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415 Cards in this Set

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Abas
(a' bas)
son of Lynceus and Hypermnestra and grandfather of Perseus
Acca Larentia
(ak' ka lar-en' shi-a)
wife of Faustulus who raised Romulus and Remus
Acamas
(ak' a-mas)
son of Theseus and Phaedra
Acestes
(a-ses' tēz)
one of Odysseus' men, encountered by Aeneas
Achaeus
(ak-ē' us)
eponymous ancestor of the Achaeans
Acheron
(ak' e-ron)
river of "Woe" in the Underworld
Acheloüs
(ak-e-lō' us)
river in western Greece and its god, with whom Heracles wrestled for Deïanira
Achilles
(a-kil' lēz)
son of Peleus and Thetis and the greatest Greek hero in the Trojan war
Acis
(ā' sis)
Galatea's beloved, changed into a river-god
Acrisius
(ak-ris' i-us)
Danaë's father, accidently killed by Perseus
Acropolis
(a-kro' po-lis)
hill of Athens on which the Parthenon and Erechtheum were built
Actaeon
(ak-tē' on)
son of Aristaeus and Autonoë whom Artemis turned into a stag because he saw her naked
Adonis
(a-do' nis)
son of Cinyras and Myrrha and Aphrodite's beloved, fatally wounded by a boar's tusk, and a resurrection god, from whose blood sprang the anemone
Admetus
(ad-mē' tus)
king of Pherae who accepts the offer of his wife Alcestis to die in his place
Adrasteia
(ad-ra-stē' a) or (ad-ra-stī' a)
Necessity, a concept or goddess
Adrastus
(a-dras' tus)
(1) the sole survivor of the Seven against Thebes; (2) son of Gordias, accidental murderer of Croesus' son, Atys
Aea
(ē' a)
"Land," for Homer, the place to which the Argonauts sailed
Aeacus
(ē' a-kus)
a judge in the Underworld and father of Peleus
Aeaea
(ē-ē' a)
island, home of Circe
Aeëtes
(ē-ē' tēz)
"Man of the Land," son of Helius, king of Colchis, and father of Medea
Aegeus
(ē' je-us)
son of Pandion and Theseus' father (as Poseidon) who gives his name to the Aegean sea
Aegialia
(ē-ji-a-lī' a)
unfaithful wife of Diomedes
Aegimius
(ē-jim' i-us)
king of the Dorians, helped by Heracles
Aegina
(ē-jī' na)
Asopus' daughter, carried off by Zeus
Aegis
(ē-jis)
"goatskin," shield, especially that of Zeus and Athena
Aegisthus
(ē-jis' thus) or (e-jis' thus)
son of Thyestes and lover of Clytemnestra
Aegyptus
(ē-jip' tus)
king of Egypt, brother of Danaüs, and father of fifty sons
Aeneas
(ē-nē' as) or
(e-nē' as)
Trojan warrior, son of Aphrodite (Venus) and Anchises, husband of Creusa and Lavinia, father of Ascanius (Iulus), and the hero of Virgil's Aeneid
Aeolus
(ē' ō-lus)
(1) keeper of the winds, encountered by Odysseus; (2) son of Hellen, father of Sisyphus, and eponymous ancestor of the Aeolians (ē' ō-li-anz)
Aër
(a' er)*
the lower atmosphere
Aërope
(a-er' o-pē)
Atreus' wife, seduced by Thyestes
Aesculapius
(ēs-ku-lā' pi-us) or (es-ku-lā pi-us)
Latin name for Asclepius
Aeson
(ē' son)
son of Cretheus and Tyro, and Jason's father, rejuvenated by Medea
Aether
(ē' ther)
upper atmosphere, offspring of Night and Erebus
Aethra
(ē' thra)
daughter of Pittheus and mother of Theseus
Aetolia
(ē-tō' li-a)
Aetolian(s), region in central Greece
Agamemnon
(ag-a-mem' non)
king of Mycenae, leader of the Greeks against Troy, and murdered by his wife Clytemnestra
Agathyrsus
(ag-a-thir' sus)
son of Geryon and Echidna
Agave
(a-gā' vē)
daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia and mother of Pentheus
Ager Laurens
(ag' er law' renz)
territory in Italy, where Aeneas founded Lavinium
Aglauros
(a-glaw' ros)
"Bright," daughter of Cecrops
Agyrtes
(a-jir' tēz)
trumpeter who tricked Achilles on Scyros
Aias
(ī' as)
See: Ajax
Ajax
(ā' jax)
Greek spelling, Aias: (1) the Great or Greater, Telamon's son (Telamonius) who committed suicide; (2) the Les or Lesser, Oïleus' son who raped Cassandra
Akkadian
(ak-ka' di-an)
pertaining to the area of Akkad
Alba, Alba Longa
(al' ba lon' ga)
Latin city, founded by Iulus
Alcaeus
(al-sē' us)
father of Amphitryon and grandfather of Heracles
Alcestis
(al-ses' tis)
wife of Admetus who offered to die in his place
Alcibiades
(al-si-bī' a-dēz)
Athenian statesman accused of mutilation of the herms and desecration of the mysteries
Alcides
(al-sī' dēz)
name of Heracles as grandson of Alcaeus
Alcinoüs
(al-sin' ō-us)
king of the Phaeacians and father of Nausicaä
Alcmaeon
(alk-mē' on)
Amphiaraüs' son who led the Epigoni against Thebes and murdered his mother
Alcmena or Alcmene
(alk-mē' na) (alk-mē' nē)
seduced by Zeus to become the mother of Heracles
Alcyone
(al-si' ō-nē)
wife of Ceyx, turned into a sea-bird (alcyone, "halcyon")
Alcyoneus
(al-si'ō' e-us) or (al-si-ōn' ūs)
(1) brigand killed by Heracles; (2) giant killed by Heracles in the Gigantomachy
Alexander
*
See: Paris
Alexander the Great
*
356-323 B.C., king of Macedonia, who conquered Greece and the the Persian empire, in campaigns that extended as far as India
