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329 Cards in this Set

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abject
adjective
1 : sunk to or existing in a low state or condition <to lowest pitch of abject fortune thou art fallen -- John Milton>
2 a : cast down in spirit : SERVILE, SPIRITLESS <a man made abject by suffering> b : showing utter hopelessness or resignation <abject surrender>
3 : expressing or offered in a humble and often ingratiating spirit <abject flattery> <an abject apology
abrade
verb
Text: 1 to damage or diminish by continued friction <ropes abraded by the rocks were a huge danger to the climbers>
Synonyms chafe, erode, fray, fret, gall, rub, wear
Related Words file, gnaw, grate, graze, grind, nibble, rasp, sandblast, sandpaper, scour, scrape, scuff, shave; erase, reduce, rub out, wear out, wipe (away); bite, break down, break up, chew, corrode, decompose, disintegrate, dissolve, eat; hone, sharpen, whet
2 to make sore by continued rubbing <the prisoner's manacles abraded his wrists and ankles until they bled> -- see CHAFE 1
3 to damage by rubbing against a sharp or rough surface <the yacht's once-flawless wooden hull had been badly abraded by years of rough dockings> -- see SCRAPE 2
antedate
verb
Text: to go or come before in time <dinosaurs antedate cavemen by millions of years> -- see PRECEDE
apposite
Being of striking appropriateness and relevance; very applicable; apt.

As we survey Jewish history as a whole from the vantage point of the late twentieth century, Judah Halevi's phrase "prisoner of hope" seems entirely apposite. The prisoner of hope is sustained and encouraged by his hope, even as he is confined by it.
-- Jane S. Gerber (Editor), The Illustrated History of the Jewish People

Suppose, for example, that in a theoretical physics seminar we were to explain a very technical concept in quantum field theory by comparing it to the concept of aporia in Derridean literary theory. Our audience of physicists would wonder, quite reasonably, what is the goal of such a metaphor--whether or not it is apposite--apart from displaying our own erudition.
-- Alan D. Sokal and Jean Bricmont, Fashionable Nonsense: Postmodern Intellectuals' Abuse of Science
callow
Immature; lacking adult perception, experience, or judgment.

Those who in later years did me harm I describe as I knew them then, and I beg any reader to remember that, although I was hardly callow, I was not yet wise in the ways of the world.
-- Iain Pears, An Instance of the Fingerpost

George Black Jr was grateful that during his protracted courtship of Betty, his future father-in-law 'bore my callow unsophistication with benign indulgence'.
-- Richard Siklos, Shades of Black

They watched in awe as Revere, at first a callow and unambitious youth, began to develop into a serious young man dedicated to books and devoted to his father.
-- Sherwin B. Nuland, "The Saint", New Republic, December 13, 1999
commensurate
1. Equal in measure, extent, or duration.
2. Corresponding in size or degree or extent; proportionate.
3. Having a common measure; commensurable; reducible to a common measure; as, commensurate quantities.

A new era, Hoover called it, one that was witnessing breathtaking transformations in traditional ways of life and that demanded commensurate transformations in the institutions and techniques sof government.
-- David M. Kennedy, Freedom from Fear

It is almost a rule: the successful American--Vanderbilt, Frick, Rockefeller, Hearst, Gates--builds himself a house commensurate with his fortune.
-- Michael Knox Beran, The Last Patrician

The Shi'a represent a plurality in Lebanon, where only in recent years they have gained a degree of political power commensurate with their numbers.
-- Graham E. Fuller and Rend Rahim Francke, The Arab Shi'a: The Forgotten Muslims
compunction
1. Anxiety or deep unease proceeding from a sense of guilt or consciousness of causing pain.
2. A sting of conscience or a twinge of uneasiness; a qualm; a scruple.

Not only were tears one means of prayer, according to Benedict, they were the only pure form: "We must know that God regards our purity of heart and tears of compunction, not our many words."
-- Tom Lutz, Crying

Yet, while Louise and Ruth and I and all our ilk are consumed by self-reproach, these two can recall not an ounce of compunction.
-- Rose Shepherd, "Fatal egg by pleasure laid", Independent, September 3, 1996

If they succeeded, however, Sicily would simply come under the authority of the new revolutionary government in Naples, a government that would feel no compunctions whatsoever about saddling the island with even more "stamp duties, official papers, and forced labor" than before.
-- James Fentress, Rebels and Mafiosi

I would reveal all without compunction because he is after all, my ex.
-- Karen Karbo, Generation Ex
confound
Function: verb
Text: 1 to throw into a state of mental uncertainty <we were confounded by the unexpectedly difficult questions on the quiz> -- see CONFUSE 1
2 to throw into a state of self-conscious distress <his renewed popularity has confounded the critics who said his singing career was dead> -- see EMBARRASS 1
consummate
adj 1: having or revealing supreme mastery or skill; "a consummate artist"; "consummate skill"; "a masterful speaker"; "masterful technique"; "a masterly performance of the sonata"; "a virtuoso performance" [syn: masterful, masterly, virtuoso(a)] 2: perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities; "a complete gentleman"; "consummate happiness"; "a consummate performance" [syn: complete] 3: without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers; "an arrant fool"; "a complete coward"; "a consummate fool"; "a double-dyed villain"; "gross negligence"; "a perfect idiot"; "pure folly"; "what a sodding mess"; "stark staring mad"; "a thoroughgoing villain"; "utter nonsense"
contemn
To regard with utter contempt and disdain: despise, disdain, scorn, scout. Idioms: have no use for, look downonupon. See respect/contempt/standing.
controvert
to contradict or refute in an argument
contumacious
Obstinate; stubbornly disobedient; persistently, willfully, or overtly defiant of authority.

They solemnly denounced as contumacious . . . anyone opposing Dr Williams' appointment.
-- Stephen Bates, "Solemn, arcane and ceremonial, church confirms its liberal new archbishop", The Guardian, December 3, 2002

Not far north of Pech-Merle, just short of a little village named Cras, lies a later relic of human society: traces of the Gaulish enclosed settlement known as the oppidum of Murcens, claimed by some to be the site of Uxellodunum, where in 52 B.C. Julius Caesar defeated the great chieftain Vercingetorix and, to discourage further opposition by the contumacious Gauls, chopped off the right hands of 6,000 warriors, thus eliminating Gaulish resistance to the Pax Romana.
-- Peter Davison, "Province of the Past", The Atlantic, January 2001

Before a contumacious teenager can be turned into a disciplined, tradition-minded cadet, he or she must be admitted to West Point
-- Bill Kauffman, "The West Point Story", American Enterprise, July 199
cozen
cozen \KUZ-un\, transitive verb:
1. To cheat; to defraud; to deceive, usually by petty tricks.
2. To obtain by deceit.

intransitive verb:
1. To act deceitfully.

