depicted? An example of an "organic compound?"

NY State Regents Exam
June 2004
(IMAGE)
None
This is what a triple-beam balance looks like.

(c) Scales Now
http://www.scalesnow.com/ohaus-scales.htm
(IMAGE)
None
This is an example of a thermometer.

© D. Edmunds & Co
http://www.thetipsbank.com/thermometer.htm
(IMAGE)
None
Enzyme
(The substance labeled "catalyst")

NY State Regents Exam
June 2001
(Image)
None
Carbon dioxide molecule

© 2007 The Kauaian Institute
http://kauaian.net/blog/wp-content/themes/default/images/sushi/co2molecule.jpg
(IMAGE)
None
Animal Cell Parts

A - Ribosomes
B - Cell membrane
C - Nucleus
D - Cytoplasm
E - Mitochondria

The American Physiological Society (modified)
http://www.the-aps.org/education/lot/cell/cell-ebration.html
(IMAGE)
None
Chain (a group of simpler molecules linked together to make more complex molecule).

Proteins, starches, nucleic acids, are all chains.
(IMAGE)
None
Plant Cell Parts

A - Cell Wall
B - Vacuole
C - Cell membrane
D - Cytoplasm
E - Chloroplasts
F - Nucleus
G - Mitochondria

Shannan Muskopf (modified)
www.biologycorner.com/bio1/cell.html
(IMAGE)
None
Compound microscope. A microscope consisting of two lenses (A, B, in picture) that multiply the magnification power of a single lens.

Mrs. Dotson's Biology Page
http://www.geocities.com/auburngirl71/diagram.htm
(IMAGE)
None
Compounds. Two or more chemical elements chemically bonded. Can be covalent bonds, ionic bonds, etc.

Virginia Science Standards of Learning Test (modified)
http://www.fcps.k12.va.us/FranklinShermanES/Ristig/Matter-5.html
(IMAGE)
None
Dichotomous key. Identify Species X...

NY State Regents Exam
June 2006
(IMAGE)
None
Diffusion

NY State Regents Exam (modified)
August 2002
(IMAGE)
None
DNA

NY State Regents Exam
January 2003
(IMAGE)
None
Molecules. Can be single element or combinations of different elements. Must be covalently bonded. Ions do not form molecules.

Virginia Science Standards of Learning Test (modified)
http://www.fcps.k12.va.us/FranklinShermanES/Ristig/Matter-5.html
(IMAGE)
None
One-celled organism. Individual living things made of a single cell. From left: Euglena, amoeba, paramecium.

Massachusetts Dept. Of Education
http://www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/question.asp?mcasyear=2006&district=488&school=&grade=08&subjectcode=SCI&questionnumber=20
(IMAGE)
None
pH Scale

Manitoba Conservation (modified)
http://www.gov.mb.ca/conservation/annual-report/soe-reports/soe95/air.html
(IMAGE)
None
Photosynthesis. Note the "inputs" (Light, H20, CO2) and the "outputs" (O2, glucose). The structure in which this occurs is called the chloroplast.

NY State Regents Exam
June 2002
(IMAGE)
None
Protein. Start with a chain of amino acids, which can then be folded in a particular way to give the protein its final, 3D shape.

Wikipedia (modified)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosetta@home
(IMAGE)
None
Protein building. At the ribosomes, the code contained in mRNA is translated into a chain of amino acids.

from: M. J. Malachowski, Ph.D.
http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/~mmalacho/physio/oll/Lesson2/intro2P.html
(IMAGE)
None
Shape of protein. Proteins come in an immense variety of shapes and sizes, all related to their specific functions.

Essential Cell Biology 2/e (Garland Science 2004)
(modified)
http://fig.cox.miami.edu/~cmallery/255/255prot/ecb4x9.jpg
(IMAGE)
None
Starch. A chain of glucose molecules. A typical starch molecule can consist of literally thousands of these glucose molecules linked together.