Allecto
(a-lek' tō)
a Fury
Aloeus
(a-lō' e-us) or (a-lō' ūs)
(1) father of Otus and Ephialtes, the Aloadae (al-ō' a-dē); (2) brother of Aeëtes
Althaea
(al-thē' a)
mother of Meleager
Amalthea
(am-al-thē' a)
the goat whose milk nurtured the infant Zeus
Amazon(s)
(a' ma-zon)
warklike women from the northern limits of the world
Ambrosia
(am-brō' si-a)
ambrosial, divine, fragrant; the food of the gods
Amor
(a' mor)
"Love," another name for Cupid
Amphanaea
(am-fa-nē' a)
town in Thessaly
Amphiaraüs
(am-fi-a-rā' us)
(1) one of the Seven against Thebes and a prophet, swallowed up in the earth; (2) Amphiaraüm, shrine to Amphiaraüs at Oropus
Amphimedon
(am'fi' me-don)
one of Penelope's suitors
Amphion
(am-fī' on)
musician, king of Thebes, son of Zeus and Antiope
Amphitrite
(am-fi-trī' te)
Nereid, wife of Poseidon
Amphitryon
(am-fi' tri-on)
the husband of Alcmena
Amulius
(a-mū' li-us)
king of Alba Longa who usurped power from his brother Numitor and opposed Rhea Silvia and her twins
Amycus
(am' i-kus)
Poseidon's son and a boxer, killed by Polydeuces
Amymone
(a-mi' mō-nē)
Danaïd changed into a spring near Argos
Amythaon
(am-i-thā' on)
son of Cretheus and Tyro, and father of Bias and Melampus
Ananke
(a-nan' kē)
Necessity, a concept or goddess
Anaxarete
(a-nax-ar' e-tē)
scorned her lover Iphis and was turned into stone
Ancaeus
(an-sē' us)
helmsman of the Argo, replacing Tiphys
Anchises
(an-kī' sēz)
a Trojan prince, seduced by Aphrodite, and father of Aeneas
Ancile
(an' si-le)
'shield', (pl. ancilia, an-si' li-a), sent by Jupiter to be a talisman of Roman power
Androgeos
(an-droj' e-os)
son of Minos and Pasiphaë killed in Attica
Andromache
(an-dro' ma-kē)
wife of Hector, mother of Astyanax, and captive fo Neoptolemus
Andromeda
(an-dro' me-da)
daughter of Cepheus and Cassiepea, and the wife of Perseus
Anemone
(a-nem' ō-nē)
flower that Aphrodite made grow from Adonis' blood
Anius
(an' i-us)
son of Apollo and king of Delos whose three daughters were turned into doves, sacrosanct at Delos
Anna Perenna
(per-en' na)
Italian goddess of the New Year, identified with Anna, Dido's sister
Antaeus
(an-tē' us)
son of Poseidon and Ge and an opponent of Heracles
Antea
(an-tē' a)
Homer's name for Stheneboea, wife of Proetus
Antenor
(an-tē' nor)
brother of Hecuba and father of Laocoön
Anticlea
(an-ti-klē' a)
daughter of Autolycus and mother of Odysseus whom Odysseus meets in the Underworld
Antigone
(an-tig' o-nē)
Oedipus' faithful daughter who buries Polynices in defiance of Creon
Antilochus
(an-ti' lo-kus)
son of Nestor
Antinoüs
(an-ti' no-us)
one of Penelope's suitors
Antiope
(an-tī' o-pē)
(1) Amazon won by Theseus and the mother of Hippolytus; (2) the mother of Aeëtes and Aleous; (3) Nycteus' daughter, seduced by Zeus, and mother of Amphion and Zethus
Anu
(a' nu)
Babylonian-Hittite sky god
Apemosyne
(ap-e-mos' i-nē)
daughter of Catreus and sister of Althaemenes, who killed her
Aphrodite
(af-fō-dī' tē)
daughter of Uranus alone (Aphrodite Urania) or daughter of Zeus and Dione (Aphrodite Pandemos), goddess of love and beauty, equated by the Romans with Venus; (Pandemos; Urania)
Apis
(a' pis)
Egyptian bull-god
Apollo
(a-pol' lō)
son of Zeus and Leto (Latona), the Greek and Roman god of reason and intelligence, music (the lyre), prophecy, medicine, and the sun, Apollonian; Delphinius (del-fin' i-us), a title of Apollo
Appaliunas
(ap-pa-li-ūn's)
name for Apollo found in Hittite inscription
Apples of the Hesperides
(hes-per' i-dēz)
the eleventh Labor of Heracles
Apsu
(ap' sū)
(1) fresh water; (2) husband of Tiamat
Apsyrtus
(ap-sir' tus)
brother of Medea whom Medea (or Jason) murdered
Arachne
(a-rak' nē)
"Spider," the woman who challenged Athena in spinning and weaving and was turned into a spider
Arcas
(ak' kas)
the son of Zeus and Callisto who was turned into the constellation Bear Warden or Little Bear
Arcesilas
(ar-ke' si-las)
king of Cyrene to whom a Pindaric Ode is addressed
Archemorus
(ar-kem' or-us)
See: Opheltes
Archon basileus
(ar' kon bas' i-lūs)
Athenian official in charge of religion
Arctophylax or Arcturus
(ark-to-fī' lax) (ark-tū' rus)
star in the constellation Bootes, into which Arcas was changed
Arctus
(ark' tus)
the constellation Great Bear, into which Callisto was changed
Ardiaeus
(ar-di-ē' us)
a tyrant hurled down into Tartarus forever (in Plato's Myth of Er)
Areopagus
(ar-ē-op' a-gus)
the Athenian court, originally constituted by Athena for the trying of Orestes
Ares
(ar' ēz)
(1) son of Zeus and Hera, god of war, equated by the Romans with Mars; (2) island of Ares
Arestor
(a-res' tor)
father of Argus who built the Argo
Arete
(a' re-tē)
Phaeacian queen, wife of Alcinoüs
Arethusa
(ar-e-thū' sa)