You would naturally not think so flat a rogue could cozen you. But have a care! These half idiots have a sort of cunning, as the skunk has its stench.
-- Robert Louis Stevenson, The Master of Ballantrae

The men who circle endlessly around her are mostly louts and losers. We watch them, at some length, as they drink, dope, cozen each other and tirelessly mistreat women.
-- Brad Leithauser, "Capturer of Hearts", New York Times, April 7, 1996

Pound, discussing Loy and Moore together, made a stab: "In the verses of Marianne Moore I detect traces of emotion; in that of Mina Loy I detect no emotion whatever." No, not absence of feeling; refusal, rather, to cozen her readers by appeal to feeling.
-- Hugh Kenner, "To Be the Brancusi of Poetry", New York Times, May 16, 1982

The rich man, argued Fox, is 'the greatest thief' because he acquired his wealth 'by cozening and cheating, by lying and defrauding'.
-- James Walvin, The Quakers

cozen
Function: verb
Text: 1 to cause to believe what is untrue <cozened several elderly ladies into believing that he was intending marriage> -- see DECEIVE
2 to rob by the use of trickery or threats <cozened scores of people by persuading them to hand over funds that he would "invest"> -- see FLEECE
defalcate

deaf AL kate
v : appropriate (as property entrusted to one's care) fraudulently to one's own use; "The accountant defalcated thousands of dollars while working for the wealthy family" [syn: embezzle, peculate, misappropriate, malversate
deign
1. To think worthy; to condescend -- followed by an infinitive.
2. To condescend to give or bestow; to stoop to furnish; to grant.

Not until I pour vodka on his shirt does he deign to acknowledge my existence.
-- Jay McInerney, Model Behavior

Maybe the President does not deign to read op-ed pages, but his speechwriters surely do.
-- William Safire, "The Wrong Way.", New York Times, June 14, 1999

Like most healthy, normal people (if you deign to categorize yourself that way), you are probably fraught with worry so intense these days you are sleeping standing up with your eyes open.
-- Lisa Napoli, "Every Little Thing's Gonna Be All Right!", New York Times, December 14, 1996
deprecate
1. [Archaic] To pray against, as an evil; to seek to avert by prayer.
2. To disapprove of strongly.
3. To belittle; to depreciate.

Although Stalin at times deprecated his cult, he also tolerated and perhaps covertly encouraged it.
-- Sheila Fitzpatrick, Everyday Stalinism

Copland humorously deprecated his looks, finding in his gaunt physique, narrow face, prominent nose, and buckteeth a comic resemblance to a giraffe.
-- Howard Pollack, Aaron Copland: The Life and Work of an Uncommon Man

We experience such augmentations as pleasure, which may be why aesthetic values have always been deprecated by social moralists, from Plato through our current campus Puritans.
-- Harold Bloom, How to Read and Why
descant
1. (Music) (a) A melody or counterpoint sung above the plain song of the tenor. (b) The upper voice in part music.
2. A discourse or discussion on a theme.

\DES-kant; des-KANT; dis-\, intransitive verb:
1. (a) To sing or play a descant. (b) To sing.
2. To comment freely; to discourse at length.

These to their nests,
Were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale;
She all night long her amorous descant sung.
-- John Milton, Paradise Lost

When they start on one of their polarised descants, whether on state education, water rates, crime, the BBC or whatever, they sound like a bumble bee and a wasp fighting in a jam jar.
-- Gillian Reynolds, "The biggest things to hit radio", Daily Telegraph, May 14, 1999

Mr. Ackroyd's descant on "Great Expectations" is the work of a master.
-- Alison Lurie, "Hanging Out With Hogarth", New York Times, October 11, 1992

In a custom associated with Athenian gatherings but almost certainly followed elsewhere as well, a myrtle branch was passed around the room, and each of the assembled would descant as the wine flowed.
-- David Barber, "Children of Orpheus", The Atlantic, June 10, 1998

The police amusingly descant on these jottings: "I can't believe he'd ever write a sentence like 'I shall be compelled to take steps to silence you!'"
-- Christopher Buckley, "The Chekhov of Coldsands-on-Sea", New York Times, November 16, 1997
detraction
Function: noun
Text: the act of making a person or a thing seem little or unimportant <her constant detraction of every new idea is annoying to the other club members> -- see DEPRECIATION

A derogatory or damaging comment on a person's character or reputation; disparagement: The candidate responded sharply to the long list of detractions concocted by his opponent.
discomfit
1. To make uneasy or perplexed, or to put into a state of embarrassment; to disconcert; to upset.
2. To thwart; to frustrate the plans of.
3. (Archaic). To defeat in battle.

A few of Dr. Baden's anecdotes ramble pointlessly, and his gusto in describing the anatomical characteristics of exhumed bodies may discomfit the squeamish.
-- Teresa Carpenter, "Death Is Just the Beginning", New York Times, June 25, 1989

But the business of paradox is to discomfit the mind and force truths into connections that cannot be thought.
-- Lore Segal, "A Passion for Polishness", New York Times, February 18, 1990

Starr Bright was used to the attention of strangers and would have been discomfited if no one noticed her, so leggy and glamorous.
-- Joyce Carol Oates, Starr Bright Will Be With You Soon

Why were the men so discomfited, and why, in a group renowned for its openness, was there so much difficulty in speaking frankly?
-- Hermione Lee, Virginia Woolf

Entry Word: discomfit
Function: verb
Text: to throw into a state of self-conscious distress <he was discomfited by the awkward situation of having his ex-girlfriend meet his current one> -- see EMBARRASS
dross
Waste or impure matter: discarded the dross after recycling the wood pulp.
The scum that forms on the surface of molten metal as a result of oxidation.
Worthless, commonplace, or trivial matter: “He was wide-awake and his mind worked clearly, purged of all dross” (Vladimir Nabokov).
detraction
The act of detracting or taking away.

A derogatory or damaging comment on a person's character or reputation; disparagement: The candidate responded sharply to the long list of detractions concocted by his opponent.
effontery
Insulting presumptuousness; shameless boldness; insolence.

Who would have the effrontery to treat the chairman in this way?
-- Tom King, The Operator

Passionately she sang of Yoshitsune, her love and yearning for him, and her joy that he had successfully managed to evade his evil half-brother Yoritomo. Yoritomo was torn between rage at such effrontery and pleasure at the exquisite beauty of her voice.
-- Lesley Downer, Women of the Pleasure Quarters
encomium
plural encomiums or encomia \-mee-uh\:
An often formal expression of warm or high praise.

He ended with an encomium about her "high integrity and simple humanity" which ensured that "she loved her country, and her country loved her."
-- David Cameron, "Mourning service", The Guardian, April 3, 2002

The giant throws the butler into the lake, whereupon Charles delivers the perfunctory encomium, "Wickham was a good servant."
-- Jeremy Treglown, Romancing: The Life and Work of Henry Green

He brought in the bread, cheese and beer, with many high encomiums upon their excellence.
-- Charles Dickens, The Old Curiosity Shop
enervate
1. To deprive of vigor, force, or strength; to render feeble; to weaken.
2. To reduce the moral or mental vigor of.

Beatriz de Ahumada soldiered on to produce nine more children, a tour of duty that left her enervated and worn.
-- Cathleen Medwick, Teresa of Avila: The Progress of a Soul

In countries like India, Pakistan, Indonesia, Nigeria and Ghana I have always felt enervated by the slightest physical or mental exertion, whereas in the UK, France, Germany or the US I have always felt reinforced and stimulated by the temperate climate, not only during long stays, but even during brief travels.
-- David S. Landes, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations

The tendency of abstract thought . . . to enervate the will is one of the real dangers of the highest education.
-- Mark Pattison, Suggestions on Academical Organisation

The conquerors were enervated by luxury.
-- Edward Gibbon, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
engender
1 : BEGET, PROCREATE
2 : to cause to exist or to develop : PRODUCE <angry words engender strife>
intransitive senses : to assume form : ORIGINATE

“Every cloud engenders not a storm” (Shakespeare).
episodic
intermittent
execrate
1 to declare to be morally wrong or evil <the President execrated the terrorists responsible for the bomb blast> -- see CONDEMN 1
2 to dislike strongly <execrated anyone who would physically abuse children or animals> -- see HATE
factious
1. Given to faction; addicted to form parties and raise dissensions, in opposition to government or the common good; turbulent; seditious; prone to clamor against public measures or men; -- said of persons.
2. Pertaining to faction; proceeding from faction; indicating, or characterized by, faction; -- said of acts or expressions; as, factious quarrels.

