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6 Cards in this Set

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two general types of neurological disorders
disseminated, lesions may be found at different sites in one hemisphere or occur in both hemispheres or throughout the brain and spinal cord, although they are not necessarily random ///// Single site/lesion disorders This may involve one or more nuclei or pathways, but all in one area
most common site of aneurysms
Arterial junctions of vessels in the Circle of Willis
The Circle of Willis lies in the…
interpeduncular cistern over the interpeduncular fossa
Areas supplied by anterior cerebral artery
1.Most of the medial aspect of the brain as far back as the parieto-occipital sulcus 2. The dorsal "ridge" of the cerebral hemispheres including the "leg" areas of the pre- and post-central gyri 3. Other branches pierce the anterior perforated substance to supply parts of the basal ganglia (motor nuclei deep in the cerebral hemispheres) and the internal capsule (a major fiber pathway consisting of axons going to and from the cortex)
Areas supplied by middle cerebral artery
1. Branches supply the entire lateral surface of the hemisphere except the dorsal ridge area, the occipital lobe, and the inferolateral surface of the temporal lobe 2. Other branches pierce the anterior perforated substance to supply the basal ganglia and the internal capsule (the lenticulo-striate branches of the middle cerebral a. are the most important blood supply to the internal capsule; these vessels are very thin-walled in man and strokes involving them are common)
Areas supplied by posterior cerebral artery
1. The lateral and medial surface of the occipital lobe 2. The inferolateral surface and some medial parts of the temporal lobe 3. Other branches pierce the posterior perforated substance to supply parts of the thalamus, midbrain, and other structures; small branches enter the lateral ventricles to supply the choroid plexus