nymph pursued by Alpheus and turned into a fountain in Syracuse
Argei
(ar-jē' ī)
straw dummies offered to propitiate the god of the Tiber
Argeiphontes
(ar-jē-i-fon' tēz) or (ar-jē-fon' tēz)
"Slayer of Argus," epithet of Hermes; see, also: Argus Panoptes
Arges
(ar' jēz)
"Bright," one of the three Cyclopes
Argo
(ar' gō)
"Swift," the ship of Jason and the Argonauts, built by Argus
Argonaut, Argonauts
(ar' gō-notz), Argonautic
"the sailors of the Argo"
Argos
(ar' gos)
a city and its region (Argolid, ar' go-lid) in the northern Peloponnese, Argive(s)
Argus
(ar' gus)
(1) see, also: Argeiphontes: Arestor's son, builder of the Argo; (2) Argus Panoptes (pan-op' tēz), the "all-seeing" guardian of Io killed by Hermes; (3) Odysseus' dog; (4) son of Phrixus and Chalciope
Ariadne
(ar-i-ad' nē)
(1) Ariadne Aphrodite; (2) daughter of Minos and Pasiphaë, abandoned by Theseus on Naxos and saved by Dionysus
Arion
(a-rī' on)
(1) Adrastus' horse, offspring of Poseidon and Demeter; (2) of Lesbos, a famous musician, saved by a dolphin
Aristaeus
(ar-is-t-ē' us)
keeper of bees, son of Apollo and Cyrene, husband of Autonoë, and father of Actaeon
Aristophanes
(a-ris-to' fa-nēz)
Greek comic playwright, speaker in Plato's Symposium
Artemis
(ar' te-mis)
daughter of Zeus and Leto, virgin goddess of chastity, the hunt, childbirth, and the moon, and equated by the Romans with Diana; see, also: Hecate
Ascanius
(as-kā' ni-us)
Aeneas' son, also called Iulus (or Julus)
Asclepius
(ak-klē' pi-us)
son of Apollo and Coronis and Greek god of medicine (Aesculapius for the Romans)
Asopus
(a-sō' pus)
river and its god in Boeotia and father of Aegina
Astarte
(as-tar' tē)
Phoenician goddess, resembling Aphrodite
Astyanax
(as-tī' a-naks)
infant son of Hector and Andromache, thrown to his death from the walls of Troy
Astydamia
(as-ti-da-mī' a) or (as-ti-da-mē' a)
wife of Acastus, king of Iolcus; she fell in love with Peleus
Atalanta
(at-a-lan' ta)
daughter of Boeotian Schoeneus or Arcadian Iasus, virgin huntress, participant in the Calydonian boar hunt and Argonautic quest, and great runner, defeated in a footrace by Milanion (or Hippomenes)
Atargatis
(a-tar' ga-tis)
Syrian mother-goddess of mysteries
Athamas
(ath' a-mas)
husband of Nephele and Ino and father of Phrixus and Helle
Athena
(a-thē' na)
born from Zeus' head after he had swallowed Metis; virgin goddess of wisdom, war; (a) Athena Parthenos (par' the-nos), Pheidias' statue of Athena in the Parthenon; (b) Athena Polias, Athena as Guardian of the City; (c) Tritogeneia
Athloi
(ath' loy)
the Greek word for labors
Atlantis
(at-lan' tis)
mythical island
Atlas
(at' las)
son of Iapetus and Clymene, punished by Zeus with the task of holding up the sky, and turned into a mountain range by Perseus' Gorgon's head
Atrahasis
(atra' has-is)
(1) "extra wise," epithet of Ut-Napishtim; (2) survivor of the flood sent by Enlil
Atreus
(a' tre-us)
(1) king of Mycenae, son of Pelops, brother of Thyestes, and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus; (2) treasury of Atreus
Atropos
(at' rō-pos)
"Inflexible," the one on the three Fates who cuts off the thread of a person's life
Attis
(at' tis)
Cybele's beloved, who was driven mad, castrated himself, died, and became a resurrection-god of a mystery religion
Atys
(a' tis)
son of Croesus, accidentally murdered by Adrastus
Augeas
(aw-jē' as)
(1) son of Helius and king of Elis; (2) Augean (aw-jē' an) Stables, fifth Labor of Heracles
Auge
(aw' jē)
mother of Odysseus' son of Telephus
Aulis
(aw' lis)
port of the coast of Boeotia, from with the Greeks sailed against Troy
Aurora
(aw-ror' a)
the Roman name of Eos, goddess of the dawn
Autolycus
(aw-tol' i-kus)
Hermes' son, a master-thief, father of Anticlea and grandfather of Odysseus
Automedon
(aw-to' me-don)
charioteer of Achilles
Autonoë
(aw-ton' ō-ē)
daughter of Cadmus and Harmonia, wife of Aristaeus and mother of Actaeon
Baucis
(baw' kis)
she and her husband Philemon, a pious old couple, entertained Zeus and Hermes and were rewarded
Bellerophon
(bel-ler' ō-fon)
Sisyphus' grandson who tamed Pegasus and killed the Chimaera
Bellona
(bel-lō' na)
Roman war goddess
Belus
(bē' lus)
father of Aegyptus and Danaüs
Beroë
(ber' o-ë)*
child of Aphrodite and eponymous ancestor of the city of Berytus
Besika Bay
(bes' ika)
site of Mycenaean cemetery near Troy
Besik Tepe
(bes' ika tā' pe)
Bronze age tumulus at the site of Troy
Bias
(bī' ton)
he and his brother Cleobis were judged the second happiest of men by Solon
Black Sea
See: Euxine
Boeotia
(bē-ō' shi-a)
Boeotian, region in Greece, north of Attica
Boötes
(bō-ō' tez)
constellation into which Arcas was changed
Briareus
(brī-ā' re-us)
one of the three Hecatonchires
Briseïs
(brī-sē' is)
Achilles' beloved, taken by Agamemnon