Despite Washington's considerable leverage with the ethnic Albanians, it was unclear whether the province's factious leadership understood the message.
-- Danica Kirka, "Rubin to Kosovars: Avoid Violence", Los Angeles Times, March 14, 2000

Many nobles sought good government, rather than being factious, and were only forced into war by the king's incompetence.
-- "Cade's Rebellion, History of United Kingdom,", Encyclopedia Britannica

Nearly four months after the independent counsel, Kenneth Starr, delivered his report of possible impeachable offenses to the House, the Judiciary Committee will launch the final chapter of its factious inquiry this week, debating the merits of impeachment before taking its vote.
-- Lizette Alvarez, "Republicans Offer Clinton Lawyers 2 Days for Defense", New York Times, December 7, 1998
fulminate
to talk loudly and wildly <was embarrassed when her dad began fulminating at the restaurant about what's wrong with today's kids> -- see RANT
fulsome
1. Offensive to the taste or sensibilities.
2. Insincere or excessively lavish; especially, offensive from excess of praise.

He recorded the event in his journal: "Long evening visit from Mr. Langtree--a fulsome flatterer."
-- Edward L. Widmer, Young America: The Flowering of Democracy in New York City

Concealed disgust under the appearance of fulsome endearment.
-- Oliver Goldsmith, The Citizen of the World
germane
Appropriate or fitting; relevant.

The issue is not germane to the present discussion.
-- Richard Wollheim, On the Emotions

As long as the argument remains germane, he listens attentively, putting on and removing heavy tortoise-shell glasses and leaning across the bench.
-- Philip Hamburger, Matters of State

In times of catastrophe we allow public officials to declare "states of emergency" that replace some normal rules . . . with a more germane set.
-- Seth Shulman, "Owning the Future: In Africa, Patents Kill", Technology Review, April 2001

I have many secrets, most of which are not at all germane to the topic . . . and would probably be completely inappropriate to tell.
-- David Gewirtz, "I Have a Secret", PalmPower Magazine, August 2000
harangue
1. A speech addressed to a large public assembly.
2. A noisy or pompous speech; a rant
hector
. A bully.

transitive verb:
1. To intimidate or harass in a blustering way; to bully.

intransitive verb:
1. To play the bully; to bluster.


At both ends of the escalators, attendants . . . hector and berate any passenger who steps out of line.
-- Jeffrey Tayler, "A Means of Transport", The Atlantic, February 1998

. . .salespersons who glom onto you and relentlessly hector you until you buy a service agreement.
-- Dave Barry, "Service Calls", Washington Post, September 2, 2001

hector
verb
Text: to make timid or fearful by or as if by threats <the children used to constantly hector the poor dog, and now he growls at everybody> -- see INTIMIDATE
imprecation

im prih cay tion
1. The act of imprecating, or invoking evil upon someone.
2. A curse.

After a while, he stopped hurling imprecations . . . and, as he often did after such an outburst, became quite remorseful.
-- Wayne Johnston, The Colony of Unrequited Dreams

Would he criticize an erring colleague? "I shall," Dirksen would promise, in a voice like the finest whiskey aged in fog, "invoke upon him every condign imprecation."
-- Lance Morrow, "We Lose a Great Speaker, We Gain a Great Book", Time, May 24, 2000
impudent
Function: adjective
Text: displaying or marked by rude boldness <the guest's impudent inquiries about the cost of just about everything we had in the house> -- see NERVY 1
impugn

im pune
To attack by words or arguments; to call in question; to make insinuations against; to oppose or challenge as false; to gainsay.

As might be expected of fanatical flag idolaters, the GAR did not accept refusals lightly, and in one instance in Illinois impugned the patriotic loyalty of recalcitrant local school administrators by spreading rumors that one of them was a foreign alien yet to be naturalized and the other a draft dodger who evaded Civil War service by fleeing to Canada.
-- Albert Boime, The Unveiling of the National Icons

After hearing that her brother had been impugned by his political rivals, she also wrote a verse defense of his honor, entitled "Lines on reading an attack upon the political career of the late Albert Baker Esqr."
-- Caroline Fraser, God's Perfect Child

Still, I was unpleasantly surprised when, in the morning, several of my coworkers took it upon themselves to crassly impugn G.B.'s capacity for leadership.
-- Lydia Millet, George Bush, Dark Prince of Love

Even though it is nowhere alleged that disclosures of sinful activity by priests impugn the integrity of the entire ministry, that nevertheless is the passing legacy of the current scandals.
-- William F. Buckley Jr., "The House of Disillusion", National Review, May 14, 2002
ineffable
1. Incapable of being expressed in words; unspeakable; unutterable; indescribable.
2. Not to be uttered; taboo.

. . .the tension inherent in human language when it attempts to relate the ineffable, see the invisible, understand the incomprehensible.
-- Jeffrey Burton Russell, A History of Heaven

Pope John Paul II notes that people are drawn to religion to answer the really big questions--for example, "What is the ultimate ineffable mystery which is the origin and destiny of our existence?"
-- William A. Sherden, The Fortune Sellers

One cannot blame them very much; explaining the ineffable is difficult.
-- Edward O. Wilson, "The Biological Basis of Morality", The Atlantic, April 1998
ingratiate
= to gain favor or favorable acceptance for by deliberate effort -- usually used with with <ingratiate themselves with the community leaders -- William Attwood>
interdict
Function: noun
Text: an order that something not be done or used <the church issued an interdict on the use of birth control devices> -- see PROHIBITION 2

To confront and halt the activities, advance, or entry of: “the role of the FBI in interdicting spies attempting to pass US secrets to the Soviet Union” (Christian Science Monitor).
inveterate
Function: adjective
Text: 1 firmly established over time <he has an inveterate tendency to tell tall tales that began when he was just a little boy>
Synonyms confirmed, deep-rooted, deep-seated, entrenched (also intrenched), hard-core, rooted, settled
Related Words fixed, immutable, set; implanted, inculcated, instilled; inborn, inbred, inherent, innate, natural; accustomed, chronic, customary, habitual, regular, typical, usual; abiding, enduring, lifelong, persistent, persisting
Near Antonyms brief, ephemeral, fleeting, impermanent, momentary, short-lived, temporary, transient
2 being such by habit and not likely to change <the man is an inveterate liar who only rarely tells the truth> -- see HABITUAL 1
largess
1. Generous giving (as of gifts or money), often accompanied by condescension.
2. Gifts, money, or other valuables so given.
3. Generosity; liberality.

Four years after her marriage she exclaimed giddily over her father-in-law's largess: "He has given Waldorf the Waldorf Astoria Hotel for a birthday present!"
-- Stacy Schiff, "Otherwise Engaged", New York Times, March 19, 2000

The recipients of Johnson's largesse were understandably indifferent to what propelled him.
-- Robert Dallek, Flawed Giant: Lyndon Johnson and His Times, 1961-1973

A swelling chorus has arisen recently to complain that the PRI has been up to its old tricks, showering voters with largesse (ranging from washing machines to bicycles and cash).
-- "Mexico's vote", Economist, June 24, 2000
lassitude
Lack of vitality or energy; weariness; listlessness.