University of Manitoba (modified)
http://www.umanitoba.ca/Biology/BIOL1020/lab2/biolab2_2.html
(IMAGE)
None
Stereoscope

Aunet Scientific
http://aunet.com.au/stereo_microscope.htm
(IMAGE)
None
A - Testes (sperm production)
B,E,F - Glands (secrete chemicals)
C - Sperm duct (Sperm transport)
D - Bladder (Urine Storage)
G - Urethra (Releases sperm)
H - Tip of penis (Final exit point for sperm)

The sperm, along with the chemicals secreted by various glands, make up the semen.

NY State Regents Exam
June 2007
(Image)
Food Web.

Energy for a food web starts with the sun. Decomposers recycle MATTER.

NY State Regents Exam June 2002
Image
Dropping cover slip at an angle onto specimen in preparing a wet-mount slide. Minimizes air bubbles.

NY State Regents Exam
January 2006
(Image)
Antibody/Antigen. The shape of the antibody (B) must match with the shape of an antigen (A).

National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Disease (modified)
www.niaid.nih.gov/final/immun/immun.htm
(IMAGE)
None
Breakdown. An enzyme breaks down sucrose (more complex) into glucose and fructose (less complex molecules).

Paul Slichter, Gresham HS (modified)
http://ghs.gresham.k12.or.us/science/ps/sci/ibbio/chem/notes/chpt8/chpt8.htm
(IMAGE)
None
Chemical signals. Chemicals (A) produced in one cell (X) that "signal" a response in another cell (Y). Neurotransmitters are one example.

NY State Regents Exam
June 2004
(IMAGE)
None
Engulf. The cell membrane "pinches in" and around a particle (food, for example) and takes it in.

Larry MacPhee, Northern Arizona University (modified)
http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/~lrm22/lessons/endocytosis/endocytosis.html
(IMAGE)
None
Feedback mechanism. AKA control mechanism.

NY State Regents Exam
August 2002
(IMAGE)
None
Infectious agent. AKA pathogen. Viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, etc. Most are microscopic, one-celled organisms.

San Diego Natural History Museum
http://www.sdnhm.org/exhibits/epidemic/teachers/museum-microbe.html
(IMAGE)
None
Pancreas (B). Functions as both an endocrine gland (hormones) and a digestive organ (digestive enzymes). Located behind the stomach (A). Gall bladder (C) stores bile from the liver (not pictured).

(modified)
U.S. National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program
http://training.seer.cancer.gov/module_anatomy/unit6_3_endo_glnds4_pancreas.html
(IMAGE)
None
Receptors (A). Molecules, typically found on cell membrane surfaces, that receive chemical messages from another cell. Pictured here is a cell receiving a signal from a nerve cell.

©Nobel Web AB 2007 (modified)
http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/2000/press.html
(IMAGE)
None
Virus. A typical virus consisting of little more than a protein coat (capsid) surrounding the virus's genetic material (DNA or RNA).

©Thomson Learning, Inc.
http://www.dwm.ks.edu.tw/bio/activelearner/23/ch23c1.html
(IMAGE)
None
Enzyme Action. Enzymes work best at an optimum set of conditions as shown in the graph. On the X axis are variables that can affect enzyme action, which include temperature and pH.

NY State Regents Exam
June 2004
(IMAGE)
Levels of organization of an organism. Outside of "organ systems" is the individual organism. Pay attention to the order.

NY State Regents Exam
June 2007
(IMAGE)
Osmosis in an onion cell. When the cells (A) are placed in saltwater solution, water diffuses OUT of the cell, causing the cell membrane and cytoplasm to shrink away from the cell wall (B)

NY State Regents Exam
August 2005
(IMAGE)
Synthesis. Two simpler molecules ("substrates") are joined by the enzyme to form a more complex "product."

©Chem4kids.com (modified)
http://www.chem4kids.com/files/bio_enzymes.html
(IMAGE)