Brontes
(bron' tēz)
"Thunder," one of the three Cyclopes
Bronze Age
historical period between the Neolithic and Iron Ages, third of the legendary four Ages
Bull of Heaven
monstrous opponent, killed by Gilgamesh and Enkidu
Bull of Marathon
(mara a-thon)
one of Theseus' labors
Busiris
(bū-sī' ris)
king of Egypt, killed by Heracles
Byblis
(bib' lis)
Miletus' daughter who loved her brother Caenus and was turned into a fountain called by her name
Cabiri
(ka-bī' rī)
great gods of a mystery cult
Cacus
(kā' kus)
"Bad," Italian fire-god, Vulcan's son, who stole Heracles' cattle and was killed by him
Cadmus
(kad' mus)
Theban king, son of Agenor, brother of Europa, and husband of Harmonia
Caduceus
(ka-dū' se-us)
herald's wand, especially that of Hermes
Caeneus
(sē' ne-us)
See: Caenis
Caenis
(sē' nis)
a Lapith girl turned into a man named Caeneus
Calaïs
(ka' la-is)
he and his brother Zetes were winged sons of Boreas and Orithyia, and Argonauts
Calchas
(kal-kas)
Greek prophet in the Trojan War
Calliope
(ka-lī' o-pē)
Muse of epic poetry
Callirhoë
(kal-lir' o-ē)
(1) an Oceanid, wife of Chrysaor and mother of Geryon and Echidna; (2) daughter of Acheloüs and wife of Alcmaeon
Callisto
(kal-lis' tō)
daughter of Lycaon and Artemis' follower who mated with Zeus, bore Arcas, was turned into a bear, and became the constellation Great Bear
Calydon
(kal' li-don)
(1) a city in Aetolia in western Greece; (2) Calydonian (ka-li-dō' ni-an) boar hunt
Calypso
(ka-lip' sō)
Atlas' daughter who detained Odysseus on her island, Ogygia
Camilla
(ka-mil' la)
Etruscan leader of the Volscians, warrior maiden, killed by Arruns
Canace
(kan' a-sē)
daughter of Aeolus and mother of a child by her brother Macareus
Cancer
constellation of the crab Hera sent to help the Lernaean Hydra
Capaneus
(kap' an-e-us)
Evadne's husband, one of the Seven against Thebes, struck down by Zeus
Carthage
(kar' thage)
city in north Africa, kingdom of Dido, and enemy of Rome
Cassandra
(kas-san' dra)
daughter of Priam and Hecuba and Apollo's beloved, whosetrue prophecies were never believed; raped by Ajax the Less and murdered by Clytemnestra
Cassiepea
(kas-si-e-pē' a)
Cepheus' wife and Andromeda's mother, who boasted she was more beautiful than the Nereids
Castor
(kas' tor)
horse-tamer and rider, son of Zeus and Leda, and brother of Polydeuces (Pollux); see, also: Dioscuri
Catreus
(ka' tre-us)
son of Minos and Pasiphaë and fated to be killed by his son Althaemenes
Cattle of Geryon
(jer' i-on)
the tenth labor of Heracles
Caunus
(kaw' nus)
Miletus' son who fled from the love of his sister Byblis
Cecrops
(sē' kropz)
Cecropian, early, autochthonous king of Athens Cecropian
Celaeno
(se-lē' no)
a Harpy who prophesied to Aeneas
Celeus
(sē' le-us)
king of Eleusis, husband of Metaneira, and father of Demophoön
Centaur
(sen' tawr)
creature with a human head and (1) torso and the legs and body of a horse; (2) Centaurus (sen-taw' rus), monstrous offspring of Ixion and Nephele and father of the centaurs
Cephalus
(sef' a-lus)
son of Hermes and Herse, lover of Eos, and husband of Procris
Cepheus
(sē' fe-us)
husband of Cassiepea and father of Narcissus
Cerberus
(ser' ber-us)
(1) the hound of Hades, offspring of Echidna and Typhon; (2) the twelfth Labor of Heracles
Cercopes
(ser-kō' pēz)
two dwarfs who attempted to steal Heracles' weapons
Cercyon
(ser' si-on)
a brigand wrestler killed by Theseus
Ceres
(sē' rēz)
Roman agricultural goddess equated with Demeter, with a temple on the Aventine
Cerynea
(se-ri-nē' a)
(1) Cerynean Hind or Stag, third Labor of Heracles; (2) mountain in Arcadia
Ceto
(sē' tō)
daughter of Pontus and Ge, wife of Phorcys, and mother of the Graeae, Gorgons, and Ladon
Ceyx
(sē' iks)
king of Trachis, husband of Alcyone, friend of Heracles and Deïanira, and turned into a seabird
Chalciope
(kal-sī' o-pē)
daughter of Aeëtes and wife of Phrixus
Chaos
(kā' os)
a "Yawning Void," the first principle for Hesiod
Chariclo
(ka-rik' lō)
nymph and mother of Tiresias
Charites
(kar' i-tēz)
See: Graces
Charon
(ka' ron)
the ferryman of the Underworld
Charybdis
(ka-rib' dis)
monstrous daughter of Poseidon and Ge; a dire obstacle, with Scylla, in the Straits of Messina
Chimaera
(kī-mē' ra)
offspring of Typhon and Echidna with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail, killed by Bellerophon
Chiron
(kī' ron)
a wise centaur, tutor of heroes
Christ
the founder of a mystery religion, dominant in the Western world, Christian, Christianity
Chronus
(kron' us)
"Time," the first principle in the Orphic theogony
Chrysaor
(krī-sā' or)
"He of the golden sword," son of Medusa and Poseidon, and father of Geryon and Echidna
Chryseïs
(krī-sē' is)
Chryses' daughter who was taken captive by Agamemnon during the Trojan War