The feverish excitement . . . had given place to a dull, regretful lassitude.
-- George Eliot, Romola

A long exercise of the mental powers induces a remarkable lassitude of the whole body.
-- Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful

She felt aged, in deep lassitude and numb despair, and regretted not marrying Mai Dong before he left for the front.
-- Ha Jin, Waiting
machinations
a scheming or crafty action or artful design intended to accomplish some usually evil end <backstage machinations and power plays that have dominated the film industry -- Peter Bogdanovich>
nettle
verb
Text: to disturb the peace of mind of (someone) especially by repeated disagreeable acts <don't nettle your brother while he's trying to do his homework> -- see IRRITATE
obliquy

ah blih quee
1. Strongly condemnatory or abusive language or utterance.
2. The condition of disgrace suffered as a result of public blame, abuse, or condemnation; ill repute.

There he remained, weeping indignantly at her stream of obloquy, bitterly ashamed of his tears, until it was time for supper.
-- Jonathan Keates, Stendhal

Once installed in office he earned near-universal obloquy by pushing through the biggest tax increase in the state's history.
-- Dan Seligman, "The Taxophiliacs", Forbes, February 5, 2001

For Britain to have made a last imperial stand on the shores of the South China Sea would have risked local calamity and international obloquy.
-- Christopher Patten, East and West
paen
n 1: a formal expression of praise [syn: encomium, eulogy, panegyric, pean] 2: (ancient Greece) a hymn of praise (especially one sung in ancient Greece to invoke or thank a deity) [syn: pean]
parsimony
Function: noun
Text: the quality of being overly sparing with money <her parsimony was so extreme that she'd walk five miles to the store to save a few cents on gas>
perdition
n : (Christianity) the abode of Satan and the forces of evil; where sinners suffer eternal punishment; "Hurl'd headlong...To bottomless perdition, there to dwell"- John Milton; "a demon from the depths of the pit" [syn: Hell, Inferno, infernal region, nether region, the pit]
perfidy
The act of violating faith or allegiance; violation of a promise or vow; faithlessness; treachery.

Having just fought a war to get rid of a king, the framers had "the perfidy of the chief magistrate" clearly in their sights when they included broad grounds for impeachment.
-- Ann H. Coulter, High Crimes and Misdemeanors

To ordinary Algerians, the news that chemical tests did not end until 1978 was renewed proof of the hypocrisy and perfidy of the military who have misruled them since independence in 1962.
-- "Bombshell that rocked generals in Algeria", Irish Times, October 25, 1997

Soon Esther has fallen desolately into the arms of her girlfriend,seeking advice and reassurance about the perfidy of men.
-- Janet Maslin, "Rendezvous in Paris", New York Times, August 9, 1996
peregrinate
v : travel around, through, or over, especially on foot; "peregrinate the bridge"

Entry Word: peregrinate
Function: verb
Text: to take a trip especially of some distance <a couple of backpacking college students who decided to spend the summer peregrinating around Ireland> -- see TRAVEL 1 (pear-ih-granATE)
peripatetic
1. Of or pertaining to walking about or traveling from place to place; itinerant.
2. Of or pertaining to the philosophy taught by Aristotle (who gave his instructions while walking in the Lyceum at Athens), or to his followers.

noun:
1. One who walks about; a pedestrian; an itinerant.
2. A follower of Aristotle; an Aristotelian.

Nevertheless, the attachment which in later life he developed towards Charleston suggests that his peripatetic childhood had left unsatisfied his need for a permanent home.
-- Frances Spalding, Duncan Grant: A Biography

I was born in Italy, my sister on the west coast of Canada, because my father was pursuing a peripatetic career as an artist.
-- Anna Shapiro, USA Today, July 13, 2000

He would have a long way to go before he would match his peripatetic father. Nick had now moved five times and lived in four states from Kentucky to California.
-- Allen Barra, Inventing Wyatt Earp

traveling from place to place <a peripatetic vegetable seller> -- see ITINERANT

(parapetetic)
petulant
adjective
Text: easily irritated or annoyed <a petulant and fussy man who blamed everyone for his problems> -- see IRRITABLE
pithy
Function: adjective
Text: marked by the use of few words to convey much information or meaning <a fairly pithy criticism about the excessive length of the book> -- see CONCISE
precipitate
To throw from or as if from a great height; hurl downward: “The finest bridge in all Peru broke and precipitated five travelers into the gulf below” (Thornton Wilder).
To cause to happen, especially suddenly or prematurely. See synonyms at speed.
Meteorology. To cause (water vapor) to condense and fall from the air as rain, snow, sleet, or hail.
Chemistry. To cause (a solid substance) to be separated from a solution
adj. (-tĭt)

Moving rapidly and heedlessly; speeding headlong.
Acting with or marked by excessive haste and lack of due deliberation. See synonyms at impetuous, reckless.
Occurring suddenly or unexpectedly.
Entry Word: precipitate
Function: adjective
Text: acting or done with excessive or careless speed <the army's precipitate withdrawal from the field of battle> -- see HASTY 1
prescience
prescience \PREE-shuns; PREE-shee-uns; PRESH-uns; PRESH-ee-uns; PREE-see-uns; PRES-ee-uns\, (preh she ence) noun:
Knowledge of events before they take place; foresight.
--prescient adjective

But you could not fault his prescience in 1980 when he [Arthur Seldon] wrote: "China will go capitalist. Soviet Russia will not survive the century. Labour as we know it will never rule again. Socialism is an irrelevance."
-- "Prophet of privatisation puts money on Major - well, £2.50 of it", Electronic Telegraph, March 28, 1997

Critics and historians have written admiringly of Dostoyevsky's acuity at forecasting the nature of the political turmoil that would envelop Russia over the next 100 years; Ms. Egloff, too, pays homage to the novelist's prescience.
-- "Plotters and Snoops in Old Russia", New York Times, May 23, 1998

As a professor, he earned a reputation for prescience when he returned an examination to a student named John Grisham with the comment, "Although you missed most of the legal issues, you have a real talent for fiction."
-- "The Final Refrains of 'Dixie'", New York Times, November 11, 1998
proclivity
Function: noun
Text: a habitual attraction to some activity or thing <showed artistic proclivities at an early age> -- see INCLINATION 1
profligate
1. Openly and shamelessly immoral; dissipated; dissolute.
2. Recklessly wasteful.

noun:
1. A profligate person.

Both Curtiss and Feldmar agreed that after the birth of Bruno the couple grew less happy and that there was a good deal of squabbling caused, apparently, by the father's profligate ways and infidelities.
-- Arthur Lennig, Stroheim

Life had to be challenged, attacked every instant, with reckless speed in a Ferrari, with profligate spending, with unrestrained sexuality, with artistic ambitions as monumental as they were impractical.
-- Tag Gallagher, The Adventures of Roberto Rossellini

For in so many ways we seem at times to be "a nation of public puritans and private profligates."
-- Tracy Lee Simmons, "Steinbeck Reconsidered", National Review, March 25, 2002

If this were not the case, we would all end up as either misers or profligates.
-- "What matters, what doesn't?", Investors Chronicle, May 2, 20
promulgate
prah mul gate
promulgate
verb
Text: to make known openly or publicly <the encyclical that promulgated the church's position on artificial birth control> -- see ANNOUNCE
proclivity
Function: noun
Text: a habitual attraction to some activity or thing <showed artistic proclivities at an early age> -- see INCLINATION 1
profligate

Prah fli get
1. Openly and shamelessly immoral; dissipated; dissolute.
2. Recklessly wasteful.

noun:
1. A profligate person.

