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20 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
absorbtion
Drug gets
absorbed into
the bloodstream
Distribution
Drug goes to
where it is needed
Metabolism
Drug is broken
down by the liver
Elimination
Excretion from
the body
Tablets
1) Most popular dosage form
2) Prepared by mechanical compression
3) Dissolution= must be dissolved in the stomach before it can elicit its pharmacological effect
Chewable tablets
1) chewed and dissolved in the mouth prior to swallowing
2) they also can be swallowed whole
Enteric-coated tablets - Will be on the test
1) special coating over tablet to prevent the dissolution within the stomach.
2) these tablets are meant to dissolve in the intestines only.
3) should NEVER be chewed, broken or crushed prior to ingestion.
4) not to be taken with antacids which cause dissolution in the stomach
Sublingual tablets - Will be on the test
1) placed “under the tongue” where the active ingredient is quickly absorbed into the bloodstream
---absorption is not in the GI tract
2) only small amounts of drug are needed
3) avoids the “first pass” effect - this is where the drug circulates throughout the body before it is
broken down in the liver (metabolized)
Buccal tablets
1) “between cheek and gum”
2) drug is dissolved slowly over a period of time
Film-coated tablets - Will be on the test Biaxin and Depakote are examples.
1) special coating that masks the objectionable odor or taste
2) prevents deterioration due to light and air
Sustained, timed-release tablets
1) active ingredient is released at a constant rate for a prolonged period of time
2) “long-acting”, “delayed-release”, “prolonged-action”
Lozenges
1) “troches or pastilles”
2) meant to dissolve slowly in the mouth to keep the drug in contact with the mouth or throat longer
Pellets
1) cylinder shaped tablets for implantation just under the skin for continuous drug absorption
Capsules - Will be on the test
1) drug is enclosed within a gelatin shell.
2) after 10 to 30 minutes with the stomach, the gelatin capsule dissolves and the drug is released
3) eliminates bad tastes and odors of drugsapsules
Capsules - Will be on the test
1) drug is enclosed within a gelatin shell.
2) after 10 to 30 minutes with the stomach, the gelatin capsule dissolves and the drug is released
3) eliminates bad tastes and odors of drugs
Syrups
High concentrations of sugar hinders bacteria growth.
Examples: antibiotics, cough preparations
Solutions (Soln)
drug is uniformly dispersed throughout the liquid. (it doesn’t settle to the bottom)
Therefore there is no need for a shake well sticker. If you hold the liquid up to the light you will not see
any drug floating around. Example: Albuterol Solution
Suspensions (Susp)
The medication is insoluble in the liquid. (does not dissolve)
If you hold this liquid up to the light you will see little particles floating around and then settle.
These medications require a shake well sticker because the medication settles at the bottom and the
patient will not get the correct dose if not shaken.
Elixer
sweetened water with alcohol. If the medication is an elixir, it contains alcohol. Not for babies.
Tinctures
highest concentration of alcohol. This will be on the test.