Chrysothemis
(kri-so' them-is)
daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra who is Sophocles' foil for her sister Electra
Chthonia
(thō' ni-a),
Chthonian
(thō' ni-an),
chthonic,
chthonius
"of the earth," an epithet for deities of the earth and Underworld
Chthonius
(thō' ni-us)
one of the five Spartoi, king of Thebes, and father of Lycus and Nycteus
Cicones (si' ko-nēz), Ciconian
people of Ismarus in Thrace, encountered by Odysseus
Cilissa
(si-lis' sa)
in Aeschylus the nurse of Orestes who got him away after the murder of Agamemnon
Cinyras
(sin' i-ras)
son of Pygmalion and Galatea, seduced by his daughter Myrrha, and father of Adonis
Cios
(si' os)
city on the Asiatic shore of the Propontis, where Heracles lost Hylas and was left behind by the Argonauts
Circe
(sir' sē)
daughter of the Sun (Helius) and a sorceress on the island of Aeaea who turned men into swine; Odysseus overcame her and she gave him directions
Cithaeron
(si-thē' ron)
a mountain between Thebes and Corinth, where Bacchic revels were held and where the infant Oedipus was exposed and rescued
Clashing Rocks
See: Symplegades
Cleobis
(klē-ō' bis)
he and his brother Biton were judged the happiest of men by Solon
Cleopatra
(klē-ō-pat' ra)
(1) daughter of Boreas and Orithyia and wife of Phineus; (2) wife of Meleager
Clio
(klī' ō)
Muse of history or lyre playing
Cloaca
(klō-ā' ka):
Cloacina
(klo-sī' na) or
(klo-a-kē' na)
epithet of Venus
Clotho
(klō' thō)
"Spinner," the one of the three Fates who spins out the thread of a person's life
Clymene
(klī' me-nē)
(1) wife of Helius and mother of Phaëthon; (2) wife of Iapetus and mother of Atlas, Menoetius, Prometheus and Epimetheus; (3) wife of Iasus and mother of Atalanta, and wife of Pheres
Clytemnestra
(klī-tem-nes' tra)
daughter of Zeus and Leda; she took Aegisthus as her lover, murdered her husband Agamemnon, and was killed by her son Orestes
Clytië
(klī' ti-ē)
an Oceanid, jealous lover of Helius who turned into a sunflower
Cnossus
(knos' sus)
site of Minos' palace in Crete, excavated by Sir Arthur Evans
Codrus
(kod' rus)
last king of Athens, who sacrificed himself for his city
Coeus
(sē' us)
one of the twelve Titans, father of Leto
Colchis
(kol' kis),
Colchian(s)
a city at the eastern end of the Black Sea, to which Jason sailed for the Golden Fleece
Compitalia
(kom-pi-tā' li-a)
crossroads festival honoring the Lares
Consus
(kon' sus)
cult partner of Ops and Italian harvest god, whose Roman festival was the Consualia (kon-swa' li-a)
Corinth
(kor' inth),
Corinthian(s)
city in the northern Peloponneusus
Corona
(ko-rō' nis)
daughter of Phlegyas and unfaithful beloved of Apollo and mother of Asclepius
Cottus
(kot' tus)
one of the three Hecatonchires
Crane dance (geranos)
dance of Theseus on Delos
Creon
(krē' on)
(1) father of Megara, Heracles' wife; (2) king of Corinth, father of Glauce, whom Jason married
Crete
(krēt),
Cretan Bull,
Cretan(s)
(1) seventh Labor of Heracles; (2) large island in the Aegean, center of Minoan civilization and birthplace of Zeus
Cretheus
(krē' the-us)
king of Iolcus, husband of Tyro, and father of Aeson, Pheres, and Amythaon
Creusa
(kre-ū' sa)
(1) Aeneas' first wife, who died during Troy's capture; (2) another name for Glauce, whom Jason married; (3) daughter of Erechtheus and mother of Ion
Crisa
(kri' sa)
site of Delphi
Croesus
(krē' sus)
wealthy king of Lydia, and Atys' father, who was defeated by Cyrus and learned wisdom after his encounter with Solon
Crommyon
(krom' mi-on)
a village near Megara, home of a huge, man-eating sow, killed by Theseus
Cronus
(krō' nus)
sky-god, son of Uranus and Ge, and Rhea's husband, overthrown by his son Zeus
Cumaean Sibyl
(kū-mē' an sib' il),
Deiphobe
(dē-if' ō-bē),
Sibyl of Cumae
prophetic priestess of Apollo, and Aeneas' guide in the Underworld
Cupid
(kū' pid)
the Roman name of Eros
Curiatii
(kū-ri-ā' shi-ī) or (kū-ri-a-ti-ē)
three champions from Alba Longa who fought against the Roman Horatii
Cybele
(sib' e-lē)
Phrygian mother goddess, sprung from the earth, who loved Attis and with him was associated with a mystery religion; called Magna Mater (mag' na ma' ter), "Great Mother," by the Romans
Cycladic
(sik-la' dik)
pertaining to the islands in the Aegean encircling Delos, the Cyclades (sik-la' dēz)
Cyclops
(sī' klopz),
Cyclopes
(sī-loō' pēz)
"Orb-Eyed," three sons of Uranus and Ge, with one eye in the middle of their forehead, assistants of Hephaestus who forged the thunder and lightening bolts of Zeus; Polyphemus and the Cyclopes encountered by Dolysseus
Cycnus
(sik' nus)
(1) a robber, son of Ares, encountered by Heracles; (2) Trojan, Poseidon's son and Phaëthon's cousin, turned into a swan
Cyparissus
(sī-pa-ris' sus)