Both Curtiss and Feldmar agreed that after the birth of Bruno the couple grew less happy and that there was a good deal of squabbling caused, apparently, by the father's profligate ways and infidelities.
-- Arthur Lennig, Stroheim

Life had to be challenged, attacked every instant, with reckless speed in a Ferrari, with profligate spending, with unrestrained sexuality, with artistic ambitions as monumental as they were impractical.
-- Tag Gallagher, The Adventures of Roberto Rossellini

For in so many ways we seem at times to be "a nation of public puritans and private profligates."
-- Tracy Lee Simmons, "Steinbeck Reconsidered", National Review, March 25, 2002

If this were not the case, we would all end up as either misers or profligates.
-- "What matters, what doesn't?", Investors Chronicle, May 2, 20
promulgate
promulgate
verb
Text: to make known openly or publicly <the encyclical that promulgated the church's position on artificial birth control> -- see ANNOUNCE
redress
redress \rih-DRES\, transitive verb:
1. To put in order again; to set right; to emend; to revise.
2. To set right, as a wrong; to repair, as an injury; to make amends for; to remedy; to relieve from.
3. To make amends or compensation to; to relieve of anything unjust or oppressive; to bestow relief upon.

noun:
1. The act of redressing; a making right; reformation; correction; amendment.
2. A setting right, as of wrong, injury, or oppression; as, the redress of grievances; hence, relief; remedy; reparation; indemnification.

Before adjourning in October 1774, the First Continental Congress called for the convening of another congress at Philadelphia on May 10, 1775, only if Britain had not redressed the Americans' grievances.
-- Pauline Maier, American Scripture :Making the Declaration of Independence

Many are convicts seeking redress; and with the rise of violent crime in the 1970s, powerful people sought to prevent their finding it.
-- William S. Mcfeely, Proximity to Death

Others, summarily replaced at the whim of a powerful artist or agent, are warned that their careers will be throttled if they seek legal or public redress.
-- Norman Lebrecht, Who Killed Classical Music? : Maestros, Managers, and Corporate Politics

redress
noun
Text: payment to another for a loss or injury <the skis were certainly an adequate redress for the lost snowboard> -- see COMPENSATION 1
reparation
reparation
Function: noun
Text: payment to another for a loss or injury <the government instituted a program of reparations to the descendants of Native Americans who were driven from their land> -- see COMPENSATION
restitution
restitution
noun
Text: payment to another for a loss or injury <sought restitution from the other driver's insurance company for lost wages> -- see COMPENSATION 1
sedulity
Persevering and constant in effort or application; sedulous activity (sedoolity)
sententious
Pronunciation: sen-ten tchous
Function: adjective
1 a : given to or abounding in aphoristic expression b : given to or abounding in excessive moralizing
2 : terse, aphoristic, or moralistic in expression : PITHY, EPIGRAMMATIC
slovenly
Function: adjective
Text: lacking neatness in dress or person <for the sake of their image, the band members transformed themselves from clean-cut lads to slovenly rockers> -- see SLOPPY

Slovenly = unkept, sloppy
subsume
to include or place within something larger or more comprehensive : encompass as a subordinate or component element <red, green, and yellow are subsumed under the term "color">
vapid
1. Lacking liveliness and spirit; unanimated; spiritless; dull; as, "a vapid speech."
2. Flavorless; lacking taste or zest; flat; as, "vapid beer."

One year he was writing vapid and sentimental mediocrities, and the next he was turning out one of the best poems of our century.
-- Anatole Broyard, New York Times

Especially in his coverage of the first 800 years of Russian architecture, he resorts to a prose of vapid enthusiasms; too many buildings are described like this, about a country palace: "a breathtaking masterpiece that fairly shimmered with Baroque splendor."
-- Richard Lourie, "Firebrands and Firebirds", New York Times, April 5, 1998

The rest consisted of vapid anecdotes that revealed nothing but her own alleged caring, bromides that said nothing an ad agency couldn't tell you.
-- Andrew Sullivan, "One Last Time", New Republic, August 28, 2000
torpid
1. Having lost motion or the power of exertion and feeling; numb; benumbed.
2. Dormant; hibernating or estivating.
3. Dull; sluggish; apathetic.

Canary Islanders are citizens of Spain, but geography asserts itself from time to time, as a reminder that this land will always be Africa's: the trade winds get interrupted by strong gusts from the east that bring hot dust and sometimes even torpid, wind-buffeted locusts.
-- Barbara Kingsolver, "Where the Map Stopped", New York Times, May 17, 1992

For more than twenty years--all my adult life--I have lived here: my great weight sunk, torpid in the heat, into this sagged chair on my rooftop patio.
-- Peggy Payne, Sister India

Some animals became torpid in winter, others were torpid in summer.
-- Ralph Waldo Emerson, The Conduct of Life

The debacle over signatures has roused the normally politically torpid Mayor, who dislikes pressing the flesh.
-- Jan Cienski, "Petition bungle robs Mayor of spot on ballot", National Post, July 30, 2002

It is a man's own fault . . . if his mind grows torpid in old age.
-- Samuel Johnson, quoted in James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson, Life of Samuel Johnson
votary
. One who is devoted, given, or addicted to some particular pursuit, subject, study, or way of life.
2. A devoted admirer.
3. A devout adherent of a religion or cult.
4. A dedicated believer or advocate.

When she held out her hand to receive the glass, she had more the air of a full-grown Bacchante, celebrating the rites of Bacchus, than a votary at the shrine of Hygeia.
-- Pamela Neville-Sington, Fanny Trollope

Perhaps most amazingly, votaries of "diversity" insist on absolute conformity.
-- Tony Snow, "Lifestyle police: Enough already", USA Today, June 10, 1996

It must be remembered that undisguised atrocities on a stupendous scale. . . would be too strong for the stomach of even the most brutalized people, and would tend to bring war into discredit with all but its monomaniac votaries.
-- "The Idea of a League of Nations", The Atlantic, February 1919
winnow
To separate the chaff from (grain) by means of a current of air.

To rid of undesirable parts.


To blow (chaff) off or away.


To blow away; scatter.



To blow on; fan:

a breeze winnowing the tall grass.




To examine closely in order to separate the g

ood from the bad; sift.



To separate or get rid of (an undesirable part); eliminate:

winnowing out the errors in logic.


To sort or select (a desirable part); extract.
wizened
adjective:
Dried; shriveled; withered; shrunken; as, "a wizened old man."


