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23 Cards in this Set

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melody: generally conjunct and singable
narrow range
Medieval
Melody: generally conjunct and singable
wider range
Renaissance
Rhythm: rhythm of chant free or in recurring patterns
triple time, and duple time later accepted
Medieval
Rhythm: Isorhythm and other complex rhythms later
Medieval
Rhythm: metric patterns not emphasized in religious music but clear in many secular works
Renaissance
Rhythm: Generally less complex than previous era
Barlines later devised
Renaissance
Texture: monophony very important
polyphony for 2, 3, and 4 voices by end of period
Medieval
Texture: polyphonic music for 4 voices standard; 5 or more voices often used later
renaissance
Texture: wide use of imitation, some homophony
Renaissance
Timbre: Notated music mainly vocal, small choirs sang monophonic chant, polyphonic music gernally sung by soloists; instrumental music quite important
Medieval
Timbre: notated vocal music still important; small choirs sang polyphonic religious music; secular music for soloists and small ensembles; more music written for instruments
Renaissance
Form: Free vocal chant forms; free and fixed poetic forms or secular music; strophic songs and hymns
Medieval
Form: fixed poetic forms gradually replaced by freer, imitative forms; strophic songs and hymns
Renaissance
compositions: Plainchant settings of parts of the Mass; motet secular and religious; secular songs; instrumental dances
Medieval
Compositions: Polyphonic settings of parts of the Mass; motet mainly religious; secular songs; instrumental dances; instrumental pieces such as the ricercar
Renaissance
Melody: conjunct and disjunct; frequent ornamentation; much use of sequences
Baroque
Rhythm: free rhythm in recitative; steady, driving rhythms and clear meters in many vocal and instrumental works
Baroque
Harmony: based on major-minor system; greater use of dissonance
Baroque
Texture: Polyphony, often imitative, important in vocal and instrumental works; homophony also used frequently
Baroque
Timbre: instrumental music much more important than before; small choral groups; small orchestra of strings, wind, and coninuo; soloists important in vocal and instrumental works
Baroque
Form: binary, ternary, ritronello, and fugue; development of mutli-movement works
Baroque
found in solo concerto or aria, even choral works-IN this form, the tutti opens with a theme called the "this"(refrain). This theme, always played by the tutti, returns in different keys throughout the movement. However, it usually returns in incomplete fragments.
Ritornello
Compositions: mass and motet, often with instrumental accompaniments; opera, contata, and oratorio; sonata, concerto, fugue, and suite
Baroque