boy loved by Apollo and turned into a cypress tree (the meaning of his name)
Cyprus
(sī' prus)
an island in the eastern Mediterranean, associated with the birth of Aphrodite and a center for her worship
Cyrene
(sī-rē' nē)
nymph, loved by Apollo, mother of Aristaeus, and eponymous ancestor of the city Cyrene in Libya
Cyrus the Great
(sī' rus)
king of the Persians, who defeated Croesus
Cythera
(si' the-ra),
Cytherea
(si-thē' re-a)
an epithet of Aphrodite
Cyzicus
(siz' i-kus)
city (and its king) on the Asiatic shore of the Propontis where the Argonauts stopped
Daedalus
(dē' da-lus)
artisan and inventor, Icarus' father, who devised the Labyrinth, a hollow cow for Pasiphaë to satisfy her passion, and wings for flying
Danaë
(da' na-ē)
Acrisius' daughter and Perseus' mother, destined to bear a son who would killer her father
Danaïds
(dan' a-idz)
Danaüs' fifty daughters, who married Aegyptus' fifty sons
Danaüs
(dan' a-us)
Egyptian, Belus' son and Aegyptus' brother who became king of Argos and had fifty daughters
Daphne
(daf' nē)
"Laurel," Peneus' daughter who rejected Apollo's advances and was turned into his sacred laurel tree
Dardanelles
(dar' da-nelz)
the straits between Europe and Asia
Dardanus
(dar' da-nus)
son of Zeus and king of Troy; from him the land was called Dardania (dar-da' ni-a) and its people Dardani (dar' da-nī)
Dawn
See: Eos
Day
offspring of Night and Erebus
Dea Syria
(dē' a sir' i-a)
"Syrian Goddess"
Deïanira
(dē-ya-nī' ra)
daughter of Oeneus, wife of Heracles, and responsible for his death by means of Nessus' blood
Deïdamia
(dē-i-da-mī' a) or (dē-i-da-mē' a)
(1) daughter of Lycomedes, king of Scyros and mother of Achilles' son Neoptolemus; (2) wife of Pirithoüs
Deiphobe
(dē-if' ō-bē)
See: Cumaean Sibyl
Deïphobus
(dē-if' ō-bus)
son of Priam and husband of Helen, after Paris' death
Delos
(dē' los),
Delian
(dē' li-an)
island in the Aegean, birthplace of Apollo and Artemis, and a sanctuary of Apollo
Delphi
(del' fī),
Delphinius
(del-fin' i-us),
Delphic
(del' fic)
a title of Apollo; Panhellenic sanctuary sacred to Apollo, center for games and contests and his oracle
Demeter
(de-mē' ter)
daughter of Cronus and Rhea, goddess of the ripe grain, vegetation, agriculture, and the Eleusinian Mysteries, and Persephone's mother, equated with Ceres by the Romans
Demigods
(de' mi-gods)
children of a deity and a mortal
Demodocus
(de-mo' do-kus)
a bard in Homer's Odyssey
Demophon
(de' mo-fon)
son of Theseus and Phaedra and king of Athens; See, also: Demophoön
Demophoön
(de-mof' ō-on) or
Demophon
(de' mo-fon)
son of Celeus and Metaneira and nursed by Demeter
Deucalion (dū-kā' li-on)
(1) son of Minos and Pasiphaë and father of Idomeneus; (2) son of Prometheus and husband of Pyrrha, the Greek Noah of the archetypal flood story
Dexamenus (deks-a' me-nus)
"Receiver," a prince whose daughter Heracles helped
Diana
(dī-an' a)
goddess, equated by the Romans with Artemis
Dictys
(dik' tis)
"Net," fisherman, savior of Danaë and Perseus and brother of Polydectes
Dido
(dī' dō)
also called Elissa, Phoenician queen of Carthage who loved Aeneas and committed suicide when he left her
Dike
(di' k) or
(dī' kē)
"Justice," daughter of Zeus and Themis
Diomedes
(dī-ō-mē' dēz)
son of Ares, and owner of mares, who was encountered by Heracles, the Mares of Diomedes, the eighth Labor of Heracles; (2) son of Tydeus, king of Argos and often teamed with Odysseus at Troy and exchanged armor with Glaucus
Dione
(dī-ō-nē)
mate of Zeus and mother of Aphrodite Pandemos, Common Aphrodite
Dionysus
(dī-ō-nī' sus)
son of Semele and reborn from Zeus' thigh, savior of Ariadne, god of the grape and the vine, vegetation, wine, intoxication, sex, irrationality, music, dancing, ecstasy, whom the Romans called Bacchus, Dionysiac or Dionysian
Dioscuri
(dī-os-kū' rī)
"Sons of Zeus" and Leda, Castor and Polydeuces (Pollux), patron deities of ships and sailors
Diotima
(dī-ō-tī' ma)
woman from Mantinea who taught Socrates about love
Dirce
(dir' sē)
fountain in Thebes, wife of Lycus, persecutor of Antiope, and killed by Amphion and Zethus
Discord
See: Eris
Dis or Dis Pater
(dis pa' ter)
Roman name for Pluto. See: Hades
Dithyramb
(dith' i-ramb)
choral song, especially one in honor of Dionysus
Dius Fidius
(di' us fi' di-us)
Sabine god of Good Faith (Fides), identified with Jupiter
Dodona
(do-dō' na)
sanctuary and oracle of Zeus, in northern Greece
Dorus
(dōr' us)
son of Hellen and eponymous ancestor of the Dorians
Ea
(ē' a)
Babylonian god
Earth,
Gaia,
Gaea, or
Ge
sprung from Chaos, great mother-goddess of earth and fertility and wife of Uranus
Echidna
(e-kid' na)
half nymph and half snake, mate of Typhon and her son Orthus, and mother of monsters; (2) Snake Woman who bore Heracles' three sons
Echo