Her eyes were clear and shining, full of love, and set deeply in the creases of her

wizened face.
-- Catherine Whitney,


The Calling


At five foot six, 130 pounds, Erdos had the

wizened, cadaverous look of a drug addict, but friends insist he was frail and gaunt long before he started taking amphetamines.
-- Paul Hoffman,


The Man Who Loved

Only Numbers


A thorny bramble bearing

wizened leaves grew with the bittersweet in a crevice that ran downhill from the duo of trees.
-- Mary Parker Buckles,
Synonyms INFANT : BABY GROWN-UP : ??
Antonyms BIG : SMALL FULL : ??
Part to Whole WHEEL : CAR BRANCH : ??
Cause to Effect SLIVER : PAIN HEAT : ??
Matters of Degree WARM : HOT COOL : ??
Object to Function TRUCK : TRANSPORT OVEN : ??
Member to Category APPLE : FRUIT CARROT : ??
Synonyms INFANT : BABY GROWN-UP : ??
Antonyms BIG : SMALL FULL : ??
Part to Whole WHEEL : CAR BRANCH : ??
Cause to Effect SLIVER : PAIN HEAT : ??
Matters of Degree WARM : HOT COOL : ??
Object to Function TRUCK : TRANSPORT OVEN : ??
Member to Category APPLE : FRUIT CARROT : ??
LICENTIOUS
lacks morality
coup
highly sucessful action or sudden attack


?extralegal form of an election
iconoclast
iconoclast is someone who disdains or rejects tradition. In much the same way, an anarchist is someone who disdains or rejects government.
divisive
Creating, or tending to create, separation, or difference.
Tensions between the brains and the jocks at Riverside High were heightened when some teachers made divisive remarks suggesting that the jocks were not being penalized for their poor academic records.
facetious
Joking, witty -- especially at an inappropriate time.
WANTON
Unrestrained, loose and free; reckless and heedless
effulgent (adj)
Diffusing a flood of light; shining; luminous; beaming; bright; splendid..
nadir (noun)
The lowest point, directly opposite to the zenith.. Here is an example of it in use:


The nadir of Solomon's depression was the week he not only did not leave the house, but could not bring himself to shower or change out of his pajamas.
ULTERIOR
Farther away, not central; hidden, going beyond what is said openly.
invidious (adj)
Worthy of envy; desirable; likely to produce ill will..
gentrification (noun)
The improvement of standing; the remodelling (as of a neighborhood) to make it more affluent..
WRENCH
to twist or force with violence
BUNGLE:
To act or work in a clumsy, awkward manner.
exacerbate
to make worse
promulgate (verb)
To publish; declare; proclaim; make known by open declaration..
corpulent (adj)
Very fat; obese.. Here is an example of it in use:


Gwynneth Paltrow donned a fat suit to play the corpulent love interest in "Shallow Hal."
pugilist (noun)
Boxer, fighter
DISCOMFIT:
Upset, frustrate, make uncomfortable
DISENCUMBER
remove an impediment, free from a burden
inveigh (verb)
to complain or criticize strongly
inveigh (verb)
To complain or criticize strongly..
assiduous
Performed with constant diligence or attention; unremitting; persistent..
BANAL
Commonplace; trivial; hackneyed; trite
ignominious (adj)
Dishonorable; shameful
dilettante (noun)
An admirer or lover of the fine arts - especially one who follows an art or a branch of knowledge for amusement only; popularly, an amateur..
regale (verb)
Entertain sumptuously, delight, provide amusement..
INCITE:
To move to action; to stir up; to rouse; to spur or urge on.
abrogate (verb)
To repeal, as in a law; to annul something through an authoritative act..
maculated (adj)
Having spots or blotches
abnegation (noun)
a denial, a reununciation
abnegation (noun)
a denial, a reununciation
abnegation (noun)
a denial, a reununciation
assuge
to calm or pacify
codify (verb
To reduce to a formal system; to organize or structure, as laws.. Here is an example of it in use:


The anthropologist tried to codify the tribe's unwritten rules in an attempt to understand how the system of justice worked.
retrench (verb)
to cut off, to pare away
QUAY
A bank or wharf jutting into water from which boats may be loaded and unloaded.
AUTOCRAT
person who rules with absolute power
hoi polloi (noun)
Common people, general populace..
MERCENARY
A soldier for hire who fights purely for money (not from patriotism or coersion).
PROPENSITY
bias, bent, tendency
pastiche (noun)
A composition made up of bits from various sources..
intransigent (adj)
Refusing compromise; irreconcilable..
imperious
Commanding; domineering or arrogant; urgent, imperative..
Avarice (noun)
Greediness after wealth; covetousness; an excessive desire of gain.. Here is an example of it in use:


Beattie stated that "To desire money for its own sake, and in order to hoard it up, is avarice."
obstreperous (adj)
Clamorous; noisy; unruly - especially in raising opposition..
LANGUID
Drooping or flagging from exhaustion; weak; without animation.
recondite
Learned, profound and difficult to understand, abstruse..
RESCIND
To repeal or take back (especially a decree or law)..
LEVITY
Inappropriately funny behavior.
PARADOX
A statement that appears to be self-contradictory (but might in fact be true).
gentrification
The improvement of standing; the remodelling (as of a neighborhood) to make it more affluent.
ASSIDUOUS
Performed with constant diligence or attention; unremitting; persistent.
retrench (verb)
To cut off; to pare away
animus (noun)
Aggression or hostility.
hearsay (noun)
Rumor; fame; common talk heard from another.
Nothing she had heard about the new neighbor made Maki expect to like him, but she didn't want to base her opinion entirely on hearsay, and waited until they met before passing judgment.
abnegation (noun)
A denial; a renunciation
elliptical (adj)
Having a part omitted; having the form of an oval.
characterized by extreme economy of expression or omission of superfluous elements; "the dialogue is elliptic and full of dark hints"; "the explanation was concise, even elliptical to the verge of obscurity"- H.O.Taylor [syn: elliptic]
ANTIPATHY
Strong dislike, or hate.
Avarice (noun)
Greediness after wealth; covetousness; an excessive desire of gain.
two words for faithful follower
votary
ideologue
chary (adj)
Cautious, wary, hesitant. Slow to accept or allow.
disconsolate (adj)
Deeply dejected and dispirited; hopelessly sad; comfortless.
TURNCOAT:
One who forsakes his party or his principles; a traitor or apostate.
excoriation (noun)
Severe criticism
FUNCTIONARY
One charged with the performance of a position or office.
DEMAGOGUE:
Someone who appeals to the prejudices and emotions of the people in an attempt to gain power.
invective (noun)
Abusive, insulting language..
OBSTREPEROUS
Clamorous; noisy; unruly - especially in raising opposition.
duplicity (noun
Deceitfulness in speech or conduct, double-dealing..
ATTENUATE:
To lessen the amount, force, or value of; to make less complex; to weaken.
dissipate (verb)
To scatter completely; to disperse and cause to disappear.
talisman (noun)
Figure superstitiously believed to bring wonderful effects..
pedantic (adj)
Displaying or showing off trivial knowledge; overly concerned with technicalities and rules.. Here is an example of it in use:


She didn't realize how pedantic he was until she asked him a simple question and he offered her a 15 minute lecture in response..
epigram (noun)
A witty or sharp thought expressed briefly, often in verse..
FORMALITY:
A social custom, rule or ceremony; the observance of these.
ethos (noun)
The views, perspectives and habits of an individual or group..
ethos
The views, perspectives and habits of an individual or group..
BUTTRESS
To support or strengthen.
ABSOLVE
To release from obligation, debt or guilt
DEMAGOGUE
Someone who appeals to the prejudices and emotions of the people in an attempt to gain power.
ferment (noun)
Heat; tumult; agitation
ferment
Heat; tumult; agitationa state of agitation or
turbulent change or development; "the political ferment produced a new leadership";
ATTENUATE
To lessen the amount, force, or value of; to make less complex; to weaken.
hamper (Verb)
To frustrate or impede; to prevent from moving freely.. Here is an example of it in use:


She struggled as she swam across the river; the long weeds tangled around her legs and hampered her movement
stoke (verb)
To poke or stir up, as a fire
avarice (noun)
An excessive or inordinate desire of gain; greediness after wealth..
INVETERATE
Deep-seated or firmly established.
CHARY
Cautious, wary, hesitant. Slow to accept or allow.
intransigent (adj)
Refusing compromise; irreconcilable..
derisive vs. divisive
The definition of derisive (adj) is Mocking, laughing; dismissive..

