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31 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
Cochlea
(structure)
Scala vestibuli
Scala tympani
Cochlear duct
Scala vestibuli
lies above the vestibular membrane
contains perilymph
Scala tympani
The lower tube of the cochlea, extending from the round window to the helicotrema and containing perilymph
Cochlear duct
scala media
Is part of membranous labyrinth
Is separarted from other channels by Vestibular membrane and Basilar membrane
Vestibular membrane
Separates cochlear duct from scala vestibuli
Basilar membrane
Separates cochlear duct from scala tympani
Modiolus
central bony core of cochlea
Spiral organ (organ of corti) or organ of hearing
a coiled sheet of epithelial cells including supporting cells and 16000 hair cells (receptors for hearing).
Spiral organ (organ of corti) or organ of hearing
(STRUCTURE)
Basilar membrane
Hair cells
Supporting cells
Tectorial membrane
Cochlear branch of vestibulocochlear nerve
Hair cells of spiral organ
16,000
sensory receptors
inner hair cells - in single rows
outer hair cells - in 3 rows
tip of each hair cell - hair bundle
Supporting cells of spiral organ
hair bundles
stereocilia
kincilium
Tectorial membrane of spiral organ
Projecting over and in contact with the hair cells of the spiral organ
a flexible gelatinous membrane
Cochlear branch of vestibulocochlear nerve
The hair cells synapse with first-order sensory neurons in the _______.
Equilibrium
Two types
Static
Dynamic
Static
Maintains position of body (esp. head) to force of gravity
Dynamic
Maintains position of body (esp. head) to sudden movements.
Vestibular apparatus
the receptor organs for equilibrium = saccule, utricle and membranous semicircular ducts
Otolithic organs
saccule and utricle
Macula
receptors for static and some aspects of dymanimc equilibrium
Macula
(location)
In walls of saccule and utricle
perpendicular to eachother
Macula
(structure)
Consists of "2" cell types (hair cells and supporting cells)
gelatinous (otolithic) layer
otoliths
Hair cells
sensory receptors
Stereocilia (microvilli)
Kinocilium (cilium)
Supporting cells
Possibly secrete gelatinous layer
Gelatinous (otolithic) layer
On top of hair cells
Otoliths
Calcium carbinate crystals
Membranous semicircular ducts
for dynamic equilibrium
Work with saccule and utricle
Ampula
swelling (dialated) portion of each duct
contains crista
Crista
contains hair cells, supporting cells, and cupula
a small elevation of the ampula.
cupula
A gelatinous mass that overlies the hair cells of the ampulla of the semicircular ducts; movement of endolymphatic fluid causes the _____ to move across the hair cells of the ampullary crest.
Vestibular branch of vestibulocochlear nerve
supplies both macula and semicircular ducts
Sound travel in the ear(simple definition)
outer ear - traps sound waves and funnels them down the ear canal to the middle ear
middle ear - sound waves cause the eardrum to vibrate much like the membrane on a drum. These vibrations then move through three little bones called the hammer, anvil and stirrup.
inner ear - when the stirrup vibrates, fluids in the cochlea (fluid-filled structure shaped like a snail's shell) begin to vibrate. These vibrations stimulate nerve endings that carry the signal to the brain. These messages are interpreted as sounds!