nymph who became only a voice; she was pursued by Pan and rejected by Narcissus
Egeria
(e-jē' ri-a)
water-nymph helpful to pregnant women and councilor to King Numa
Eileithyia
(ī-lī-thī' ya) or (ē-lē-thī' ya)
goddess of childbirth and daughter of Zeus and Hera
Eïoneus
(e-i-ō' ne-us)
father of Dia, murdered by her husband Ixion
Eirene
"Peace," daughter of Zeus and Themis
Pronunciation addition pending
Electra
(e-lek' tra)
(1) an Oceanid, wife of Thaumas and mother of Iris and the Harpies; (2) Clytemnestra's daughter, who hated her mother for the murder of her father Agamemnon and waited for the return of her brother Orestes to seek vengeance; Electra Complex
Electryon
(e-lek' tri-on)
king of Mycenae, uncle of Amphitryon, who married his daughter Alcmena
Eleusis
(e-lū' sis);
Eleusinian
(e-lū-sin' i-an)
Mysteries;
Eleusinians
a town west of Athens, center for the Mysteries of Demeter
Elis
(ē' lis)
region of Olympia in the western Peloponnesus
Elissa
(e-lis' sa)
another name of Dido
Elpenor
(el-pē' nor)
Odysseus' comrade who fell off Circe's roof, died, and in the Underworld asks Odysseus for burial
Elysium
(e-liz' i-um)
the Elysian Fields, paradise in the realm of Hades, the Elysian Fields
Enceladus
(en-sel' a-dus)
defeated giant under Mt. Aetna
Endymion
(en-dim' i-on)
the beloved of Selene, Artemis (Diana)
Enipeus
(e-nip' e-us)
river and its god in Thessaly, in whose disguise Poseidon loved Tyro
Enki
(en' ki)
Sumerian God of fresh water and wisdom
Enkidu
(en' kid-ū)
primitive hunter and friend of Gilgamesh
Enlil
(en' lil)
chief of the younger Sumerian gods
Enyo
(en' yo)
Greek personification of war
Eos
(ē' os)
daughter of Hyperion and Theia and amorous goddess of the "Dawn"; See, also: Aurora
Epaphus
(ep' a-fus)
"He of the Touch," the son of Zeus and Io
Epeus
(e-pē' us)
builder of the Trojan horse
Ephialtes
(ef-i-al' tēz)
a giant who stormed heaven; See, also: Aloadae
Epigoni
(e-pig' o-nī)
sons of the Seven against Thebes led by Alcmaeon, who made a second and successful attack
Epimetheus
(ep-i-mē' the-us)
"Afterthinker," Prometheus' brother, who accepted Pandora from Zeus
Epops
(ep' ops)
Hoopoe, the bird into which Tereus was transformed
Er
son of Armenius who died and came back to life to present the vision of the Afterlife recorded by Pluto
Pronunciation addition pending
Erato
(er' a-tō)
Muse of love poetry or hymns to the gods and lyre playing
Erebus
(er' e-bus)
the darkness of Tartarus or Tartarus itself
Erechtheum
(e-rek' thē-um)
Ionic temple on the Acropolis of Athens, dedicated to Poseidon-Erechtheus and Athena Polias
Erechtheus
(e-rek' the-us)
early king of Athens, associated with Poseidon and father of Procris, Orithyia, and Creusa
Ereshkigal
(er-esh' kee-gal)
"Mistress of Earth," Sumerian goddess, spouse of underworld god, Nergal
Erichthonius
(er-ik-thōn' i-us)
early Athenian king, confused with Erectheus, sprung from the earth, and raised by Athena
Erigone
(e-rig' ō-nē)
daughter of Icarius who hanged herself upon finding her father dead
Erinyes
(e-rin' i-ēz)
the Furies or Eumenides, dread daughters of Earth and Night, avengers of blood guilt, and punishers of sinners in the Underworld.
Eriphyle
(e-ri-fī' lē)
Amphiaraüs' wife, bribed by Polynices to persuade her husband to go to his death, and murdered by her son Alcmaeon
Eris
(er' is)
goddess of "Discord"
Eros
(er' os)
god of love, sprung from Chaos or the son of Ares and Aphrodite; his Roman name is Cupid or Amor
Erymanthus (er-i-man' thus); Erymanthian (er-i-man' thi-an) Boar (b)
mountain in Arcadia; (b) fourth Labor of Heracles
Eryx
(er' iks);
Erycina
(er-i-sī' na) (b)
king of Mt. Eryx in western Sicily whom Heracles wrestled and killed; (2) the site of a temple to Astarte, who was liked to Aphrodite and Venus; (b) an epithet of Venus
Eteocles (er-tē' ō-klēz)
son of Oedipus who killed his brother Polyneices in the attack of the Seven against Thebes
Eumaeus
(ū-mē' us)
faithful swineherd of Odysseus
Eumenides
(ū-men' i-dēz)
"Kindly Ones," another name for the Erinyes or Furies
Eumolpus
(ū-mol' pus)
son of Poseidon and Chione, prince in Eleusis
Euneos
(ū-nē' os)
son of Jason and Hypsipyle
Eunomia
(ū-nō-mi' a)
"Good Order," daughter of Zeus and Themis
Europa
(ū-rō' pa)
daughter of Agenor and sister of Cadmus, taken by Zeus in the form of a bull from Tyre to Crete where she bore Minos
Euryalus
(ū-rī' a-lus)
ally of Aeneas who with his lover Nisus dies in a night patrol
Eurybië
(ū-rib' i-ē)
daughter of Pontus and Ge
Euryclea
(ū-ri-klē' a)
nurse of Odysseus who recognized him by his scar
Eurydice
(ū-rid' i-sē)
(1) Creon's wife, who committed suicide; (2) Dryad, Orpheus' wife who died fro a snake bite (Orpheus, by his music, won her return from Hades but lost her again when he looked back too soon)