The definition of divisive is
divisive

adj : dissenting (especially dissenting with the majority opinion) [syn: dissentious, factious]
theocracy
aristocracy
plutocracy
The definition of theocracy (noun) is Government by religious officials..

aristocrac= A hereditary ruling class; nobility.
Government by a ruling class.

plutocracy
n : a political system governed by the wealthy people
unequivocal (adj)
unambigouos, not doubtful
baleful
Menacing, portending evil; having a harmful or malignant influence..
baleful
Menacing, portending evil; having a harmful or malignant influence..
vagary (noun)
A whim; a wandering of the thoughts..
desultory (adj)
Jumping, or passing, from one thing or subject to another, without order or rational connection; without logical sequence; disconnected.. Here is an example of it in use:


The lawyer's closing argument should have been organized and structured, rather than the desultory and rambling remarks that failed to convince the jury of his client's innocence.
myopic (adj)
Nearsighted
vulpine (adj)
Resembling the fox; cunning; crafty; artful..
cognate (adj)
Of the same or a similar nature; of the same family; proceeding from the same stock or root..
TROTH:
Belief; faith; fidelity; truth
sagacity (noun)
wisdom
REPUDIATE
To cast off, to refuse to have anything to do with
FAWN
Show affection; curry favor with flattery and sycophancy.
excoriate
to criticize severely
bilious (adj)
Ill-tempered
venal (adj)
Capable of being bought; corrupt..
fulsome (adj)
Offending or disgusting by overfullness, excess, or grossness; cloying..
sundry (adj)
Various; miscellaneous
frond (noun)
A leaf of a fern or a palm tree
PRAGMATIC
Concerned with the practical as opposed to the theoretical.
vituperative (adj)
Containing, or characterized by, abuse; scolding..
apostate (noun)
One who has forsaken the faith, principles, or party, to which he previously adhered..
ASPERITY
Harshness, roughness of temper
auspice (noun)
Patronage, assistance or protection (often given by a large entity to a smaller one); a sign or omen (as in prophecy)..
sententious (adj)
Full of meaning, terse and energetic in expression..
sen·ten·tious
Terse and energetic in expression; pithy.

Abounding in aphorisms.
Given to aphoristic utterances.

Abounding in pompous moralizing.
Given to pompous moralizing
preponderance (noun)
A great amount (of something. Could refer to weight, quantity, power, influence, etc.).
MELLIFLUOUS:
Smooth; flowing sweetly
suppliant (adj)
Asking earnestly and submissively; entreating..
temper
To make more moderate, soften, dilute.. Here is an example of it in use:


It is best to temper criticism with at least some praise, to point out some good alongside the bad.
parsimonious
Economical and efficient, spending very little..
ENJOIN:
To give an injunction to; to direct with authority; to order
belie (verb)
Show the falsity of something by providing contradictory information..
belie (verb)
Show the falsity of something by providing contradictory information..
ABORIGINE
A native; the first known inhabitant of a region..
COMPATRIOT
One of the same country; having like interests and feeling.
ABNEGATION
A denial; a renunciation
portent (noun)
An omen, a harbinger, a sign of something that is yet to happen.. Here is an example of it in use:


When the water mysteriously drained out of her aquarium one afternoon, the young woman took it as a portent warning her not to go on the fishing expedition she had been planning
WAGGISH:
Mischievous in sport; frolicsome
COUNTERVAIL:
Act in opposition, counteract (often against a harmful force); compensate, offset, counterbalance.
disallow (Verb)
Prohibit, reject, refuse to admit.. Here is an example of it in use:


The football team's fans were incensed when the referee disallowed the game-winning touchdown.
upshot (noun)
Final issue; conclusion; the end result..
VENDETTA
blood feud; private revenge for the murder of a kinsman..
regale (verb)
Entertain sumptuously, delight, provide amusement..
insipid (adj)
Uninteresting; weak; vapid; lacking taste or flavor..
sophistry (noun)
Fallacious reasoning; reasoning sound in appearance only..
tutelage (noun
The act of guarding or protecting; guardianship..
difference between sagacity and sanguine
sagacity = wisdom
sanguine = cheerfully optimistic
canon (noun
A collection of books determined to be authoritative; a law or rule.. Here is an example of it in use:


The rabbis of the early second century set out the Biblical canon; as a group they determined which books would be included in the Bible and which wouldn't.
bellicose vs. belligerent
The definition of bellicose (adj) is Inclined to war or contention; warlike; pugnacious..

Synonyms: belligerent, bellicose, pugnacious, contentious, quarrelsome
These adjectives mean having or showing an eagerness to fight. Belligerent refers to a tendency to hostile behavior: A belligerent reporter badgered the politician. Bellicose and pugnacious suggest a natural disposition to fight: “All successful newspapers are ceaselessly querulous and bellicose” (H.L. Mencken). A good litigator needs a pugnacious intellect. Contentious implies chronic argumentativeness: “His style has been described variously as abrasive and contentious, overbearing and pompous” (Victor Merina). Quarrelsome suggests bad temper and a perverse readiness to bicker: “The men gave him much room, for he was notorious as a quarrelsome person when drunk” (Stephen Crane).
HARANGUE
A loud or pompous speech addressed to a large public assembly
cannon
collection of books determined to be authoritative; a law or rule.
Here is an example of it in use:



The rabbis of the early second century set out the Biblical canon; as a group they determined which books would be included in the Bible and which wouldn't.
vendetta
A blood feud; private revenge for the murder of a kinsman.
sophistry (noun)
Fallacious reasoning; reasoning sound in appearance only.
fulsome (adj)
Offending or disgusting by overfullness, excess, or grossness; cloying.
APPOSITE
Well adapted; suitable or fit; relevant.
INIMICAL
Hostile, opposed. Acting against, adverse and damaging.
bilious (adj)
Ill-tempered
sundry (adj)
Various; miscellaneous
vulpine (adj)
Resembling the fox; cunning; crafty; artful.
baleful (adj)
Menacing, portending evil; having a harmful or malignant influence.
PROVISO
Clause in a contract or agreement that introduces a condition.
JOURNEYMAN:
Someone trained in a skill, usually a craft.
compunction (noun)
Remorse for wrongdoing.. Here is an example of it in use:


He was often described as heartless; he could take candy from a baby and show no compunction.
retrench (v)
To cut off; to pare away
SUPPLICANT
One who entreats or asks submissively..
fodder (noun)
Coarse grains or food for animals..
FURTIVE
Stolen; obtained or characterized by stealth; sly; secret..
FULSOME
Offending or disgusting by overfullness, excess, or grossness; cloying.
EXTANT
Still existing; not destroyed or lost; outstanding.
INTRANSIGENT:
Refusing compromise; irreconcilable
palatial (adj)
Like a castle, magnificent, stately.. Here is an example of it in use:


Coming from a small town in Iowa, Eva was amazed by the palatial houses of the celebrities in Hollywood.
bequest (noun)
That which is left by will, esp. personal property; a legacy; also, a gift..
callow (adj)
Immature; boyish; inexperienced..
excoriate (verb
To criticize severely
apprehend (Verb)
Arrest; anticipate with fear; gain understanding.. Here is an example of it in use:


Given the team's history of losing focus at crucial times, it is understandable that the owners insisted on hiring a coach who apprehended the importance of discipline.
hackles (noun)
The hairs or feathers around an animal's neck..
expedient (adj)
Designed to efficiently achieve a particular end; concerned only with what is advantageous, often in self-interest..
faze (verb)
To disturb; disconcert
ARCHETYPE:
The original pattern or model of a work; the standard.
iconoclast (noun)
One who challenges and criticizes established beliefs..
incendiary (adj)
Tending to excite or inflame factions, sedition, or quarrel; inflammatory..
halcyon (adj)
Calm; quiet; peaceful; undisturbed; happy..
impetuous (adj)
Marked by impulsive anger or violence, as in a hasty and forceful expression of anger
impetuous (adj)
Marked by impulsive anger or violence, as in a hasty and forceful expression of anger..
quotidian (adj)
Commonplace, ordinary. Daily..
PREPOSTEROUS:
Outrageous, unbelievable; contrary to nature or reason.
prosaic (adj)
Commonplace; unimaginative
subsume
Incorporate the function (of something) within a larger entity..
dereliction (noun
Neglect or abandonment. A failure to perform a duty..
ARROGATE
To assume, or claim as one's own; to take over without due cause.
propitiate (verb)
To win the favor of; to cause to become favorably inclined; to appease..
REPAST
A meal; the food and drink served at a meal..
PROPENSITY
Bias; bent; tendency
INVEIGH
To complain or criticize strongly
excoriate (verb)
To criticize severely.
ABROGATE:
To repeal, as in a law; to annul something through an authoritative act.
retrench (verb)
To cut off; to pare away
partisan (noun)
A follower of a certain cause, an adherent. Often refers to a guerilla.
collateral (adj)
Acting indirectly; having lesser importance.
constituent (noun)
vs.
patron
constituent = A person who is represented by another in a legislative assembly

patron = regular customer
mellifluous (adj)
Smooth; flowing sweetly
INVIDIOUS
Worthy of envy; desirable; likely to produce ill will.
HOODWINK
To deceive by false appearance.
Faze
vs.
DAUNT
faze = To disturb; disconcert

daunt = Discourage by reason of difficulty, intimidate, overwhelm, instill fear or lessen courage.
juggernaut (noun)
An overwhelming force or movement that overcomes all resistance.. Here is an example of it in use:


This year's high school football team was described as a juggernaut; not only was it undefeated, no opponent had even scored a point against them.
APPOSITE:
Well adapted; suitable or fit; relevant.
CAPTIOUS
Apt or disposed to find fault
INALIENABLE
Incapable of being removed
extant (adj)
Still existing; not destroyed or lost; outstanding..
mendicant (noun)
A beggar.. Here is an example of it in use:


A mendicant, the monk relied entirely on the kindness of strangers to get his daily food and drink.
INGENUOUS
Innocent and naïve, lacking craftiness
MENDACIOUS
Given to deception or falsehood; lying
feckless (adj)
Irresponsible; weak or ineffective..
BENEDICTION
A blessing; a prayer wishing another favor; an invocation of happiness.
MISNOMER:
Something wrongly named.
moratorium (noun)
A hiatus or pause; a period during which an obligor has a legal right to delay meeting an obligation.. Here is an example of it in use:


Overwhelmed by the number of unread books piling up around the house, Vivian declared a moratorium on bookbuying.
STOLID:
Showing little emotion; impassive.
immutable (adj)
Changeless, unalterable
rectitude (noun)
Rightness of principle or practice..
provident (adj
Saving for the future; prudent..
INVETERATE
Deep-seated or firmly established.. Here is an example of it in use:
He was an inveterate liar, always trying to con people
immolate (Verb)
To sacrifice; to kill, as a sacrificial victim, especially by fire.. Here is an example of it in use:


Many people remember television pictures of the Buddhist monks who would immolate themselves in protest of the Vietnam war; the vivid images of the monks setting themselves on fire have endured decades after the war.
venal (adj)
Capable of being bought; corrupt..
INCENDIARY:
Tending to excite or inflame factions, sedition, or quarrel; inflammatory.
nubile (adj)
Marriable; sexually mature
extirpate (verb)
vs.
deciminate
extirpate (verb) is To eradicate; root out; destroy; exterminate..

deciminate= To destroy a considerable part of (literally reduce by a tenth)..
GARISH
Overly showy; too bright; gaudy.
decadent (adj)
Declining in standards. Appealing in a way that is inappropriate.
decadent
marked by excessive self-indulgence and moral decay; "a decadent life of excessive money and no sense of responsibility";
ENIGMA
vs
subterfuge
ENIGMA: A puzzle; a dark, obscure, or inexplicable saying; something that cannot be adequately explained.

subterfuge=An artifice employed to escape censure or to justify opinions or conduct; a shift; an evasion..
BANDY
To exchange; to toss about, as a ball from person to person.
APPURTENANCE:
An adjunct; an appendage; an accessory
quisling (noun)
A traitor
vanguard (noun)
Front group, leading edge..
pellucid (adj)
Clear; limpid; translucent; not opaque..
RELEGATE
To remove, usually to an inferior position; to transfer
ENJOIN
To give an injunction to; to direct with authority; to order
approbation (noun)
approbation (noun) is Approval; sanction; commendation.. Here is an example of it in use:


The defense lawyer's stirring speech won the approbation of the crowd in the courtroom, who stood and applauded despite the judge's instructions to remain quiet during the proceedings.
redoubtable (adj)
Formidable; valiant; terrible to foes..
RAREFIED
Thinned out; made porous or less dense.
IMPERTINENT
Not to the point, irrelevant, inapplicable; trifling; frivolous; against good manners.
tacit (adj)
Done or made in silence; implied, but not expressed.
approbation (noun)
Approval; sanction; commendation.
Here is an example of it in use:



The defense lawyer's stirring speech won the approbation of the crowd in the courtroom, who stood and applauded despite the judge's instructions to remain quiet during the proceedings.
SATURNINE
Heavy, gloomy, dull
halcyon (adj)
Calm; quiet; peaceful; undisturbed; happy..
foment (verb)
To nurse to life or activity; to encourage..
also to stir up or instigate
TENDENTIOUS
Favoring a certain (often unpopular) point of view..
aegis (noun)
Sponsorship; protection.
cupidity (noun)
Eager or inordinate desire, especially for wealth; greed of gain.. Here is an example of it in use:


Had they not wanted too much, they may have survived; cupidity brought down the dot.com entrepreneurs.
STENTORIAN
extremely loud, powerful
eleemosynary (adj)
pertaining to charity; charitable..
belie (verb)
Show the falsity of something by providing contradictory information..
belie
To picture falsely; misrepresent: “He spoke roughly in order to belie his air of gentility” (James Joyce).
To show to be false: Their laughter belied their outward grief.
To be counter to; contradict: At first glance, life at the boarding school seemed to belie all the bad things I had heard about it.
augur (noun)
One who predicts or foretells; a soothsayer or prophet..
bait (verb)
To provoke and harass; to give a portion of food and drink to, upon the road..
voluble (adj)
Fluent and smooth in speech, garrulous..
RETRENCH
To cut off; to pare away
OBTRUDE
To thrust impertinently; to present without warrant or solicitation.
rend (verb)
To tear one's clothes
inculcate (verb)
Teach something by frequent repetition or repeated warnings..
inculcate
in·cul·cate ( P ) Pronunciation Key (n-klkt, nkl-)
tr.v. in·cul·cat·ed, in·cul·cat·ing, in·cul·cates
To impress (something) upon the mind of another by frequent instruction or repetition; instill: inculcating sound principles.
To teach (others) by frequent instruction or repetition; indoctrinate: inculcate the young with a sense of duty.
distend (verb)
To extend in one direction; to lengthen out..
ENGENDER
To bring about, to generate, to elicit. To cause to come into being.
bate (verb)
To lessen by deducting or reducing..