Euryphaëssa
(ū-ri-fa-es' sa)
"Widely Shining," Theia, wife of Hyperion and mother of Helius
Eurystheus
(ū-ris' the-us)
Sthenelus' son, for whom Heracles performed his labors
Eurytion
(ū-rit' i-on)
centaur; a giant herdsman, helper of Geryon, and killed by Heracles
Eurytus
(ūr' i-tus)
archer, Heracles' teacher, king of Oechalia, father of Iphitus and Iole, murdered by Heracles
Euterpe
(ū-ter' pē)
Muse of lyric poetry or tragedy and flute playing
Euxine
(ūk' sīn)
Black Sea
Evadne
(e-vad' nē)
daughter of Poseidon and mother of Iamus; widow of Capaneus who threw herself into his burning funeral pyre
Evander
(e-van' der)
father of Pallas, king of Pallanteum, and an ally of Aeneas
Fate(s)
* See, also: Moira
Further additions pending
Faunus
(faw' nus)
"Favorer," Roman woodland god of the festival of the Lupercalia, and equated with Pan or a satyr (a fawn is a satyr)
Faustulus
(faw' stu-lus)
Amulius' shepherd who rescued and brought up Romulus and Remus
Ficus ruminalis
(fi-cus / fī' kus rū-mi-na' lis)
"fig tree," marking the spot where a she-wolf found Romulus and Remus
(The) Flood
sent by Zeus to punish wicked mortals
Flora
(flo' ra)
Roman agricultural goddess of flowering, consort of Zephyrus
Forum Boarium
(bo-ar' i-um)
commercial quarter of Rome where there was a cult of Hercules, centering upon the Greatest Altar (Ara Maxima, ar' a maks' i-ma)
Furies,
Fury
See, also: Erinyes, Eumenides
Gaea
(jē' a) or
(gē' a) or
Gaia
(gī' a)
See: Earth
Galatea
(gal-a-tē' a)
(1) beloved of Pygmalion; (2) Nereid, in love with Acis and wooed by Polyphemus
Ganymede
(gan' i-mēd)
Trojan prince carried off by Zeus to become the cupbearer of the gods on Olympus
Geneneis
(jē-je' nays)
"Earth-born" giants; See, also: Giants
Ge
(jē) or
(gā)
See: Earth
Gelonus
(je-lo' nus)
son of Heracles and Echidna
Gemini
(je' me-nē) or
(je me-nī)
the constellation of the twins (Dioscuri)
Genius
(jen' i-us)
a man's creative power
Geryon (2)
(jer' i-on);
The Cattle of Geryon (1)
(1) the tenth Labor of Heracles; (2) three-bodied son of Chrysaor and Callirhoë, killed by Heracles, who took Geryon's Cattle
Geshtu-e
(gesh' tu-e)
intelligent god killed on orders of Enlil; from his flesh humankind is created
Giants;
Gigantomachy
(jī-gan-to' mak-ē)
battle of the giants against Zeus and the Olympians
Gibraltar
Pillars of Heracles
Gilgamesh
(gil' ga-mesh)
Mesopotamian hero linked to Heracles
Girdle of Hippolyta
(hip-pol' i-ta)
the ninth labor of Heracles
Glauce
(glaw' sē) or
Creusa
Creon's daughter, whom Jason married and Medea murdered
Glaucus
(glaw' kus)
Hippolochus' son who exchanged his golden armor for the bronze armor of Diomedes; (2) mortal turned into a sea-god, lover of Scylla of whom Circe was jealous; (3) son of Minos and Pasiphaë, he fell into a vat of honey and was brought back to life by Polyidus
Golden Age
the Age of Paradise
Golden Fleece
*
Further additions pending
Gorgon,
Gorgons
(gor' gonz)
three daughters of Phorcys and Ceto, so terrifying in appearance that those who looked upon them were turned into stone; only Medusa was mortal and was beheaded by Pereus
Graces,
Charites
(Latin: Gratiae)
lovely attendants of Aphrodite
Graeae
(grē' ē) or
(grī' ī) or
Graiai
(grī' ī)
"aged Ones," three sisters of the Gorgons, "Old Women," sharing one eye and one tooth, who helped Perseus
Gyes
(jī' ēz) or
(gī' ēz)
one of the three Hecatonchires
Hadad
(ha' dad)
Semetic sky-god
Hades
(hā' dēz)
Greek god of the Underworld and his realm, son of Cronus and Rhea, husband of Persephone, called Pluto or Dis by the Romans
Haemon
(hē' mon)
son of Creon and Eurydice who defies his father and kills himself to die with his beloved Antigone
Hammurabi
(ham' mūr-a-bē)
king of Babylon and lawgiver, nineteenth century B.C.
Harmonia
(har-mō' ni-a)
necklace of; the wife of Cadmus
Harpies
(har' pēz)
the "Snatchers," dread daughters of Thaumus and Electra
Hebe
(hē' bē)
"Youthful Bloom," daughter of Zeus and Hera, cupbearer to the gods, and wife of Heracles on Olympus
Hecate
(hek' a-tē)
goddess of the moon, ghosts, and witches and a dread fury in the Underworld
Hecatonchires
(hek-a-ton-kī' rēz)
"Hundred-Handed or -Armed," offspring of Uranus and Gaia
Hector
(hek' tor)
son of Priam and Hecuba, husband of Andromache, and father of Astyanax; greatest Trojan hero, killed by Achilles and ransomed by Priam
Hecuba
(hek' ū-ba) or
Hekabe
(hek' a-bē)
Priam's wife who bore him many children and was changed into a bitch
Helen
(hel'en)
daughter of Zeus and Leda and wife of Menelaüs, whom she left for Trojan Paris
Helenus
(hel' e-nus)
son of Priam and Hecuba and a prophet who married Andromache
Helius
(Hē' li-us)
sun-god, son of Hyperion and Theia, father of Phaëthon, and grandfather of Medea
Hell
See: Tartarus